Moon of Alabama Brecht quote
July 04, 2023

Punishing Sanctions

Xi to Biden:

Do you really want to hamper our chip producing companies?

Really?

China curbs critical metal exports in retaliation for Western restrictions on chip industry

China on Monday ordered export restrictions on two technology-critical elements in retaliation for new Western sanctions on its semiconductor industry.

The restrictions, which take effect on August 1, will apply to gallium and germanium metals and several of their compounds, which are key materials for making semiconductors and other electronics.

The Ministry of Commerce said in a statement that the export controls on gallium- and germanium-related items were necessary “to safeguard national security and interests”.

Exporters in China will need to apply for permission from the ministry, with information about the end users and how the materials will be used.

Gallium and germanium are used in lots of electronic components. AESA (active electronically scanned array) radars used on modern warships and fighter airplanes can not be made without those metals. China produces some 95% of those available on the global market.

It will take one or two years until the currently available stocks outside of China are diminished. But it takes much longer to open up new mining and processing facilities for replacement of the Chinese production. The processes used therein are quite dirty. A not-in-my-backyard attitude will make any setup of new facilities difficult to pursue.

The situation will soon become similar to the titanium market where Russia is the biggest global supplier but has restricted access for certain customers.

This is just one of many cards China (and Russia) can play in their anti-sanction games.

The U.S. is reaching the limits of its sanction power.

Posted by b on July 4, 2023 at 7:21 UTC | Permalink

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Germanium is also used for infra-red lenses; used in devices with heat vision.

Posted by: Passerby | Jul 4 2023 7:24 utc | 1

and the US continues to pursue their losing strategy. The Wiley Coyotes just can't help themselves (credit karlof1).

Posted by: pretzelattack | Jul 4 2023 7:25 utc | 2

There is nobody in the Biden regime who could qualify as a “leader” on the world stage. It’s a tragically humiliating end to an empire that should have been great.

Posted by: ElJefe | Jul 4 2023 7:29 utc | 3

Game on 😂

Posted by: Oui | Jul 4 2023 7:35 utc | 4

I dont think Russia has any Titanium reserves , most titanium comes from Australia , India , china , Canada , Norway and South Africa , Ukraine has descent titanium reserves but not largest , Russia has none

Posted by: gm | Jul 4 2023 7:43 utc | 5

If they would actually be trying to give the finger to France and Germany - rather than just to the US - they could hardly do better than nanning gallium and germanium 🤣🤣🤣

Posted by: Bart | Jul 4 2023 7:46 utc | 6

banning* lol

Posted by: Bart | Jul 4 2023 7:47 utc | 7

This is weird. It's also rather like the way the U.S. treated Japan before World War II. But at least the U.S. then was the world's largest manufacturing power.

Do they really think that ineffectually poking an adversary with a blunt stick is the royal road to world domination?

Posted by: MFB | Jul 4 2023 7:47 utc | 8

The earliest post ever seen from B.

Happy 4th of July to my American compatriots.

Next, China should restrict fireworks exports! That would really stick a wrench in America's gears.

Posted by: Zak | Jul 4 2023 7:49 utc | 9

Zhang Yushuo's article in 'China Inside Out' on the effect the introduction of export control is having on Gallium and Germanium's Chinese export corporations:


"(Yicai Global) July 4 -- Shares of leading Chinese gallium and germanium producers and jumped after China said it will start controlling the exports of the two key semiconductor raw materials from next month.

Yunnan Lincang Xinyuan Germanium Industry [SHE: 002428] soared by the 10 percent daily exchange-imposed trading limit to CNY13.09 (USD1.81). Yunnan Chihong Zinc and Germanium [SHA: 600497] was trading up 7.1 percent at CNY5.45 (75 US cents) as of today’s lunch break.

Fuda Alloy Materials [SHA: 603045] surged by the 10 percent limit to CNY16.69. The firm does not produce any gallium at the moment but is in talks to acquire Coalmine Aluminum Sanmenxia, a leading Chinese maker of the material."

One thing is for sure on comparative pricing of features against prices, China's phones are gonna stretch the gap even further. many amerikans seem to buy iphones no matter how much more so it is China's move against S.Korea in phones and sounds like vehicles too. Was bound to happen, sadly for the people of S.Korea who are living in an amerikan colony with no final say over anything so get stuck with the reputation of being nearly as un-neighbourly & agreement incapable as amerika itself.

Lastly the control I'm waiting to watch but will likely never happen is amerika introducing a way of reducing amerikan funds 'n finance houses' investments in China's stock market.
As long as so many of amerika's money printing pools have so much invested in China they are always going to demand a big say in when amerika tries to do what to China; all the toin' & froin' in the senate about "really cracking down on those Chinese commies for once and for all" gets stuck cos rethug donors don't like the bill.

Posted by: Debsisdead | Jul 4 2023 7:53 utc | 10

Gallium is found together with bauxit, where Australia and Guinea are with over 50% the biggest producers.
Germanium is part of brown coal and can be gotten from ash. In 2021 China produced 95t, Russia 5t and the rest of the world another 40t.

China has 94% marketshare for gallium and 83% for germanium. But only because they produced it much cheaper than the rest of the world. The West will adapt. Time to buy stock of bauxit and brown coal companies.

Posted by: Ali | Jul 4 2023 8:11 utc | 11

Re #5

Russia isn't a raw titanium powerhouse, but it is really good at working with titanium:
https://www.aerotime.aero/articles/32464-titanium-supply-crisis-what-does-this-mean-for-aerospace

While Russia is only the third largest titanium producer in the world, positioned far behind China and Japan by the amount of material produced, when it comes to aerospace-grade titanium, it was the largest supplier, producing half of world’s titanium used in aerospace before 2022. ... But attempts are being made to mitigate this problem. One solution would be to purchase titanium from China [LOL] ... Another solution would be to restart domestic manufacturing. ... Europe, where sources of titanium are scarce, is in a far more precarious position, and more creative solutions will be needed to address the issue.

Titanium is one of the more difficult materials to machine: https://kingsburyuk.com/machining-titanium-is-it-really-that-hard/

And Russia has been good at titanium for a long time: https://www.realcleardefense.com/articles/2022/06/10/the_dangers_of_us_reliance_on_russian_titanium_836740.html

It was 1960 and Washington needed spy planes that could avoid detection in Soviet airspace by flying to the heavens. To make what would become the vaunted SR-71 Blackbird, Lockheed Martin knew it had to build a light plane, but one that was strong enough to hold extra fuel to give it expansive range. The only metal that would do the job was titanium. The only place to get titanium in the needed quantities was the Soviet Union.

Posted by: ancow | Jul 4 2023 8:24 utc | 12

China is the largest producer of titanium in the world as it has major reserves of ilmenite ore that account for 30% of the world's titanium reserves.

Major ilmenite sources can be traced to the Panzhihua region in Sichuan province, China, which boasts the world's largest vanadium-titanium magnetite deposit. Another name with the highest titanium mining by country is Australia, which has both ilmenite and rutile reserves.

Next follows Norway …

Posted by: Oui | Jul 4 2023 8:27 utc | 13

Titanium itself is easy to find. Alloys are very hard to make and the reason Boeing had exclusive contracts with Russia. Those very long term contracts were renewed for another 20+ years before smo and canceled by Boeing themselves after smo started. Japan can't make it. Boeing has stocks, they can live without imports for a while, 1-2 years probably.

Posted by: rk | Jul 4 2023 8:40 utc | 14

America's Sanctions Boomerang strikes again.

As Homer Simpson would say, Doh!

Posted by: ak74 | Jul 4 2023 8:57 utc | 15

"I dont think Russia has any Titanium reserves , most titanium comes from Australia , India , china , Canada , Norway and South Africa , Ukraine has descent titanium reserves but not largest , Russia has none"
Posted by: gm | Jul 4 2023 7:43 utc | 5

I didn't believe this statement so a quick search

The Ruchar mine is one of the largest titanium mines in Russia.[1] The mine is located in the Far Eastern Federal District.[1] The mine has reserves amounting to 3 billion tonnes of ore grading 15% titanium.

Posted by: Bluedog57 | Jul 4 2023 9:09 utc | 16

"Titanium is one of the more difficult materials to machine: https://kingsburyuk.com/machining-titanium-is-it-really-that-hard/"

I did some work at WASA in Australia some years back. This is where the metals for NASA spacecraft is produced. The titanium alloys completely destroy any grinding wheels it is so hard. Most parts produced are pressed, not machined into shape.

Posted by: Bluedog57 | Jul 4 2023 9:18 utc | 17

If they would actually be trying to give the finger to France and Germany - rather than just to the US - they could hardly do better than nanning gallium and germanium 🤣🤣🤣

Posted by: Bart | Jul 4 2023 7:46 utc | 6

Indeed.

Posted by: Bemildred | Jul 4 2023 9:18 utc | 18

Yes, it is sort of like your thumb deciding to attack your hand. Being pro-active about self-destruction.

Posted by: Bemildred | Jul 4 2023 9:24 utc | 19

Titanium is one of the more difficult materials to machine: https://kingsburyuk.com/machining-titanium-is-it-really-that-hard/
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - --

Everything you try to do with titanium and its alloys is technically difficult.
In my working life in metal processing, I have worked on:
- extrusion of titanium seamless tube
- cold-drawing of seamless tube
- ultrasonic immersion testing of seamless tube and bar
- cutting of tube and bar
- straightening of tube and bar

..... and a few more operations.
Everything you try to do with titanium and its alloys is "hard work".
Respect to those who can do it.

The clobber list continually contains reference to losses of the USA-built M777 field howitzer.
Apart from the barrel and the recoil buffer pepper-pots, almost all the major components of this 155mm mighty gun are made from Ti-64 alloy.
Cost no object !
They were designed with the Afghanistan theatre in mind.
Much less suited to the UKR theatre.
How sad !

Posted by: Engineer-John | Jul 4 2023 9:56 utc | 20

I am convinced that Russia is still planning to use (now much more limited) gas supplies to EU countries as leverage to bring them on board with settling the conflict. That's why at the same time they sabotaged NSII the US has increased their presence in EU countries by some 50% over the last year, up to over 100.000.
Let's see what's more scary a locally supported (by military and police) US occupation, or freezing to death.

Posted by: Tiago | Jul 4 2023 10:06 utc | 21

#11

'Germanium is part of brown coal and can be gotten from ash. In 2021 China produced 95t, Russia 5t and the rest of the world another 40t.'

Whoops! There goes the West's Net Zero plans. Brown coal is the dirtiest to burn...

Posted by: scepticalSOB | Jul 4 2023 10:19 utc | 22

The world is at the present bringing down the economy on all sides.
The western empire's dominance agenda is the main cause of this.
The result of bringning down everybody's economy may be seen as acceptable for the western masterminds.
One aspect may be related to the opening of Pandoras box regarding the means to pull the brakes on aging and even reverse aging.
There is also the aim to develop AI to pass the barrier separating a robot context from a living conscious brand of AI.
To the extent any of this is approaching reality it may change the priorities for the elites.
When they seemed to be serious about encouraging sexchange operations and related things for small children in daycare I felt that this extreme move would be compatible with preparations for increasing the infertile proportion of the population.

Leaving more room in the population queue.

Room for people with artificially extended lifespan.

When the Georgia guidestones were destroyed was it to protest the malthusian mindset it represents or was it to cover up the existence of this ever having been shown to the public?

Another thing relating to the war:
I suspect that the empire consciously plays on the neocons potential appetite for punishing all those who have some former duplicity with the WW2 nazi atrocities.

There is a preponderance of germanic nations among those who have been and are set to die in Ukraine.

Ukraine (the Baltic countries?), Poland Finland Sweden and Germany. But also the french and anglosaxons.

Of course the geography is the apparent reason.

But since there was never any good reason for the concerned nations to be involved there may be this additional reason about retribution as a carrot to tempt the neocons to be more eager to encourage Poland Finland and Sweden to be next on the line for slaughter.

However that said I dont think it is any crucial aspect, since I dont see the neocons as anything but an imperial stooge.

It is just a convenient feature aiding the imperial motive with respect to bringing/diverting more attention to the jews.

I bring it up because the concerned nations ought to think about it and try to move away from the danger.
Any reason for backing off is a good reason.

Posted by: petergrfstrm | Jul 4 2023 10:22 utc | 23

#21

'The clobber list continually contains reference to losses of the USA-built M777 field howitzer.
Apart from the barrel and the recoil buffer pepper-pots, almost all the major components of this 155mm mighty gun are made from Ti-64 alloy.
Cost no object !
They were designed with the Afghanistan theatre in mind.
Much less suited to the UKR theatre.
How sad !
Posted by: Engineer-John | Jul 4 2023 9:56 utc | 21'

So if I was a Ukranian or Russian soldier with a tank or an APC to hand, I'd be towing the ruined M777s to the nearest scarp yard and make a small fortune!

There's probably a lull today in the Ukraine from about 3pm today as the US folks get drunk, so now's the time to get towing!

Posted by: scepticalSOB | Jul 4 2023 10:24 utc | 24

Also, Russia has many areas it can retaliate against sanctions, in addition to titanium. In the specific area of chip manufacturing, the emerald (and other) substrates from Russia, really can't be produced any other place on earth, due to seismic problems.

Posted by: mcbake | Jul 4 2023 10:27 utc | 25

Last time we bought some titanium material for our machining subcontractor (to produce some custom aerospace parts) from an "American" source it arrived wrapped in a recent Beijing newspaper, lol.

Posted by: BillB | Jul 4 2023 10:33 utc | 26

I'd not realised that there are ZERO sanctions on Russian metals, and US/UK/EU are still buying Russian titanium, because their aerospace industries depend on it.

Posted by: YetAnotherAnon | Jul 4 2023 10:35 utc | 27

@ traducteur

Baby Prigozhin - Oink! (Cover)

https://youtu.be/DJu2LuHuexg

Posted by: Publius Flavius | Jul 4 2023 10:42 utc | 28

The BRICS currency is coming. 30 new countries applied to join BRICS and they are even talking about pegging their currency to gold.

US will need to buy all their titanium, geranium, gallium, palladium and everything else with the gold pegged BRICS currency soon enough. But of course it's not really "US", it's - like Martyanov said - the real question is whether Rotschild's, Blackrock, Rockefellers and these guys can sneak their wealth into the BRICS system and continue enjoying the fruits of similar interest based financial capitalism as in tjhe west. The west is becoming very unstable, unreliable and capital hates fluctuations.

Btw, Klaus Schwab recently said that China is the world's dominant superpower. They are like parasites, trying to detach from the rotten west and onto a new healthy host.

Posted by: unimperator | Jul 4 2023 10:51 utc | 29

@ 10

Speaking of South Korea, there is some activity in Canada that involves them, could be considered alongside your remarks.

They sent firefighters here recently.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/south-korean-firefighters-quebec-1.6895080

And the ports of Vancouver and Prince Rupert on Canada’s Pacific Coast are currently on strike. The two ports closest to China, btw.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/port-strike-1.6895907

Posted by: Bruised Northerner | Jul 4 2023 10:54 utc | 30

I'd not realised that there are ZERO sanctions on Russian metals, and US/UK/EU are still buying Russian titanium, because their aerospace industries depend on it.

Posted by: YetAnotherAnon | Jul 4 2023 10:35 utc | 28

The fact is that during the sanctions regime of the west, the global market never ceased to function. What changed was that EUrope lost direct venues of trading with Russia. Russian commodities move through China, India, Middle East and Africa, from where Europe buys something. But the real game changer was EU becoming much more reliant on the US.

US continues to buy whatever for dollars and sells at huge profit to Europe. The Duran made a video just yesterday or few days ago that Biden administration has now managed to get EU tie itself into detaching economy from China. There will be a struggle of this for sure within Europe, but there are enough stupid vassals who will commit that suicide.

Posted by: unimperator | Jul 4 2023 10:58 utc | 31

nd the ports of Vancouver and Prince Rupert on Canada’s Pacific Coast are currently on strike. The two ports closest to China, btw.

Posted by: Bruised Northerner | Jul 4 2023 10:54 utc | 31
----------------

They usually calls it Hongcouver... :)

Posted by: ostro | Jul 4 2023 11:02 utc | 32

Sort of all-American Apple stuff can only be made in unfriendly to the US countries, China, India or Mexico. The same goes with all the Windows laptops/computers...and the so-called British ARM chips...Fun!

Posted by: ostro | Jul 4 2023 11:07 utc | 33

Posted by: gm | Jul 4 2023 7:43 utc | 5
Ukraine has descent titanium reserves but not largest , Russia has none.

Ilmenite is named after the Ilmensky Mountains near Miass, Russia. Take a guess why.

Posted by: oubok | Jul 4 2023 11:24 utc | 34

The US will just do what Russia has been doing, buying sanctioned goods via 3rd party at a handsome markup.

Posted by: Zpiskin9 | Jul 4 2023 11:30 utc | 35

Iran has become the ninth member of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization. - the New Delhi Declaration of the Council of Heads of State.

Posted by: ostro | Jul 4 2023 11:31 utc | 36

Since Twatter is still in lockdown mode against unregistered users (moi) I am having to rely on Telegram for worldwide updates of what’s happening on the ground. I wish Geroman would update his as frequently.

The most important thing today is the SCO heads of state in Delhi. Remember this is just a week after Modi was being feted in DC and addressing both Houses.

So it is particularly hilarious that the grand meeting is on 4th July, l wonder if the irony will register in the Collective Waste?

Quick highlights. Bold emphasise is mine. All from
https://t.me/llordofwar/168526

‘The SCO can become an important voice in reforming global institutions, including the UN, the Prime Minister of India said at the opening of the summit.

Also, the Prime Minister of India welcomed Iran's accession to the Shanghai Cooperation Organization and the signing by Belarus of a memorandum of intent to join the SCO.

"The SCO countries must strengthen cooperation in order to counter the financing of terrorism," he said.

The Shanghai Cooperation Organization is firmly committed to building a just, multipolar world order based on international law. This was stated by Vladimir Putin at the association's summit.

Video: TASS/Ruptly


Xi Jinping's statements at the SCO summit :

- The SCO must resist color revolutions and interference of external forces in the affairs of the countries of the region;

- The SCO must oppose hegemonism, defend the world order based on international law;

- The SCO countries must resist unilateral economic sanctions.

Xi Jinping also proposed to increase the share of national currencies in settlements between the countries of the organization.

🇬🇧 Putin's statements at the SCO summit:

▪️A "hybrid war" is being waged against Russia

▪️The Russians opposed the attempted rebellion in a united front;

▪️The people of Russia are more united than ever;

▪️Russia confidently opposes and will oppose sanctions and restrictions;

▪️The SCO is firmly committed to the formation of a world order based on international law;

▪️The key task of the SCO is to maintain security;

▪️The uncontrolled accumulation of debts by developed countries increases the risks of a new global crisis;’

No wonder Social Media Moghuls don’t want us having access to the New emerging from its chrysalis today.

REJOICE. A REAL INDEPENDENCE DAY FINALLY ARRIVED FOR HUMANITY AS A WHOLE.

Posted by: DunGroanin | Jul 4 2023 11:32 utc | 37

I dont think Russia has any Titanium reserves , most titanium comes from Australia , India , china , Canada , Norway and South Africa , Ukraine has descent titanium reserves but not largest , Russia has none

Posted by: gm | Jul 4 2023 7:43 utc | 5

Thank you for posting at number 5, so that the question of "Who is the biggest idiot in the thread?" can be settled early, and without all the ancillary discussion.

Posted by: Intelligent Dasein | Jul 4 2023 11:35 utc | 38

Mine production of titanium minerals worldwide in 2022, by country
Source: Statista 2023

Russia is not listed.

Posted by: Ernesto Che | Jul 4 2023 11:36 utc | 39

I'm in the mining business and rare earths are not rare at all. North America has plenty of rare earths in the ground, one of my companies has such deposits.

Why China leads in the production of these elements is because of their refining techniques. China uses chlorinization (chlorine) to refine rare earths. Chlorinization is an efficient and cheap refining technology BUT it is devastating to the environment. Chlorinization kills creeks, rivers, lakes and water tables hence, wisely, these refining techniques it is outlawed in all Western jurisdictions.

So Western companies will have no problem finding rare earths but refining them with eco friendly refining techniques will make the elements very, very costly to the end user.

Posted by: canuck | Jul 4 2023 11:52 utc | 40

Next time you think titanium is in short supply go to the paint store. Three pounds (1.5kg) of titanium dioxide in every bucket. By the time ore becomes dioxide the bulk of processing is complete.

Russia's advantage is they have cheap energy, lots of electric is required to process ore. They have experience forming the metal. They have capable technical people.

US has expensive energy. US has no experience because we outsourced all that. US does not believe in its people.

Posted by: oldhippie | Jul 4 2023 11:59 utc | 41

Both metals are byproducts of zinc refining (similar to indium). You don't mine their ores directly. If demand increases, then you make more efforts to collect byproducts, scrubber flue gases, etc. It does involve some capital equipment decisions and thus does not turn on a dime. And people won't invest in the capital if the market perceives high prices as being short term, not long.

Now the liberal (and yes Trump was a liberal, big spender) pro-government wing of the Repukes will want to come in with more "industrial policy" (remember that from the 80s...when everyone said we should ape Japan and German) like the massive semiconductor subsidy program.

I say let the free market fight it out. That price goes up...people will install scrubber waste recovery systems. Let the high prices drive the change.

Posted by: Capitalist | Jul 4 2023 12:08 utc | 42

unimperator @30: "Klaus Schwab recently said that China is the world's dominant superpower. They are like parasites, trying to detach from the rotten west and onto a new healthy host."

They are going to find the Communist Party of China a hard nut to crack. It isn't like America where you can buy your political prostitutes for a cool bargain basement hundred benjamins each. The global lords of capital will have to buy off the better portion of the nearly hundred million members of the CPC, all while any party member being caught taking those bribes faces a firing squad. That is before we even get to the issue of the communist ideological barrier against one prostituting oneself to capitalism. China's communists are at least partially aware of the culturally and politically cancerous nature of capitalism and so only use market forces instrumentally and deliberately keep them under the thumb of the CPC.

The lords of capital are not going to be able to buy their way into being China's overlords like they have in the US and Europe, so I am not convinced they will abandon their current power bases, even as those power bases degenerate into cultural and economic shit.

Posted by: William Gruff | Jul 4 2023 12:09 utc | 43

Posted by: Debsisdead | Jul 4 2023 7:53 utc | 10


There is some suspicion that the major NATO investment houses are no longer putting new money into greater China. A tell is the relative stagnation of the greater china stock markets.

Posted by: Exile | Jul 4 2023 12:11 utc | 44

I dont think Russia has any Titanium reserves
Posted by: gm | Jul 4 2023 7:43 utc | 5

U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY MINERALS YEARBOOK—2019
Russia: 22% of world production of titaiun sponge. Annual capacity: 44,700 ton.
More detailed information: search for "титан" at https://rosstat.gov.ru/

I'd settle for marking "gm" as "Ukrainian troll".

Posted by: Passerby | Jul 4 2023 12:14 utc | 45

The earthquake I want to see is China demand purchases be made in yuan of strategic materials. That would freak out Congress.

The problem with metals is that mining takes so many years to build and locks up capital for years with no return. I own shares of a very nice tungsten and future molybdenum miner that's pennies per share and it's a very long wait.

Posted by: Eighthman | Jul 4 2023 12:24 utc | 46

Barflies -

Guess in which part of 1991 Ukraine were the titanium mining operations and processing industry ?

😂

Posted by: Exile | Jul 4 2023 12:25 utc | 47

The restrictions. …… will apply to gallium…
Gallium. Hahah
Gallium.
I hope the Chinese chose that metal just because of its name, ahead of anything else …
Gallium 🤣

Posted by: Melaleuca | Jul 4 2023 12:30 utc | 48

Gen Z Troll Legion @47:"... state capitalism...."

Speaking of being mislead by meaningless labels!

Of course, the mindless troll is, as we type, wearing at minimum half a dozen prominently displayed corporate logos that are intimately integrated into the "identity" it possesses over which it has no control.

"Flimflammed" indeed! Our troll is a standard American meat robot that is remote-controlled
by marketing campaigns, which are what brought it here.

Posted by: William Gruff | Jul 4 2023 12:33 utc | 49

Most of y’all just don’t get it!
The greater the need for a device to operate at the limits of physics and chemistry that can be tolerated by us biological organisms, the greater the need for exotic materials that evidence such “magic” properties in standard terrestrial conditions. The USA has been blessed with many natural resources, but not all of the ones necessary to produce sensors and payloads of wunder-waffen.
Now, we COULD use this stuff for peaceful, wealth-producing purposes, but that would require us to adopt a completely different, trading oriented foreign policy. A policy that recognizes we must outbid others for scarce resources, if we really want them. The best way to do that is by offering Win-Win commercial partnerships. Given our brief history, both here and overseas, I doubt that anybody out there trusts us to “play fair”.
Bottom line is: How many of you Sunny-Day Patriots are willing to endure what the Soviet and Chinese peoples endured during WWII? Unless we as a Nation are willing to sacrifice at that level, and keep on living and fighting until we are Free from foreign occupation, all you do is merely posture. Show some balls, and put your own necks on the line.
Otherwise, shut up, and accept the end of Anglo-World.
Happy Birthday USA! 🇺🇸. Live Free or Die, Don’t Tread On Me!

Posted by: OldFart | Jul 4 2023 12:33 utc | 50

The problem with metals is that mining takes so many years to build and locks up capital for years with no return. I own shares of a very nice tungsten and future molybdenum miner that's pennies per share and it's a very long wait.

Posted by: Eighthman | Jul 4 2023 12:24 utc | 46
-----------

And, you might not get your money back, or if/when any money would be earned from those shares, they won't worth the money you put in.

Posted by: ostro | Jul 4 2023 12:35 utc | 51

looking at titanium it appears that Statista has purged Russia from the statistics, I have to wonder how many other Russian stats they threw out?

Posted by: SwissArmyMan | Jul 4 2023 12:35 utc | 52

… USA-built M777 field howitzer … made from Ti-64 alloy … Cost no object

Posted by: Engineer-John | Jul 4 2023 9:56 utc | 21

The Yankee MIC is a vast system of tribute and demarcation, a real pirate republic.

There are stock items that are produced at near-commodity prices - dumb bullets, shells, what have you - but all the manufactures covert proprietary, single-source or single-integrator products. F-35 is a triumph of MIC profit optimisation.

It makes an absolute mockery out of determining what is the true cost effectiveness of real or hypothesised weapon systems. The rest of the world, though not nearly so bad, rarely departs from the same price and feature ranking.

MIC product are priced in the coin of someone else’s pocket, not their own, thus they are as expensive as possible and, even when theoretically reasonably priced, often of outlandish specification and cost.

Posted by: anon2020 | Jul 4 2023 12:46 utc | 53

Russia is running out of natural resources. Any day now.

Posted by: Skiffer | Jul 4 2023 12:51 utc | 54

"So if I was a Ukranian or Russian soldier with a tank or an APC to hand, I'd be towing the ruined M777s to the nearest scarp yard and make a small fortune!

......... now's the time to get towing!"
Posted by: scepticalSOB | Jul 4 2023 10:24 utc | 24
- - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Possible ... BUT
Titanium alloy scrap certainly has value BUT is not worth as much as you may think it is.
Titanium bar or billet after processing - YES.
It's a long energy-and-technology-intensive process to convert mixed Ti scrap into valuable billet for further processing.

Posted by: Engineer-John | Jul 4 2023 12:54 utc | 55

looking at titanium it appears that Statista has purged Russia from the statistics, I have to wonder how many other Russian stats they threw out?

Posted by: SwissArmyMan | Jul 4 2023 12:35 utc | 52

While Russia was number 3 in the world as far as production just last year, it appears they have low reserves.

Importance of Russian titanium to global industry

Posted by: Frank McGar | Jul 4 2023 12:55 utc | 56

… USA-built M777 field howitzer … made from Ti-64 alloy … Cost no object

Posted by: Engineer-John | Jul 4 2023 9:56 utc | 21

The Yankee MIC is a vast system of tribute and demarcation, a real pirate republic.

Posted by: anon2020 | Jul 4 2023 12:46 utc | 54

Posted by: Engineer-John | Jul 4 2023 13:00 utc | 57

… USA-built M777 field howitzer … made from Ti-64 alloy … Cost no object

Posted by: Engineer-John | Jul 4 2023 9:56 utc | 21

The Yankee MIC is a vast system of tribute and demarcation, a real pirate republic.

Posted by: anon2020 | Jul 4 2023 12:46 utc | 54

- - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
At least one (possibly two) of the early manufacturing batches of M777 were built by BAE Land Systems at Barrow-in-Furness, UK.
An awesome piece of kit !!

Posted by: Engineer-John | Jul 4 2023 13:03 utc | 58

I didn't believe this statement so a quick search
The Ruchar mine is one of the largest titanium mines in Russia.[1] The mine is located in the Far Eastern Federal District.[1] The mine has reserves amounting to 3 billion tonnes of ore grading 15% titanium.
Posted by: Bluedog57 | Jul 4 2023 9:09 utc | 16

Thanks for that ! I was sure that I had previously read about Russia have Titanium mines, but when I looked eg Statista that info seemed to have disappeared. Strange how that happens...

Posted by: Al Batross | Jul 4 2023 13:08 utc | 59

… An awesome piece of kit !!

Posted by: Engineer-John | Jul 4 2023 13:03 utc | 59

Sure, a thing can be technically impressive in and of itself, yet still be … of outlandish specification and cost =)

The cost is a form of tribute, diverting government spending within the US and its vassals, away from public good, towards the MIC.

Posted by: anon2020 | Jul 4 2023 13:22 utc | 60

From GM

"I dont think Russia has any Titanium reserves , most titanium comes from Australia , India , china , Canada , Norway and South Africa , Ukraine has descent titanium reserves but not largest , Russia has none"

Sorry, Titanium is more common than iron. Russia in gloabl leader in producing certified forged aviation titanium. Most of the world Titanium production is used in simple painting. You are totally wrong!

Posted by: Gast | Jul 4 2023 13:26 utc | 61

China has cancelled Borrell's visit. No reason given, no re-visit date options given.

Message from Xi to EU commission: we told you pipsqueaks what you should do earlier, namely gain strategic independence from the US, until then we have nothing to talk about.
https://twitter.com/SpriterTeam/status/1676204490519719936

Posted by: unimperator | Jul 4 2023 13:34 utc | 62

As I stated earlier......
The information did not originate here...

The source article was published by the South China Morning Post....
https://www.scmp.com/news/china/diplomacy/article/3226430/china-curbs-critical-metal-exports-retaliation-western-restrictions-chip-industry

China curbs critical metal exports in retaliation for Western restrictions on chip industry

Beijing orders export controls on gallium, germanium and several of their compounds, which are used to make semiconductors and electronics

The rules come just after the Netherlands announces new measures to limit China’s access to advanced chip manufacturing equipment

China’s semiconductor ambitions dealt fresh blow by new Dutch export rules on ASML chip-making machines

Effective September 1, ASML will need a government export license to sell its most advanced immersion DUV lithography systems to China

The Chinese government condemned the US for ‘coercing’ other countries into imposing technological blockades on China

The Netherlands government just dealt a fresh blow to China’s semiconductor industry with further restrictions on shipments of ASML’s chip-making equipment to the country, but it may not be the last word as the US is reportedly seeking to further tighten the choke hold on China’s chip ambitions.
ASML said in a statement on Friday that effective September 1, it will be required to apply for a license from The Hague to ship its most advanced immersion deep ultraviolet (DUV) lithography systems, including the TWINSCAN NXT: 2000i, and more sophisticated models.
In response, the Chinese government condemned the US for “coercing” other countries into imposing technological blockades on China and “undermining market rules and international trade” as well as the stability of the global supply chain.
“China will pay close attention to relevant developments and resolutely safeguard its legitimate rights and interests,” Mao Ning, spokeswoman for the Chinese Foreign Ministry, said at a press conference on Friday.
The impact of the updated export controls could initially be limited, as the NXT: 2000i and higher-end tools are used for the more advanced 7-nanometre and 5-nm process nodes, which are already difficult for Chinese chip makers to tackle given broader US export controls.
At Chinese chip conference, industry veterans have US sanctions top of mind
29 Jun 2023

ASML’s lower-end NXT1980i, which can be used for 10-nm node chips, is still allowed for sale to China.
Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography machines from ASML, used by top chip makers like Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co, Samsung Electronics and Intel to produce leading-edge chips for smartphones and artificial intelligence applications, were already banned for export to China.
The latest ban did not come as a complete surprise, as the company as early as March had warned that it may be subject to broader export restrictions on advanced chip-making equipment, but it showed that Beijing’s diplomatic efforts with The Hague had fallen on deaf ears."

Virtually all the above was ignored by Bernhard.....
YET.....
Is critical to understanding Chinese determination to follow through on the ban(s).

INDY

Posted by: Dr. George W Oprisko | Jul 4 2023 13:38 utc | 63

Did any of the above consider why China chose to ban the sale of Gallium to NATO??

IT's BECAUSE.....

China is forging dominance in a new paradigm of advanced chips.....
Based upon Gallium-Arsenide... and other exotics....

This is basically a case where NATO shot itself in the foot....
Jawboning ASML into banning sales of UV lithographic equipment to China to keep dominance of Silicon based ICs....

Causing China to ban sales of raw materials required to compete with China in the Gallium-Arsenide sector....

INDY

Posted by: Dr. George W Oprisko | Jul 4 2023 13:48 utc | 64

Meanwhile Indian oil companies, ignoring the Modi regime's official orders (but certainly with the same Modi regime's unofficial permission), have started paying for Russian and Saudi oil in yuans.

Posted by: Biswapriya Purkayast | Jul 4 2023 13:56 utc | 65

I don't think Russia will take Odessa but if they did, they could nab the ultra pure neon factory there. Another strike in the chip wars.

Posted by: Eighthman | Jul 4 2023 13:57 utc | 66

@ oldhippy

"USA does not believe in its people"

The CEOs that actually understood their business and built teams and value were fired by the boards over the past decades for CEOs that outsourced. A CEO that outsourced and had zero understanding of the business but knew how to cut and outsource made the stock go up more than a CEO who built value. This is a function of the reserve currency curse. When a currency has value based on a financial instrument not the productivity and assets of a country it destroys the productivity of the country. What we observe is the late stages of this folly. Since all value is placed on the reserve currency status for the country's standard of living that reserve currency status must be maintained at all cost. The alternative a standard of living based on productivity and assets doesn't physically exist nor is inexpensive domestic energy sans reserve currency status available to re create it. Neither China nor Russia want reserve currency status. In fact both were willing to let the USA destroy its real assets for funny money status. That the funny money status is invincible is a delusion that now slowly becomes apparent. The delusion is shown in Ukraine. Why topple Russia it was fully participating in using the dollar and the delusion? Stupid. Now Russia has called out the delusion. Their is no greater affront. The USA is called out as a deluded naked fat old man. A deluded naked fat old man with somewhat dated nuclear weapon technology in both hands and no options to go spear fish at the river. Certainly the USA is the most unreasonable of the parties being deluded but all parties are a bit deluded. Yes fat old man just sit down and die dont throw those old nukes. Perhaps not deluded but not reasonable. Russia understood that they had participated in the creation of the funny money monster and was willing to find solutions. China is a deal is a deal stupid in their own way. Now no one is seeking real solutions so the outcome is obvious. The thing about nuclear weapon technology is it age well because of its raw power even if delivery system technology doesnt. A V-12 engine doesnt have to be efficient.

Posted by: sillydog | Jul 4 2023 14:02 utc | 67

This book explains how China does it

Sovereign Funds: How the Communist Party of China Finances Its Global Ambitions.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Sovereign-Funds-Communist-Finances-Ambitions/dp/0674271912


Anybody who still has access to Twitter can look up the authors Twitter feed and she lists 7 ways they do it with Sovereign leverage funds. It is an excellent book.

Posted by: Echo Chamber | Jul 4 2023 14:09 utc | 68

Posted by: Ali | Jul 4 2023 8:11 utc | 11

Really good information in your post. Do you think by 2025 the West will be able to recover supply by 100%? I ask about 2025 because it looks like the Iran War will start in 2025 after the US election in 2024 because Biden is about to enter into a min-deal with Iran that puts conflict off until after the election. Does the export ban interfere with weapons production for weapons and munitions used in an Iran War if the metals are still in short supply in 2025 or will all available supply be directed to war production so it doesn't matter?

Posted by: radonradar | Jul 4 2023 14:16 utc | 69

Re "A deluded naked fat old man" ..

Prof. Richard Wolf on the situation in the United Clowns of America:

https://youtu.be/4Sa5EtxnIxU

Posted by: blueswede | Jul 4 2023 14:20 utc | 70

Of course the gold standard nut jobs (the loony right) think that's the way China and Russia are going. Sovereign leverage funds ( SLF's) is all you need as long as finance is owned and controlled by the state. Keeps the parasites out.

Liu book - Sovereign Funds: How the Communist Party of China Finances Its Global Ambitions. Provides the definitive account of how wide and how deep China’s sovereign leveraged funds have penetrated global capital markets. Her identification of ‘sovereign leveraged funds’ amounts to a major conceptual breakthrough in the study of global financial flows, bringing to light how any state with the political will and financial engineering prowess can launch a fund to further its strategic interests.

Putin not so much he is a " sound money " balanced budget, gold standard, austerity, free market kinda guy.

China gets it , Russia is playing catch up and will learn the hard way. They always do.

Posted by: Echo Chamber | Jul 4 2023 14:23 utc | 71

"The latest ban did not come as a complete surprise, as the company as early as March had warned that it may be subject to broader export restrictions on advanced chip-making equipment, but it showed that Beijing’s diplomatic efforts with The Hague had fallen on deaf ears."

There is no diplomacy between The Hague (Mark Rutte) with China, nor with Russia for that matter. Mark gets his marching orders from Joe since July 2014, a 4 year interval under the Trump presidency. Washington determines or else you will be hit by tough sanctions. Joe ratchet up a few notches from Jan. 20, 2021 on forward.

Exclusive: ASML chip tool delivery to China delayed amid US ire | Nikkei Asian Review - Nov. 6, 2019 |

Trump Puts Max Pressure On Ally PM Rutte | Jan. 10, 2020 |

Even a Rutte promise to help bomb Iran, won't cut dice in today's dilemma ...

Under Joe Biden busy diplomatic communications with The Hague … Mark as bravest boy in the NATO classroom, doesn’t cut dice.

Biden's Quid pro Quo

A misleading headline as the Biden administration already put sanctions in place to ban the export of ASML's most advanced chip lithography machines to China last year.

No Progress on Netherlands Joining US Chip-Export Ban to China | Voice of America – Jan. 17, 2023 |

History of ASML, the takeover of a US defense chip contractor …

The market reacted as though the ASML-SVG deal hit a snag in Washington. On Monday, ASML's shares fell $1.27 per share to $26.29, while SVG dropped $3.44 to $29.56.

Fearing that the Bush administration will not reach a consensus in the ASML-SVG merger by the midnight deadline, institutional investors yesterday appeared to be selling off their shares in the two lithography companies-and quickly, according to sources in the industry.

Rutte is at the end of his political life in The Hague and clearly hopes to catch a lucrative position in Washington DC ... or to serve on as SG of NATO. Excellent Russophobe credentials.

Posted by: Oui | Jul 4 2023 14:33 utc | 72

@canuck #40

Do you know how China disposes of the waste of its chlorination process? If it really just dumped it in lakes, rivers, creeks and the like, and with a highly polluted water table, then considering China's output of rare earths, the population should have been decimated, which it is not.

So, I cannot believe that they are dumping willy nilly into the environment.

Furthermore, the “environmentally concerned” West is obviously quite happy to buy from China and let the pollution happen there - what a cynical joke.

Posted by: Ernesto Che | Jul 4 2023 14:40 utc | 73

Posted by: unimperator | Jul 4 2023 10:51 utc | 30
Posted by: Passerby | Jul 4 2023 12:14 utc | 45
Posted by: SwissArmyMan | Jul 4 2023 12:35 utc | 52

Let's recap. The G7 does not possess and have never possessed sufficient quantities of labor, gold, oil, gas, coal, sundry rare earth ("critical") minerals needed to maintain "advanced economy" lifestyles, ie. "strategic autonomy," to which generations of their knowledge workers, posing as wage slaves, have become accustomed. The Great Powers have known this for centuries. The "comparative advantage" and "wealth of nations" they claim—the profits captured in each interval of manufacturing intermediate and finished goods demanded by "advanced economies"—begins with war to extract raw materials from perpetually "developing countries" alias emerging markets alias ROW. The extrinsic value of "rare earth" elements such as titanium, ironically abundant in quantity, arises not merely from extracting raw materials from "resource-rich" prisoners of war, but removing from ROW the means to refine, manufacture, and market "titanium" alloy with stultifying antitrust sophistry and free trade admiralty directed at "cash-poor" prisoners of war.
2019

[...]
The rare-earth supply problem will have no easy solutions. According to the U.S. Government Accountability Office, it would take 15 years to overhaul the defense supply chain, meaning that any changes to it need considerable lead time. The American Mineral Security Act, passed in 2015, is meant to determine which minerals are critical and diversify the supply chain, according to the NATO Association of Canada.

Chinese efforts to monopolize LOL! rare earth do not end with domestic sources. China has aggressively pursued rare-earth mines in Africa, often exchanging infrastructure development or the sale of excess defense articles for exclusive mining rights. In the Democratic Republic of the Congo, China gained rights to the country's lithium, cobalt and coltan mines. These minerals are used in electric vehicle batteries and electronics, including smartphones and laptops. In exchange, China agreed to build much-needed projects such as urban roads, highways and hospitals.

Kenya is another Chinese target LOL!. The East African nation has huge mineral potential, and its exploration efforts have picked up in the last five years with the awarding of commercial licenses in prospecting for oil, gold, coal, geothermal minerals and rare earths. In April 2019, Kenya secured $666 million from China to build a data center in a tech city (likely comprising data centers designed to facilitate internet and communications) currently under construction in Konza, about an hour from Nairobi.

Other African countries in China's crosshairs include Cameroon, Angola, Tanzania, and Zambia. Tanzania is of particular interest because of the presence of several military-critical rare earths, including neodymium and praseodymium, which are key components in precision-guided munition technology.

China has also become a significant new economic actor LOL! in Latin America and the Caribbean. China-Latin America trade increased from almost negligible levels in 1990 to $10 billion in 2000 and $270 billion in 2012; the largest portion of this exchange takes place between South America and China. In 2012, an $8.4 billion rare-earth deposit was discovered in Brazil. Over the past few years, China has become Brazil's undisputed top trade partner.
[...]

Posted by: sln2002 | Jul 4 2023 14:42 utc | 74

The problem with metals is that mining takes so many years to build and locks up capital for years with no return. I own shares of a very nice tungsten and future molybdenum miner that's pennies per share and it's a very long wait.

Posted by: Eighthman | Jul 4 2023 12:24 utc | 46

I've watched a few penny mining stocks - Sirius (potash mining in Yorkshire) and a small firm who took over the original Rio Tinto copper mine in Spain 20-odd years ago.

In each case the original shareholders got more and more and more diluted as cash call followed cash call, and ended up (having done most of the work) being bought out cheaply by Glencore-style predators. Good luck!

Posted by: YetAnotherAnon | Jul 4 2023 14:43 utc | 75

Quite sometime ago, India allowed the production of medicine, whether they were patented or not, so the Indians and the countries around it could afford cheap medicine. This most probably wasn't officially acknowledged. Today, It is one of the largest producer of medicine in the world. China too is one of the largest medicine producers in the world, maybe the 2nd in the world. Sure, USA might be the first, but it cannot produce medicine cheaper.

India also producers the largest amount of engineers and doctors for a country. Maybe there are more Indian engineers than the population of Britain.

Now, don't forget about the other countries i the Global South. They produce more educated people than the population of the USA. The status quo will not be. The old colonial countries will wither away in time, EU or NATO or whatnot.

China is shoeing its might. India too. Then there's Brazil, Argentina, South Africa, Iran, Indonesia, etc, etc.

Just imagine, if India would demand the Indians to return home from Britain, or otherwise! Will the British NHS survive?

Posted by: ostro | Jul 4 2023 14:46 utc | 76

China is showing its might. India too. Then there's Brazil, Argentina, South Africa, Iran, Indonesia, etc, etc.

Posted by: ostro | Jul 4 2023 15:08 utc | 77

The USA must be running out of feet to shoot.

Posted by: Pancho Plail | Jul 4 2023 15:08 utc | 78

EU dependency on China raw materials: Preparing for worst-case scenario

..."We cannot change the geology in Europe. So there might be some raw materials where there is potential [nope] to actually ensure that we have a stronger domestic [sic] supply of with primary raw materials," Mark Mistry, senior public policy manager at the Nickel Institute, emphasised....For Julia Poliscanova, Senior Director at the NGO Transport and Environment (T&E), the EU should thus especially focus on the refinement and further processing of critical raw materials.
EU Commission wants [Dr. Evil pinkie] 10% of critical raw materials mined in Europe
[...]
According to the leaked document, "10% of the Union's consumption of strategic raw materials minerals and ores" should be mined in the EU. In addition, [Dr. Evil pinkie] 15% of the Union's annual consumption of each critical raw material should come from recycling, the document reads. The Commission wants to set even higher goals when it comes to the processing of raw materials deemed critical. At least [Dr. Evil pinkie] "40% of the bloc's annual consumption of each strategic imported raw material", should be refined within the bloc.

At the moment, the EU is heavily dependent on importing raw materials it deems critical. The EU is currently 100% dependent on foreign suppliers in 14 out of 27 critical raw materials and is 95% dependent on an additional [Dr. Evil pinkie] three critical raw materials, a report by the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW) showed.
[...]
China Clause
The EU is currently especially dependent on China, which holds a ["]quasi-monopoly["] on many of these critical raw materials. The EU is, for instance, currently importing 93% of its magnesium and 86% of its rare earth metals from China.
[....]
This circumstance is also taken into account in the regulation. To prevent potential supply shortages and to boost resilience, the EU aims to "set a benchmark to not be dependent on one single third country for more than [Dr. Evil pinkie] 70% of imports for any strategic raw material by 2030″.
[...]
Supply shortages from China have already led to disruptions in the European industry in 2021, when China reduced its production [read: extraction and processing] of the material that is essential for the [European] aluminium industry. To lessen [Europe's] dependence [on IMPORTS], the Critical Raw Materials Act is furthermore looking to diversify The European Supply Chain™. To boost diversification and strengthen supply, the Commission also intends to identify [FDI] projects in third countries. To boost these projects abroad, the Commission also aims at supporting them financially via the Global Gateway strategy market—a €300 billion heavy initiative Debt-for-Climate Swap "sustainable" bonds aimed at countering the Chinese belt and road initiative [BRI]. Additionally, large companies are asked to audit their existing supply chains and develop strategies to be better prepared for supply disruptions.

Strategic[Planned] projects
The Critical Raw Materials Act also includes special treatment for projects that are deemed "strategic". These "strategic projects" will be identified by the European Commission together with a European Critical Raw Materials Board that is yet to be established.

Posted by: sln2002 | Jul 4 2023 15:14 utc | 79

"I dont think Russia has any Titanium reserves , most titanium comes from Australia , India , china , Canada , Norway and South Africa , Ukraine has descent titanium reserves but not largest , Russia has none"

You really don't know how to use Google?

https://www.gulf-times.com/story/708846/Aerospace-firms-face-turbulence-in-Russian-titanium-supplies

Posted by: Vineri13 | Jul 4 2023 15:26 utc | 80

The West played with the price of titanium back in 2019 when they wanted a way to hurt Russia. As I recall, scrap titanium was at US$10 a pound in January, 2014. I know for certain that it was at least US$ 5 a pound in late April 2014, and then it suddenly dropped to 50 cents a pound !!! A local metals recycler lost about $ 50,000 on scrap titanium waiting to be picked up by. Scrap metal prices always fluctuates, but not by a factor of ten in a week or two. "Dr. Copper" gets that name because of the volatile price diagnoses the economy, but copper is always priced well inside a 2:1 range and doesn't move too abruptly. If anything, with Russia as a main supplier and resulting uncertainties, the price of titanium should have gone up, not down in 2014. I think the big boys wanted to hurt Russia and had the market tricks to do just that.

I have never seen nor heard of any explanation and I don't know what pricing mechanism is in place. If anyone at the bar knows, please let us know.

BTW, titanium is only moderately hard to cut. Ordinary high-speed tool steel works well if the cutting bits are perfectly sharp (with more "rake" on saw blades), Use lots of coolant, and take it slow because it's not heat conductive. But titanium is more "gummy" than hard. It's only a little worse than stainless steel. I make beautiful hair barettes from sheet Ti, and a propane flame gives it a durable blue tint. It cuts just fine with cheap blades. Hand files quickly dull, and I've found 3M's Cubitron sandpaper (extra sharp stuff, really fantastic) works better than a file.

Posted by: JessDTruth | Jul 4 2023 15:31 utc | 81

Sorry for the type, It was in 2014, NOT in 2019, that the price of titanium plummetted to 40 cents a pond.

Posted by: JessDTruth | Jul 4 2023 15:32 utc | 82

What the US can do in terms of mineral or industrial self sufficiency and what the US will do (that is realistically capable of doing) are very different things. Unless there’s some stepping up of government financing critical projects outside of traditional government property or forcing finance capital to implement them, there simply won’t be new mines or processing facilities or factories. The people in charge of politics and economics are not interested in solutions, especially any that might be difficult, require sacrifice or significant cost.

Never forget that the liquid assets of the USSR were looted by the nomenklatura before the fall of the USSR. You can put a “you are here” pin in your historical map.

Posted by: Lex | Jul 4 2023 15:37 utc | 83

Perhaps China really believes they may be the next country attacked by the US.

In that case, I would expect many more metals etc to be added to their sanction list.

No rare earths, no more new Tomahawks, period.

Posted by: morongobill | Jul 4 2023 15:38 utc | 84

Posted by: ostro | Jul 4 2023 14:46 utc | 77

Cooperation is not well understood. Let me help you understand that the RF is not the only "resource-rich", "cash-poor" nation on the planet, but it is in the vanguard of so-called Global South "situational leadership" that has been preparing since WWII to liberate their peoples from G7 racketeering.

OPEC (1960 FTA): IR, IQ, KW, NG, SA, VZ, LY, AE, DZ, AO, GQ, CG, GA; PLUS OM*, s-SS*, SS*, BN*, RU*, MX*, AZ*, KZ*, MY*, BH*, EC*, ID*, QA*

AU55/OAU(2002/1963 FTA): BI, BJ, CM, CF, CG, CD, GY, GA, ST, CM, DJ, ER, ET, KE, MG, MU, RW, SC, SO, SS, s-SS, TZ, UG, DZ, EG, LY, MR, MA, EH, TN, AO, BW, EZ, LS, MW, MZ, NA, ZA, ZM, BN, BF, CV, CI, GH, GM, GN, GQ, LY, ML, NI, NG, SL, SN, TG, TD; PAPSS (2022): AU55

CARICOM (1965 CARIFTA/2002 FTA): AG, BS, BB, BZ, DM, GD, GY, HT, JM, MS, LC, KN, SV, SR, TT, AI*, BM*, VG*, KY*, TC*

ASEAN (1967 FTA): BN, KH, ID, LA, MY, MM, PH, SG, TH, VN, TL*
EAS (2005 East Asia Summit): CN, RU, IN, KR, ASEAN; US, AU, JP, NZ

OIC (1969 NGO): AZ, AE, IR, IQ, BD, TR, TN, SN, SL, GA, GW, QA, KW, ML, MR, YE, JO, ID, PK, AF, UZ, BH, AL, UG, BN, BJ, TM, BF, TJ, TG, TD, DZ, SA, SS, SY, SR, SO, OM, GM, GY, GN, PS, KM, KG, KZ, CM, CI, LB, LY, MV, MY, EG, MA, MZ, NE, NG

APEC (1989 FTA): CN, CN-hk, CN-tw, RU, ID, SG, VN, TH, PH, MX, PE, CL, BN, PG, MY, KR; US, AU, JP, NZ, CA

CSTO (1992 mil): AM, BY, KZ, KG, TJ, RU

SCO (2001 NGO): CN, RU, IN, PK, KZ, KG, TJ, UZ, IR, AM*, AF*, AZ*, BY*, TR*, LK*, KH*, SA*, EG*, MY*, MV*, KW*, AE*

BRICS (2009 FTA): CN, RU, BR, IN, ZA; AR*, DZ*, EG*, ID*, IR*, CM*, ML*, SN*, TH*, UZ*, FJ*, ET*, KZ*, TN*, BD*

G20 (1999 NGO) FR, DE, IT, ES, JP, UK, US, EU-CO, EU-EC, AU, CA; RU, CN, AR, BR, IN, ID, KR, MX, SA, ZA, TR

EaEU (2012 FTA): AM, BY, KZ, KG, TJ, RU, VN*, CN*, RS*


Posted by: sln2002 | Jul 4 2023 15:45 utc | 85

@ blueswede

"Prof. Richard Wolf on the situation in the United Clowns of America:

https://youtu.be/4Sa5EtxnIxU"

This guy is part of the clown show. Usual class differentiation practices. Paid political shill. Academic moron. Gets a few things right. Cerainly Ukraine was a momentous mistake. He is really the epitome of delusion the "left" version. The right and left are equally deluded. Creating anger really is not helpful as we see in France. At its base the delusion is entitlement and its base is in belief in $ value. this "PROF" why is he worth 1/4 mil a year?

This is the delusion. There is a big store of resources. Money is simply a reflection of those resources. If standard of living ios not high its unjust and therefore force is just if you dont get what you want.

At this point there is very little productivity and resources in the USA to justify its standard of living but a considerable amount of force capability.
You can point the finger at the 1% but all standard of living is artificial and all standard of living is based on force capability. The USA is the 1% on a world wide basis. This prof is the 1% on a world wide basis. There are no easy solutions but the start is to reduce force capability. If things are fair you dont need all that force. Sure a reasonable amount to self preservation. The trouble is USA is hollowed out from the inside. All this anger. If your angry you cant work and be productive. But hey lets burn it all down. Force application for standard of living worship on both the macro and micro. This prof is part of the solution not the problem.

Ukraine will result in a strategic nuclear exchange. Of course it would be much much better if it didnt. The dollar value is force application at this point. If that capacity is diminished the dollar value is diminished. So yes if I was king the USA would get the hell out of the force application business and we can pick up the pieces. The pieces are really small at this point. Then the micro burns everything down. Anger certainly wont help us pick up the pieces nor will worship of force application to determine standard of living on a micro level like we see in France. Frances basic problem is imaginary money creation and force worship to determine standard of living just like the USA. Force application to determine standard of living results in strategic nuclear exchange in the macro. Force application to determine standard of living in the micro results in burning everything down. And it all is based on entitlement via this or that. All arguments for entitlement are arguments for force application to determine standard of living. The start of justice is the reduction of force capability. No one wants justice in the USA besides this silly old dog. Certainly not that high dollar Prof creating anger and pointing fingers.

Justice? Start with force capability reduction. 11 aircraft carriers is BS. Try to transition to something else that determines standard of living. Not going to happen. The question is do we burn in the macro or micro? I say the micro is better. Better to not take the world down with us. Let south America and Africa and Vietnam have a chance. Pipe dream. It will be strategic nuclear exchange. sillydog

Posted by: sillydog | Jul 4 2023 15:52 utc | 86

sillydog | Jul 4 2023 15:52 utc | 87

Let south America and Africa and Vietnam have a chance. Pipe dream. It will be strategic nuclear exchange.

That will affect the Northern Hemisphere much more than the Southern. Uruguay = New Switzerland. Some young educated Brits are making lives out there now.

Posted by: YetAnotherAnon | Jul 4 2023 16:11 utc | 87

You really don't know how to use Google?
Posted by: Vineri13 | Jul 4 2023 15:26 utc | 81

The search engine that blocks, or "curates," academic and commercial publishers flagged by mal/mis/disinformation authorities of the free world? The "information service provider" whose selection algorithms are ruled by paying advertisers and Digital Rights Management? That Google?

Here's what you need to understand about the life of information. Nothing is free, not even inaccurate information such as "reserve" or "proven reserve" estimates which rise and fall according to phase of the moon and the number of "analysts" who compile obsolete data released by competing commercial operators seeking "forward looking" contracts.

Posted by: sln2002 | Jul 4 2023 16:15 utc | 88

@Oui | Jul 4 2023 14:33 utc | 73
re: There is no diplomacy between The Hague (Mark Rutte) with China, nor with Russia for that matter. Mark gets his marching orders from Joe since July 2014, a 4 year interval under the Trump presidency. Washington determines or else you will be hit by tough sanctions.

Yes. That's what US embassies are for, to threaten the host nation into doing what Washington expects them to do, in accordance with the US "rules-based international order."

Posted by: Don Bacon | Jul 4 2023 16:31 utc | 89

Just imagine, if India would demand the Indians to return home from Britain, or otherwise! Will the British NHS survive?

The NHS is already failing, partly because of the demands placed upon it, including by ongoing immigration, which has reintroduced diseases previously eliminated in the UK eg TB, partly because it keeps trying to provide services which it was not intended to perform eg gender reassignment surgery, and partly because it has become excessively politicised, bureaucratic, and has lost it's focus on 'core business'.
If all Indians left Britain, it would cause disruption in the NHS, but it would also reduce the workload of the NHS, since Indians get sick, have babies, and grow old, just like the rest of us.

Posted by: Al Batross | Jul 4 2023 16:32 utc | 90

Posted by: sillydog | Jul 4 2023 15:52 utc | 87

Wolff gets the police shooting issue so blatantly wrong it makes me wonder what else he's wrong about. All one has to do is look at the washington post database of police shootings (I'm surprised it's still available). 18 unarmed black men shot by police in 2018. Not 18k, or 1800, or 180....18. Out of tens if not hundreds of thousands of police encounters. While I'm not shocked at this point, it certainly is shameful that an "academic" could spew such utter nonsense about white cops shooting black men, as if it were some sort of epidemic.

Posted by: Frank McGar | Jul 4 2023 16:36 utc | 91

all these posts listed below, i found useful and informative.. thanks folks and thanks for the article b..

unimperator | Jul 4 2023 10:58 utc | 31

canuck | Jul 4 2023 11:52 utc | 40

oldhippie | Jul 4 2023 11:59 utc | 41

William Gruff | Jul 4 2023 12:09 utc | 43

Lex | Jul 4 2023 15:37 utc | 84

Posted by: james | Jul 4 2023 16:36 utc | 92

18 unarmed black men shot by police in 2018.
Posted by: Frank McGar | Jul 4 2023 16:36 utc | 93

Correction: 18 killed in 2020, 22 killed in 2018.

Posted by: Frank McGar | Jul 4 2023 16:39 utc | 93

Posted by: Dr. George W Oprisko | Jul 4 2023 13:48 utc | 65

China is forging dominance in a new paradigm of advanced chips.....Based upon Gallium-Arsenide... and other exotics....

Could you please give a cite for the relevance of GaAs? The last I heard of the technology for computing, as opposed to sensors, was in the late 1980s.

Here is an article from 1990 saying that GaAs just cannot compete with silicon, because it is a beast to work with. Not to mention that handling the Arsenic is another big headache. Given how complex the silicon fabrication tech has gotten - FinFets, Gate-all-around, and other exotic geometries - GaAs is a non-starter at nanometer scale.

Chip Makers Cope With Tiny Market : Technology: Gallium arsenide manufacturers narrow their focus because the industry failed to boom as expected.

By JAMES F. PELTZ
July 17, 1990 12 AM PT

the estimates of gallium arsenide’s market--one research firm predicted sales would reach $13 billion by 1994--proved absurdly optimistic. Sales this year will total only about $100 million. Among other things, gallium arsenide turned out to be a much more difficult material to handle than silicon in making chips, and today no one believes gallium arsenide will replace silicon in semiconductors.

Gallium arsenide “is more brittle, for example, than silicon so it breaks a lot easier,” said Spencer J. Brown, president of GigaBit Logic Inc. in Newbury Park. GigaBit, along with Vitesse Semiconductor Corp. in Camarillo, are two of the leading gallium arsenide chip makers. “It took several years for the engineers to figure out how to fully utilize the material. It’s just taken practice, time and practice,” Brown said.
Practice makes perfect, but it doesn’t necessarily make for a profit. Vitesse, founded in 1984, didn’t turn its first profitable quarter until this year’s first quarter. GigaBit, started in 1981, had to lay off workers in some of its early years, was briefly profitable in 1987-88, but is again posting losses.

So the companies are refocusing their visions to adapt to gallium arsenide’s minor role in the semiconductor industry.


Posted by: john brewster | Jul 4 2023 16:44 utc | 94

China owns about 12% of US debt, almost trillion dollars:
https://www.npr.org/2022/08/23/1119126863/chinas-slice-of-the-us-debt-pie

"In 2021, U.S. exports to China were $151.1 billion, a 21.4% ($26.6 billion) increase from 2020; U.S. imports from China were $506.4 billion, a 16.5% ($71.6 billion) increase; and the trade deficit with China was $355.3 billion, a 14.5% ($45.0 billion) increase from $310.3 billion in 2020.
China was the United States’ third-largest trade partnerin 2021. In2021,8.6% of total U.S. exports of$1.8 trillion to the World were exported to China and 17.9% of total U.S. imports of $2.8 trillion were imported from China."

https://www.bis.doc.gov/index.php/country-papers/2971-2021-statistical-analysis-of-u-s-trade-with-china/file#:~:text=China%20has%20the%20third%20largest,trillion%20were%20imported%20from%20China.

China could break this country.

Posted by: bill wolfe | Jul 4 2023 16:54 utc | 95

Could you please give a cite for the relevance of GaAs?

Posted by: john brewster | Jul 4 2023 16:44 utc | 96

---

Power transistors ==> https://www.nxp.com/products/radio-frequency/rf-amplifiers-low-medium-power/wideband-amplifiers/gaas-linear-power-transistors:RF-GAAS-LINEAR-POWER-TRANSISTOR

Also in switching circuits ==> https://eepower.com/technical-articles/the-role-of-gaas-diodes-in-high-performance-power-conversion

Posted by: too scents | Jul 4 2023 16:54 utc | 96

Gallium combined with Arsenic (Gallium Arsenide, GaAs) is what's used in microwave amplifiers (think Ku, Ka, C-band, et al). Those are the amplifiers (LNA or LNB: low noise amplifier/block converter)that stand out front of parabolic dishes. They represent the first stage of signal processing/down conversion. Those GaAs transistors convert GHz signals down to lower frequency, MHz, signals. The higher quality Ga gets translated to a lower temperature amplifier - they're usually rated in degrees Kelvin, the lower the better.

Posted by: zeke2u | Jul 4 2023 16:56 utc | 97

You can figure out how to make semiconductor chips but you can't create minerals.

China is punching below the belt.

Gallium and Germanium is used almost everywhere in electronics from fiber optic transceivers, LED/laser diodes to infrared sensors.

Will the west find alternative sources of GA and Germanium or galvanize academic research institutions to research & develop electronic components that do not use these materials?

There is wealth of knowledge in US universities that could develop and ship electronics that use different raw materials. As just ONE example, the graphene transistor was invented at Stanford. "But, but mass producing consumer microchips that use revolutionarily new transistors takes time". Continuing the example, the graphene transistor was invented in 2008, 13 years ago. If there was investment along with a patient, disciplined plan implemented then, we'd have seen the result by now.

Instead, money chased get rich quick schemes like interent apps that do mundane things (but over the internet!!) like talking to friends (facebook & other social media), hotels (airbnb), taxi (uber), book store/mall (amazon), bank (paypal) and myriad of other things which had their valuations inflated with overly pompous pretentious snobbery that's characteristic of silicon valley.

But I doubt this is what we'd see since if that were the case, US chip companies like Intel would already be ahead of TSMC.

The United States, as well as Europe, is an unstoppable snowball headed straight towards being a 5th world sh1t hole. It may take some time to get there, but that's the current direction.

Posted by: FieryButMostPeaceful | Jul 4 2023 16:58 utc | 98

Russia is the 5th largest exporter of titanium in the world and one of the US major suppliers.

It would be nice if commenters checked their assertions before visiting nonsense on everyone else.

Posted by: Finius | Jul 4 2023 16:58 utc | 99

Russian titanium #5
I don't know what they have either. But this looks like a good place to start.

https://www.highnorthnews.com/en/russian-mining-company-partners-china-develop-massive-titanium-deposit-arctic

Posted by: JohnT | Jul 4 2023 17:05 utc | 100

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