Moon of Alabama Brecht quote
July 06, 2022

Will Johnson Finally Fall?

Let me admit that I do not understand the details of the political process within British parties. So I do not know if the Tories can force Boris Johnson out of Downíng Street No. 10 or not.

Over the last 24 hours some 26 government officials from his party resigned over the latest of his many lies:

The current row is the scandal over Dickensianly-named Charles Pincher. But Johnson had already taken another hit when and both seats they had held, one previously considered safe, the other snatched from Labour in 2019. It didn’t help that Johnson seemed more interested in bolstering Zelensky than fellow MPs, or that he was in Rwanda the day of the special elections.

Pincher resigned from the post of deputy chief whip on June 30 due to allegations of sexual misconduct. No. 10 claimed that Johnson had not known Pincher had faced charges of similar impropriety in 2019, at the Foreign Office. That story blew up over the weekend.

But Johnson seems unimpressed:

Mr Johnson defied calls to resign despite the scathing attack and a fresh wave of ministerial resignations and signs that support from Tory backbenchers is ebbing away.

The prime minister told MPs the “colossal mandate” he had been handed in 2019 meant he should keep going despite the “difficult circumstances”.

Later today the 1922 Committee, the parliament group of the conservatives, will vote on some rule changes that should allow to vote Boris out by next week.

Kitty Donaldson @kitty_donaldson - 10:20 UTC · Jul 6, 2022

EXC: The 1922 Committee will meet at 5 pm and if it's quorate in favour of changing the leadership rules it will do so and there could be a ballot on Johnson's leadership next week.

But what happens when he does not move even after that happens?

During the 2019 Brexit fight in the conservative party several Tories voted against Johnson's course. He threw them out of the party and arranged for new election which he then won by a good margin.

Mikey Smith @mikeysmith - 12:22 UTC · Jul 6, 2022

Well-placed source convinced Boris Johnson won’t quit, even if the 22 change the rules, and he loses a VONC.

Instead, he’ll claim he has a mandate from 14m voters, and will threaten to force an election - but not before deselecting everyone who voted against him.

Could he now try something similar?

He probably could but by now the Tories would likely lose a general election. Energy prices are through the roof and few can still afford to pay for them.

Johnson is the billionaires useful idiot. Their donations have put and kept him in office. But even they will at some point cut their support and select some other corrupt but populous idiot to do what they says.

That may even be Ken Starmer, the current Labour leader who has castrated the party of any radical thought by throwing out its Corbyn supporters.

The policy differences between 'moderate Tories' and the defanged Labour are smaller than many perceive. A Prime Minister Starmer might well turn out to be just another liar like Tony Blair.

Two world wars and the Suez crisis have destroyed Britain's imperial state. Brexit has finished it off:

Brexit was just a convulsion, as the United Kingdom went through the psychological trauma of accepting its change in status from great power to reasonably senior European state. There is a great treatise to be written on this and the consequent wave of populist English nationalism.

You may like to note the constant Tory use of the phrase “world-leading” in risible circumstances, the fact that even yesterday Starmer felt the need to comment on government collapse while planted between three Union Jacks, the constant militarism and fetishisation of the armed forces on TV, and the desire for reflected glory by fighting a great war to the blood of the very last Ukrainian.
...
Johnson is just a part of a process. As the power of an Empire disintegrates, so do its mores. Since the second world war, over sixty states have become independent of British rule.
...
As the UK’s military, economic and political power have collapsed, so have its political mores – both for good and for bad. Johnson is but a turd spewed to the top of the gushing sewer of British decline.

It was Boris Johnson who at the end of March pressed the Ukrainian president Zelensky into ending negotiations with Russia and into prolonging the war in his country.

That was a crime for which both should receive severe punishment. A shameful forced removal from office is not sufficient as such.

Posted by b on July 6, 2022 at 15:33 UTC | Permalink

Comments
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"Two world wars and the Suez crisis have destroyed Britain's imperial state. Brexit has finished it off"

Actually, it was the total failure of implementing Brexit that finished it off.

Posted by: Norwegian | Jul 6 2022 15:41 utc | 1

Johnson sadly is a reflection of what passes for an astute politician in our digitised environment. A man for whom the end always justifies the means, a man who hoodwinked an overburdened and underinformed British society that the was a lovable affable sometimes bumbling friendly neighbourhood trickster whose intentions may be mischievous but never harmful or dastardly. Saddle the people with enough problems merely to exist and they will be subsumed by the onerous job of merely existing. The people have been convinced that things really cant be made any better no matter who is in charge so best just let the man currently in there get on with it. The opposition leader Starmer is cut out of the exact same cloth. Outwardly demure but similarly without principles or scruples. Only difference from BoJo is that Starmer owns a comb and uses it each morning on his hair

Posted by: DaVinci | Jul 6 2022 15:49 utc | 2

He will go if he hasn’t already. I do not think Brexit broke Britain in way the Covid farrago has, and it would hard to identify a Western European nation which is faring better within the EU under the current globalist assault. Johnson’s infantilism over Ukraine has been bad but he has apparently the entire House of Commons on-side over that.

Posted by: John Stone | Jul 6 2022 15:49 utc | 3

"finally" doesn't make a lot of sense in regards to a UK Prime Minister. "fall" could just mean the Tories get a replacement for him. The tories might still hold the House in a snap election. And even if the Tories lose, Johnson could remain party leader, and be prime minister again some time later. I don't see how Johnson's career could wind up permanently over anytime soon.

Posted by: Inkan1969 | Jul 6 2022 15:51 utc | 4

Brexit was supposed to free the U.K. from overreaching European dictats. Turns out the E.U. is a much more fearsome enemy from the outside. Now the survival of the U.K. itself is at stake, because long settled issues have burst forth in NI and Scotland, and everyone is taking stock of the status quo.

There never was any "successful" implementation of Brexit in the cards outside of leading many other important powers out of the E.U. and killing it.

Posted by: Cesare | Jul 6 2022 15:53 utc | 5

we have a similar system in canadia and last time the parliament tried to have a serious "no confidence" vote, the PM at the time simply shut it down.

https://www.ndp.ca/news/harper-run-accountability-shuts-down-parliament-fourth-time

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/pm-shuts-down-parliament-until-march-1.829800

it's not sustainable, obviously. those kind of stupid, arrogant actions gave us the current french whore running the place. basically they replaced the canadian bush with the canadian obama. starmer is a stuffed suit and will make an ideal placeholder for the actual owners of british society.

Posted by: the pair | Jul 6 2022 15:54 utc | 6

I did not know you were Canadian, the Pair!

Posted by: Reading Junkie | Jul 6 2022 15:55 utc | 7

The Conservative Party has a rule where a party leader (i.e. Boris) can only be challenged once in a 12 month period, so since Boris survived a no confidence vote about a month ago he is supposedly safe from another no confidence vote for another 11 months. HOWEVER, there is nothing stopping the party members from just changing the rules and allowing another no confidence vote against Boris. More importantly in Boris's prior no confidence vote he only won 211 out of 359 votes (about 59% of the vote), in British politics, historically wining a no confidence vote by less than 60% is the kiss of death and usually means the leader "decides to resign" within the year. I would also add that Boris actually pushed for the original no confidence vote to ensure this control of the party and almost certainly knew that more disastrously bad news was coming down the pipeline so many of his "supporters" during that vote probably feel lied to and are out for blood (but only in the finest British tradition of behind close doors in the back). now that so many cabinet minsters are resigning in mass and Boris will probably find it impossible to fill all of those posts (because the party membership is boycotting Boris's leadership) Boris will probably announce a resignation within a week or so and then stay on as leader until a new party leadership election is held (which could take several months).

Posted by: Kadath | Jul 6 2022 15:56 utc | 8

Brexit was supposed to free the U.K. from overreaching European dictats. Turns out the E.U. is a much more fearsome enemy from the outside. Now the survival of the U.K. itself is at stake, because long settled issues have burst forth in NI and Scotland, and everyone is taking stock of the status quo.

There never was any "successful" implementation of Brexit in the cards outside of leading many other important powers out of the E.U. and killing it.

EU was a suicide pact to begin with.

Posted by: Ian Kummer | Jul 6 2022 15:58 utc | 9

British stuff today, how nice!

I can only say please, Boris, stay put! Not because I like Boris Johnson, but because a snap election might very well result in a PM Starmer. That should be avoided like the plague. If Johnson is the billionaires useful idiot, Keir Starmer is the idiots' (read: MI5) useless idiot. A non-entity for a Manchurian Candidate.

Brexit seems like a wise thing to have done, especially in hindsight. The whole west is nosediving, but the EU fastest. With Britain having disentangled themselves from the Prison of Peoples, they at least have some souvereignty with which to manage the crash. Earlier today I saw that the USD is almost at parity with the EUR. I got 0.9755 EUR for a USD. THat's unheard of, but there you go. How's the Pound doing?

Posted by: Scotch Bingeington | Jul 6 2022 15:59 utc | 10

That was a crime for which both should receive severe punishment. A shameful forced removal from office is not sufficient as such.

Not even the beginning of sufficient. Also a clown like Johnson is incapable of shame.

If it does happen, I guess it will be a marginal improvement to see him out. Just to discourage the trend for this personality type among heads of state elsewhere.

I also don't know much about UK politics, but I don't expect any fundamental changes from a potential successor. Neither in terms of less belligerent foreign policy, nor even in terms of competence. What normal person would want to be the face of UK in the coming year or two? They are about to eat another Covid wave, plus the inflation (yet to hit its full magnitude), plus a direct energy crisis, plus probably the worst economic crisis in Europe in decades, plus good chance of losing Scotland.

Posted by: ptb | Jul 6 2022 16:02 utc | 11

He has been ambushed by the Cabinet - it would be remarkable if he did not go today.

Posted by: John Stone | Jul 6 2022 16:02 utc | 12

Posted by: Inkan1969 | Jul 6 2022 15:51 utc | 4

He did demonstrate some Houdinian skills before but Houdini himself ended up tragically. In my opinion he is a dead man walking. Britain is entering a devastating recession and no potential prime minister is rushing to take the job. Even obeying Brits will stage a rebellion this time. And the worst thing for BoJo is that Putin is sitting somewhere in Kremlin and laughs out loud.

Posted by: Milos | Jul 6 2022 16:02 utc | 13

If they decide to change Boris, how about Carrie Symonds as the new PM? At least that would cut down the redecorating costs in number ten.

***

The "planned disaster" is Starmer, as he represents more "law and order" and surveillance. He is also one that believes in the elimination of opposition, particularly in his "own" party.

Posted by: Stonebird | Jul 6 2022 16:14 utc | 14

Not having yet read the links that b embedded, I still thought I should post these couple of comments. On YouTube, the two latest videos from Number 10 Downing Street are “Happy Birthday to the National Health System” and “Johnson announces the biggest tax cut in a decade”. And then the ministers of health and finance resign, I think?

MK Bhadrakumar also tweeted about Johnson today:
“Erdogan stole the thunder from Johnson who was all dressed up & raring to send UK warships to Black Sea to confront Russian ships. Of course, Turkey will also make some money on the side, as middle man "re-exporting" Ukr wheat to world market! Why not?”

https://twitter.com/BhadraPunchline/status/1544598040895700994

[Why not? Rhetorical or is he inviting responses?]

Posted by: Bruised Northerner | Jul 6 2022 16:14 utc | 15

Key question is whether there are any effective moves now to wrest the party from the WEF. There was a major rebellion over lockdown over the winter: there will be some who want to return to libertarian traditions.

Posted by: John Stone | Jul 6 2022 16:15 utc | 16

The political party rules whereby the general party members choose the leader rather than the elected representatives is problematic.
- Leadership candidates make promises to members that they cannot keep
- Anyone can become a member, meaning recruiting new members is job #1
- Elected Caucus members are in a far better position to assess the party/team leadership skills of candidates.

A better process would be for the Elected Caucus members to select the Leader and Deputy, and then have that choice ratified by say 60% the general membership.

I recently joined the Canadian Conservative Party to help prevent them from snatching defeat from the jaws of victory, as they did with their past two leadership choices. No way Trudeau should have formed a government in the past two elections, after losing the popular vote.

Posted by: Opport Knocks | Jul 6 2022 16:19 utc | 17

UK Parliament is going to have its summer holidays (Parliamentary recess) on 21 july
it seems Conservatives are intent on getting rid of Johnson well before then, (all the bigwigs have indicated as much)
and they will need time to elect a new leader before the recess, which will probably take a week or so.

besides oddschecker has odds of Johnson leaving this year at 1/12 odds-on

Posted by: chris m | Jul 6 2022 16:20 utc | 18

Jessica Elgot @jessicaelgot

New - 1922 committee will not change rules tonight. Elections for the new committee will take place with results Monday night. Rules could then change by Tuesday.

Posted by: b | Jul 6 2022 16:22 utc | 19

Time for the Labor guy Corbyn to finally get his chance, whose reputation they had destroyed with lies about antisemitism.

Posted by: Nico | Jul 6 2022 16:27 utc | 20

May started a leadership process which took a miserable two months - it might be reduced a little, or if lots of people withdraw because there is clear front-runner it may be quicker, as in 2016 when the rival Brexiteers destroyed each other, and suddenly it was May uncontested. Presumably Raab, deputy PM, would be caretaker.

Posted by: John Stone | Jul 6 2022 16:27 utc | 21

A clown nation gets the clown leader it deserves.

Posted by: nook | Jul 6 2022 16:31 utc | 22

EU was a suicide pact to begin with.

Posted by: Ian Kummer | Jul 6 2022 15:58 utc | 9

There always were a lot of anti-EU nutters on this blog. People not bright enough to understand the prosperity the EU has brought to Europe, however ideologically unsound the institution may be. People who can't understand why it is that Brexit is a failure, intrinsically so, not because it was badly done. It is true that the present leaders are idiots, but one should never make the mistake of confusing the present post-holders with the institution itself.

On the other hand, Johnson is coming close to destroying Britain as a country all on his own. There are not many capable of doing that.

Posted by: laguerre | Jul 6 2022 16:34 utc | 23

"It was Boris Johnson who at the end of March pressed the Ukrainian president Zelensky into ending negotiations with Russia and into prolonging the war in his country.

"That was a crime for which both should receive severe punishment. A shameful forced removal from office is not sufficient as such."

b on July 6, 2022 at 15:33 UTC
______

Hear! Hear! Ditto for US criminals.

Posted by: Doug Hillman | Jul 6 2022 16:35 utc | 24

confusing the present post-holders with the institution itself.
@laguerre | Jul 6 2022 16:34 utc | 23

---

It is not confusing at all, that a neoliberal institution should be filled with neoliberals.

Posted by: too scents | Jul 6 2022 16:41 utc | 25

As far as the collective West is concerned, it does not matter who falls or rises among the ruling class, they are all a heap of garbage. It is "gigo = garbage in garbage out" all over the West.

Posted by: Steve | Jul 6 2022 16:43 utc | 26

The political situation in the UK will be agravated by the fact the Norwegian offshore workers strike may result in the cessation, or curtailment, of present NG and oil flows from Norway North Sea production to UK.

Any such curtailment, or cessation, would impact all transport costs and electrical costs and would therefore feed through into the broader economy ss a series of inflationary shocks.

Coupled with BoJo having incited 404 to continued war and supplied 404 with aramaments paid out of UK citizen taxes while at the same time reducing citizen NHS benefits, it is difficult to see the elctorate returning Bojo to power.

Of course were the Conservatives to run Z as their leader they would win in a landslide!! Viva 404.

Posted by: Sushi | Jul 6 2022 16:46 utc | 27

IMO, The Queen has had enough of Bojo; he's just too much of an embarrassment to remain in his post and has already served his purpose. Starmer will become PM and be no different than Blair. The Queen needs a stronger personage as the struggle with Russia continues, which is one her soul needs to win for she remains the traditional Royal Fascist who "knows best."

Barflies must ask themselves, Why does the UK seem to have so much say over Ukraine all out of proportion to its actual strength as a power? Note how Bojo never gets negative Outlaw US Empire media reactions, and ask why is that. There are other oddities as well. IMO, they all add up to the conclusion that the UK isn't just another vassal of the Outlaw US Empire but a genuine partner in its crimes--more than mere lieutenant--and that's what Brexit was mostly about--freeing UK from EU restrictions on its sovereignty. The Outlaw Anglo-American Empire's Unilateralism is plain to see as it thumbs its nose at the UN Charter and International Law. 1984's Oceania is now reality. We'll now see just how much further our world becomes like the book's narrative. On that note, IMO it's wise to reflect on William Gruff's logic on nuke use by the Neoliberalcons, although I do have a reply for him that I'll post to that thread.

Posted by: karlof1 | Jul 6 2022 16:50 utc | 28

Some people bet on Rishi. Any opinion about him?

Posted by: RB | Jul 6 2022 16:55 utc | 29

A clown nation gets the clown leader it deserves.
Posted by: nook | Jul 6 2022 16:31 utc | 22

Yes, he's been overdoing things a little lately. But, remember the lovely national health system he'll leave behind with all the money flowing in now that earlier was sucked into the deep EU pockets. ;)

Posted by: LeaNder | Jul 6 2022 16:58 utc | 30

thanks b...

everything is optics and hollywood now.... i'm sure the billionaires can always find another useful idiot... the political ranks are full of them.. so on with the show while the billionaires figure out what to do with this circus called democracy... on the other hand - i always think the system is coming unglued... we'll see.. for all i know boris continues on and this is just another drama episode for those addicted to drama...

Posted by: james | Jul 6 2022 17:00 utc | 31

Posted by: Opport Knocks | Jul 6 2022 16:19 utc | 17

I did the same and also joined the CPC.

Given the poor quality of representative government under the rule of party loyalty and discipline, the only postive response is to vote the incumbent out of office each election.

The other positive change would be to outlaw political parties. A second positive change would be to remove all pension benefit if it is found that an elected offical failed to act in good faith during his term in office.

I never had the opportunity to express my opinion to my M.P regarding the millions of CDN dollars in transfers to 404. This support in both on-the-ground assistance, millions in weapons, renders Canada a co-belligerant. Nice to have a say on becoming exposed to being burnt to a cinder if someone pushes the wrong button. The only worse fate would be to not be burnt to a cinder.

As optimistic as a raw fish can be,
Cheers!

Trudeau is a wanker but we are going to be paying him a healthy pension for decades to come.

Posted by: Sushi | Jul 6 2022 17:02 utc | 32

"Why does the UK seem to have so much say over Ukraine all out of proportion to its actual strength as a power?"

Financially, with many tax havens, the UK holds an enormous amount of wealth. With the US, around 60% of the world's wealth between the two. I watched a documentary on YouTube recently about the UK and it's tax havens, although it's something I've been aware of for a few years now.

Posted by: BorisForgetMeNot | Jul 6 2022 17:03 utc | 33

@ karlof1 question - "Barflies must ask themselves, Why does the UK seem to have so much say over Ukraine all out of proportion to its actual strength as a power?"

transfer of the image of power from uk to usa back whenever, but these 2 are tied at the hip... bush and blair iraq 2003 and etc. etc... these 2 have never been separate when it comes to the money.... it is all about the money and power.. i agree with the rest of your conclusions as well.... the city of london, and wall st - 2 different branches of the same banking cartel... the queen fits right in!

Posted by: james | Jul 6 2022 17:08 utc | 34

the spiders web - youtube documentary on the city of london gives a bit of an eye opener... as b notes - just let the billionaires find another useful idiot..

Posted by: james | Jul 6 2022 17:10 utc | 35

Craig Murray has posted up The Death of the British Imperial State

Posted by: too scents | Jul 6 2022 17:25 utc | 36

@karlof1

Yes, I suspect the British public are also getting quite fed up with the Royal Family - it is certainly hard to look up to them but them, and even the Prince of Wales is very damaged goods, only perhaps a nose ahead of Prince Andrew. Again they are very signed up to the Great Reset (which is Constitution unacceptable).
https://www.princeofwales.gov.uk/thegreatreset

Posted by: John Stone | Jul 6 2022 17:27 utc | 37

Thanks for the replies! Yes, it's all about the lucre. The UK/US defines the Neoliberal Axis with the UK infiltrating the US in the late 19th Century, and despite all the humiliations over the last 120+ years, the UK--City of London and most importantly the Royal House--has been able to keep its influence and place as loyal Lieutenant. But the roots of the relationship go back to the initial Plantation and QE1.

Posted by: karlof1 | Jul 6 2022 17:28 utc | 38

"Will Johnson Finally Fall?"

Regardless, just watching british parliment sessions, is the best standup, or sitting comedy act anywhere.. lol.. I say, keep him there!!!!

Posted by: Rd | Jul 6 2022 17:30 utc | 39

Maybe Johnson can find some solace in this magnificent song: Heading For A Fall. I know I did. Americans probably don't know it. But people like B perhaps? The group was Belgian. So that's what Belgium can be. Perhaps as a comment of sorts on laguerre's #23 (EU): all too often, Belgium is more like Marc Dutroux and Guy Verhofstadt, in my eyes.

---

karlof1 | Jul 6 2022 16:50 utc | 28

Yes, we do. Great comment. Mysterious Albion! How do they manage to pull off shit like Sarin in Syria, the White Helmets, MH17, Bellingcat, the Skripals, Navalny. It's Britain everywhere.

---

Stonebird | Jul 6 2022 16:14 utc | 14

"Carrie Symonds as the new PM? At least that would cut down the redecorating costs in number ten."

Not sure I've heard the name before. Who is she, and why no redecorating costs with her?

How about Amber Rudd? She was clever enough to leave the May government and not get into Johnson's...

Posted by: Scotch Bingeington | Jul 6 2022 17:33 utc | 40

Of course Johnson will go. But I am at a loss to understand why there needs to be an election- snap or otherwise. If he resigns the Tories still retain a majority, very few of whom will want an election. So they simply nominate a placeholder, whom the Queen asks to form a government, and the set about the dirty business of finding Elizabeth May's replacement.
To defeat him on a motion of No Confidence will require large numbers of abstentions or votes against him in the Commons. But there is no possibility of the Queen sending for Starmer unless of course he or one of the Tartan Tories, runs for the Conservative leadership. Starmer seems a bit colourless for the Tories, however.


It is hard to see what laguerre@23 means by this unless he is demonstrating the nature of circular logic:
"..There always were a lot of anti-EU nutters on this blog. People not bright enough to understand the prosperity the EU has brought to Europe, however ideologically unsound the institution may be.
People who can't understand why it is that Brexit is a failure, intrinsically so, not because it was badly done. It is true that the present leaders are idiots, but one should never make the mistake of confusing the present post-holders with the institution itself."

He confesses that the EU is "ideologically unsound".
A democrat would go further it is actually and practically unsound- its decisions are taken by unaccountable ideologues for whom neo-liberalism is a religion and imperialism their best friend. Institutions run by bureaucrats working for banks and generally trained to advance the interests of the United States add up to the EU itself. To replace these "placeholders" democracy- including respect for referenda and the election/recall of decision makers- is necessary. To get it would involve a thorough dismantling of the current institutions and a new constitution.
Happily the job of dismantling is being done as we speak-by the Russian armed forces and their allies.

Johnson was correct about Brexit. The British people had voted quite clearly in favour of it. That should be the end of the story, leaving only the means of withdrawing to be discussed.
laguerre of course knows better. Maybe the British people should consider him as successor to the current Queen and re-write the constitution to give him the ultimate power in matters of importance. He could choose the title of James III, though it wouldn't surprise me to learn that he considered it already taken.

Posted by: bevin | Jul 6 2022 17:40 utc | 41

Looking at the spreading chaos that the "west" has created it is possible that the "west" may create an "incident" that ALL the current western leaders will use in unison to take authoritarian control of their respective countries.

The reason I say this is possible, is because they all seem to be doing the same things which are creating rising public opposition. The danger for the "group" of western leaders is that once one government falls, this will create a domino effect - and as a group this will be the end of the alliance.

They have backed themselves against a wall and they must act in unison if they are to survive.

Danger is ahead!

Posted by: James Cook | Jul 6 2022 17:43 utc | 42

The United States and the European Union send arms to Ukraine; while claiming innocence when these arms are used.
As an example, the US has given Russian-made MiG helicopters to Ukraine, originally purchased by the US for the Afghan army.
Could Russia do something similar?
As an example, if Russia gave Iran or North Korea US-made Javelin anti-tank or Stinger anti-air missiles, could Russia convincingly claim innocence when these arms are used, citing Ukraine as precedent?

Posted by: Walkabout | Jul 6 2022 17:47 utc | 43

I see that b linked Craig Murray below the fold.

Also, it is amazing how a sex scandal has kicked the Northern Ireland Protocol into the tall grass.

Posted by: too scents | Jul 6 2022 17:55 utc | 44

Leaders of the three main parties are selected through various processes laid down in their constitutions - generally a popularity contest. Which ever party wins the election, the party leader becomes prime minister - who then goes on to select his (chosen toadies) as cabinet ministers. If a sufficient number of government MP's lose confidence in the Prime Minister, an pole is taken which RARELY goes anywhere. On the VERY RARE occasion a new pole for party leader occurs but RARELY anyone is prepared to stand against the incumbent. If a no hope, washed up back bencher has the balls to stand, and gets sufficient votes, it can trigger a second ballot when better contenders stand and generally win party leadership. But this is very rare indeed. But like the USA, the established parties have grown from nothing.

At any time a Prime Minister (or party leader) can resign, if they have lost the stomach to fight on. Pig, Boris is not going to do that and he's seen to it there are no natural successor. The sh|tshow will (likely) go on until the next election when the knives really start coming out.

Posted by: ft | Jul 6 2022 18:09 utc | 45

A few thoughts from the chattering class

Politics Hub: PM answering questions now as Gove tells him to go - live updates

Today, Boris Johnson insisted that 'of course' he will be still be prime minister tomorrow.

But will the Chris Pincher scandal be the one that prompts the PM to call time on his premiership?

Sky's political team give their thoughts.

'The game is up'

Sky's political editor, Beth Rigby, said she has been told a delegation of three cabinet ministers - Zahawi, Hart and Lewis have made it clear to the chief whip that it's time for the PM to go.

Beth has also been told that this trio say his position now untenable.

Alongside this, she has spoken to a loyal cabinet minister, who told her: "The game is up, this is not survivable.

"I can't see him lasting the day and those suggesting he stays on are not doing him any favours.

"I'm in the trenches with him, but we're outgunned, out-manoeuvred & out of ammunition."

He knows the end is coming but wants to be dragged out

Sam Coates, deputy political editor, has spoken to an ally of the PM.

"Boris Johnson ally says he will fight to the end not because he thinks it will turn things around, but because he wants the optics of being seen to be dragged from office," he understands.

Asked if the end is coming, the PM's ally "appeared to suggest yes: 'of course he does, he's got eyes and ears'".

Posted by: William Bowles | Jul 6 2022 18:17 utc | 46

The PM is appointed by the Queen, who asks the leader of the largest party to form a government. He’s just survived a vote of no confidence which was balloted by his fellow party mps and run by the 1922 committee, if he’d lost that he’d be obliged to resign. The rules state that another one can’t be taken for another year.

Some MPs are attempting to change the rules, but Johnson could use the nuclear option of calling a General Election, at which point the voters and the 1922 committee cease to be MPs and thus no one to vote against him. He remains PM during the general election and could deselect many from running as MPs as he’s also head of the Tory party. He will then use the press and media to win the election, he is their creature.

The men in grey suits are trying to persuade him resign but I suspect he’ll use the nuclear option.

Posted by: Avenir | Jul 6 2022 18:33 utc | 47

The short answer is, No.

Johnson is not going anywhere until the 1922 committee, wut put him in T. May's seat July 2019, takes him out. If I were at all interested in the '22 haggling, I'd be shuffling usual tory suspects by Biggest Loser for his replacement and handicap Big Mouth Truss.

Posted by: sln2002 | Jul 6 2022 18:40 utc | 48

Boris's cabinet ministers are resigning in a bid to distance themselves from the coming chaos. The idea that the 1922 committee makes tweaks to their party's constitution is moot. Unseating a Prime Minister is incredibly rare and highly unlikely to happen particularly with uncontrollable inflation and coming deep recession. All politicians are responsible for allowing this chaos, NONE have any credibility. And so will go the rest of Europe and their masters of the universe. They will have to print to infinity.

Posted by: ft | Jul 6 2022 18:42 utc | 49

IMO, The Queen has had enough of Bojo; he's just too much of an embarrassment to remain in his post and has already served his purpose.

Posted by: karlof1 | Jul 6 2022 16:50 utc | 28

A bigger embarrassment than her sons? The royals have no direct influence any more and far less indirect influence than they had a few decades ago. The UK is completing its slide into geopolitical irrelevance, as did previous dominant nations, Portugal, Spain, Netherlands. Money laundering and spying for the 5-eyes are all that remains.

Posted by: Opport Knocks | Jul 6 2022 18:43 utc | 50

He will gone very soon - maybe even tonight.

Strong rumour that President Zelensky has offered him the job of New Governor of Donetsk Oblast!

That should speed things up on the Eastern Front in a Westward direction!

Posted by: Don Fireneach | Jul 6 2022 18:48 utc | 51

Posted by: DaVinci | Jul 6 2022 15:49 utc | 2

That was pretty much the same description of George W. Bush (Shrub) foisted on the American people in 1999/2000 (also the last time I voted for Democrat for President - I now vote Green if at all). Having been from Texas and familiar with Bush the bumbling liar failing upwards his entire career, I knew better. I don't know if the Brit political system has an equivalent to Vice President, but w/ Dick Cheney on that ticket for the GOP and Joseph AIPAC Lieberman as Gore's running mate, the choice was grim either way.

Posted by: Tom_Q_Collins | Jul 6 2022 18:49 utc | 52

From Craig Murray's entry linked by b: https://boris-johnson-lies.com/

Not following British politics, I was perhaps naively surprised to see dramatic parallels between the lies told by B(l)o(w)Jo and those of the US political system, both "sides" but most prominently by Clintonite Democrats. Namely, numerous examples of Russophobe BS, painting any opposition as tools of Putin/The Kremlin, and fake, empty populist rhetoric (which is mainly Republicans stateside).

Posted by: Tom_Q_Collins | Jul 6 2022 18:54 utc | 53

@James Cook | Jul 6 2022 17:43 utc | 42

Looking at the spreading chaos that the "west" has created it is possible that the "west" may create an "incident" that ALL the current western leaders will use in unison to take authoritarian control of their respective countries.
That was two years ago.

Posted by: Norwegian | Jul 6 2022 18:58 utc | 54

@51 Smart move by Zelensky. One look at Boris in his jogging shorts and the Russian army will collapse with laughter.

Posted by: dh | Jul 6 2022 19:00 utc | 55

Scotch Bingeington | Jul 6 2022 17:33 utc | 40

Carrie Symonds is Bojo's wife, who spent an enormous amount on redecorating Number Ten Downing Street when they arrived. It is a bit of an "in" joke, as she is said to be the "power" behind the office. According to some, she is the one running the place.

Posted by: Stonebird | Jul 6 2022 19:03 utc | 56

b links Craig Murray in his article:
Brexit was just a convulsion, as the United Kingdom went through the psychological trauma of accepting its change in status from great power to reasonably senior European state.

During the Leave campaign, I knocked on doors and asked thousands of people their thoughts about EU membership.

They saw the EU becoming a centrally controlled 'state' run by appointed commissars who routinely ignore the EU's own elected parliament. They saw Brussels desire to subsume the armed forces of the member states into a centrally controlled EU army. They saw our traditional common law being over-ruled by the ECJ, composed of a judiciary which didn't know or understand British justice.

After he dismantled the Soviet system, Gorbachev expressed amazement that Brussels was trying to re-create it in Europe.

The Brits who voted to leave didn't think Britain was going to return to the days of Empire. They were hoping we'd be able to fish our own fishing grounds, become more competitive with exports by cutting EU red tape, curb illegal immigration to our small island, and be able to do our own trade deals.

And avoid getting dragged into wars caused by EU expansionist policy.

Boris Johnson has failed to deliver. EU supertrawlers still take most of our fish, we are still alaigned with most EU rules, and illegal immigration has increased, while ECHR rules prevent us from deporting the criminal element amongst them. It's a Brexit In Name Only. To distract from this failure, Johnson has bigged himself up as the great wartime leader. He's fooling no-one.

Posted by: Gt Stroller | Jul 6 2022 19:44 utc | 57

Stonebird @14

Starmer was head of the UK Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) which played a big part in setting up Assange for extradition to the US, with email chains relating to the case destroyed by the CPS.

https://consortiumnews.com/2022/02/09/boris-bashing-the-assange-factor/

Posted by: Arfur Mo | Jul 6 2022 19:44 utc | 58

U.S. military power used in wars across the globe with little or no legality nor in accordance with the U.N. Charter or International Law. Pretty much covers my life's story of too many lies and deceit by warmongers.

CGTN documentary …

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=5&v=Jkb1f5eqUpM&feature=emb_logo

How many crimes can one cover … the support of Saddam Hussein by CIA and Pentagon in the Iraq-Iran war led to immeasurable pain, hardship and deaths on the battlefield … chemical warfare with precursors from NATO countries. Re: Frans Van Anraat and others.

See also a new challenge for BoJo ..

China: MI5 and FBI heads warn of ‘immense’ threat | BBC News |

Posted by: Oui | Jul 6 2022 20:06 utc | 59

There's a photo of Bojo at the head of this article telling me he's not all there, that his mind's so befogged it's no wonder his hair betrays him constantly.

But will his departure actually change anything? That I very much doubt as he's just another stick-figure being moved about on the stage by those will the real power. Much like their kin in the USA, UK politicos are merely a facade having no interest in actually governing and just want to collect their bloody stipends and perks.

Posted by: karlof1 | Jul 6 2022 20:22 utc | 60

the craig murray article b linked to and @ too scents | Jul 6 2022 17:25 utc | 36 acknowledged is good... here it is again... i am so disappointed with craig on the topic of russia, but i acknowledge he also does good work..

The Death of the British Imperial State

Posted by: james | Jul 6 2022 20:24 utc | 61

Good post. Thanks b.

Posted by: Forest | Jul 6 2022 20:36 utc | 62

Can we all agree that anyone still calling this fool "Bojo" be dropped kicked on sight?

Posted by: Boris the Blade | Jul 6 2022 20:44 utc | 63

James@61
I`m also bemused by Craig`s attitude to Putin and the RF. What is it with him? Is it just, you can take Craig out of the Foreign office, but you can`t take the F.O. out of Craig? I wish I knew.

Posted by: Palinurus | Jul 6 2022 20:45 utc | 64

Two world wars and the Suez crisis have destroyed Britain's imperial state. Brexit has finished it off

Britain is now the junior partner in the Anglo-American empire. As long as they obey the same people who direct Washington DC's foreign policy, they'll be protected from economic catastrophe by the Federal Reserve continuing to buy UK government and corporate debt... at least until the USD loses world reserve currency status (I thought that was imminent 10+ years ago, but my word! I was wrong).

As for Brexit, it allows the UK to chose policies untethered to the great sinking Titanic that is the EU. I don't understand how b can berate practically every Europeon leader and yet still think staying within the EU is a good idea.

Over the last century, Continental Europeans have charted one disastrous political course after another, from Fascism to outright Bolshevism (both kissing cousins when it comes to results, if not stated intentions). The Brits are best out of their political orbit.

Posted by: Observer | Jul 6 2022 20:47 utc | 65

Written in Farsi, sir Keir, is read as tip of the penis. Perhaps profound for a new leader.

Posted by: Sakineh Bagoom | Jul 6 2022 20:51 utc | 66

@56 ".. she is said to be the "power" behind the office. According to some, she is the one running the place..."

Boris is a fairly typical modern British male. Margaret Thatcher got them under her thumb and they've never recovered.

Posted by: dh | Jul 6 2022 21:38 utc | 67

England and the UK should be used to "less manly" men in prime positions, even king.

https://www.guidelondon.org.uk/blog/british-monarchy/british-monarchs-who-may-have-been-gay/

I think the MP's are leaving because they see the crap in the toilet, and have seen the handle pressed, and watching it all swirling toward the drain. They want out before it drags them in with it.

Posted by: BroncoBilly | Jul 6 2022 21:47 utc | 68

A head of the Russian economic council (I think) said recently that the UK was conducting a hybrid war against Germany. Michael Hudson thinks it is the US ("that has now defeated Germany three times in a century"). For the last several hundred years Britain has always moved to stop any strong power dominating Europe, ergo Brexit to work with the US's agenda of cutting the EU down to size (labelled 'Germany's 'liberal empire' by Wolfgang Streeck), enabling the US to dominate the EU by cutting it off from linking to the rising Asian economy, (which would also sideline the US).
The Russians are unequivocal in pointing to the Anglo-Saxons as their prime enemy. Together The City and Wall Street have had two centuries of an oversized role in global capitalism. To my mind its ultimately their interests that are in the Anglo-Saxon's driving seat.
Boris 'got Brexit done' in a fashion, to put the UK in an adversarial role to Germans interests. As Streeck says, instead of being marginalised the UK is now back in Europe as NATO enforcer, as the US's lieutenant. Even under Teresa May, the UK voiced its desire to have an active role in Europe thru' Europe's 'security & defence'.
Seems to me 'deep state actors' want rid of Boris - his job is done - and they appear determined given the way his ouster is being orchestrated. If, as some think, we are heading to a wider world conflict, they must think they need someone more 'substantial' at the helm: KIER Starmer (or hardliner Tory Tom Tugenjadt) look likely candidates; all the other Tory pretenders seem cut from the same lightweight cloth as Boris. Or like Draghi, could we have an outsider, like the head of MI6? John Helmer pointed out that in recent years the just retired head of MI6 was parachuted into the role of head of the UK civil service, without any of the usual selection processes. But what might wash in Italy probably wouldn't in 'the mother of parliments'!

Posted by: Geoffrey | Jul 6 2022 21:48 utc | 69

Johnson's continuing role doesn't depend on the backbenchers or the conservative party donors. It depends almost entirely on the British intelligence agancies that backed him against Theresa May to get Brexit done.

Johnson is a wholly owed creature of the British extablishment/deep state. Unless they change their minds, he's not going anywhere.

British policy in Europe and on the Ukraine issue hasn't changed in centuries: And that policy is to keep Europe as weak as possible and Europeans fighting each other, thus giving the British far greater say as a swing state that can change the balance of power within Europe.

Consequently, Britains entire Ukraine policy is designed to damage Europe as much as possible.And that means damaging the European economy. Which in turn means wrecking the Germans economy.

Britian is not following the US policy on Ukraine. Britain is utilizing the current Ukraine-Russian crisis to ensure it's standard poicy in Europe is maintained.

Hudson was right in his analysis of Ukraine. But like most Yanks has no idea and seriously underestimates the Brits. It is all about damaging Europe. Because it's crucial for Britain's place in the global power hierarchy, now that it's out of the EU, to wreck the EU as much as possible.

And that means ensuring that Russian energy doesn't make it to the EU.

Those of you who are mystified by "Britain's Russia hate" are simply misreading the situation. Britain rarely allows such emotions to get in the way of policy. When they do it's deliberate. There is no "hate" against the Russians. Johnson's policy is simply the British deep state ensuring as much damage to Europe as possible so that British/EU relations are not as one-sided as they would be. The Russian/Ukeaine crisis is British foreign policy at it's best in turning a sow's ear into a silk purse.

So as long as the British deep state/establishement beleve that Johnson is delivering on keeping Britain's advantage against the Europeans, they'll support him and nothing else will matter. If they change their mind, he's toast.

Note: What's really remarkable is the cretinous dolts that run Europe. They know what Peridious Albion is. And yet. . .

Posted by: KyleKoffler | Jul 6 2022 21:55 utc | 70

I don’t believe the Prime Minister can be removed by anyone other than the Queen. There are about 350 Conservative MPs of whom 120 are Ministers. About 10 are important Cabinet Ministers the rest are mere middle-managers. Here is the threat to Johnson: at the moment about 40 Ministers have resigned, including 2 Cabinet Ministers. If Johnson refuses to step down tonight (Wed 6 Jul), many more Ministers may resign. Johnson has to find replacements for his lost Ministers. Where will he find them? If he can’t find Ministers then he can’t run Her Majesty’s government. The Queen will kick him out and ask the Conservative Party to choose a new Prime Minister who can form a government.

Posted by: Michael Thomas | Jul 6 2022 21:55 utc | 71

Brexit was just a convulsion, as the United Kingdom went through the psychological trauma of accepting

Nope. In fact, it's only bumhurt Remainers who bang on about the empire. The Leave voting majority didn't and don't give a shit about Lord-bloody-Palmerston. They care about normal stuff.

But it's more comforting to think people who disagree with our political opinions must be psychologically unstable, somehow.

I have no idea if Boris will go, but it doesn't really matter. British politics are as fake as European and American politics. His replacement will do more or less exactly the same things. The Brexit referendum was a rare anomaly where they accidentally gave the public a genuine choice, and they've been seething about it ever since.

That's why the entire British establishment has been campaigning to get rid of Boris since 2019 - he opportunistically took the plebs' side, and won. Our betters didn't care when Tony Blair lied us into Iraq and Afghanistan, and they clapped when David Cameron bombed Libya into an ISIS-ridden hellhole. They love the war in Ukraine. But they'll never forgive Boris - or the British public - for Brexit.

Posted by: ZX | Jul 6 2022 21:58 utc | 72

Posted by: KyleKoffler | Jul 6 2022 21:55 utc | 70

Yes. I wish we had more analysis like that. Thank you!

And the same logic/attitude can be applied for the understanding of the Germans. It's not alone "idiotic" or "servile" to the US, as Germany is fighting to uphold its role as a privileged junior partner of the USA, which allowed these Ex-Nazis to develop from a completely destroyed country to the export world champion. There is no German imperialism, no hegemony over Europe and no Germany controlled Euro without the protection of the USA terror machine.

Without a total breakthrough there will be no change in this coordinates of german policies.
Its idiotic, but it is consequent. Psychology always plays a role, but only in the second row.

Posted by: njet | Jul 6 2022 22:16 utc | 73

Posted by: Michael Thomas | Jul 6 2022 21:55 utc | 71

A parliamentary vote of no-confidence would remove Bozo.

Posted by: watcher | Jul 6 2022 22:32 utc | 74

@68 Those theories about gay British monarchs have been around a long time. Thanks for the LGBT update. What is not in doubt is the presence of strong women in British history.....Eleanor of Aquitaine knew how to handle Henry II, Cicely Neville wife of the Duke of York, Margaret Beaufort (mother of Henry VII) Elizabeth 1st (virgin Queen who kept her male courtiers on a short leash somehow), Victoria of course ruler of British Empire. Not sure how all this relates to Boris but I thought I'd share it anyway.

Posted by: dh | Jul 6 2022 22:33 utc | 75

Posted by: KyleKoffler | Jul 6 2022 21:55 utc | 70

Well with the recent news of Bozo's meeting with the KGB leader, perhaps he is really MI6

Posted by: watcher | Jul 6 2022 22:35 utc | 76

Posted by: dh | Jul 6 2022 22:33 utc | 75

I think you are sort of right about the women thing. Britain has always done better with Queens rather than kings (but not kings who are queens ha ha).

It may even be a legacy of the ancient British system of tribal leaders- think Boudicea (I am using the old name). Apparently in ancient times, the throne was inherited via daughters not fathers. Do the rightful King was the son (or one of the sons) of the Queen but if no sons then nephews on the female sine. I think that this was one of the real reason for the inheritance dispute between the REAL MacBeth and Duncan, who being largely of English origin followed the patrilineal system.

You should probably add in Matilda to your list of powerful women.

As to gay kings, I suspect that probably England's favourite hero King Henry V was probably also gay. he married very, very late, and to my knowledge was not linked to any mistresses or bastard children. From what I have read (ok often novels) he was also a bit of a fovourite with Richard II who had a rather creepy fascination with children. He was Henry Vs guardian for some years. Not that it really matters, except that the failure of each of those other more certainly gay kings (William), Richard I and II to produce a healthy heir before they died, led in part to endless wars of succession. (mind you too many heirs is also trouble.

Posted by: watcher | Jul 6 2022 22:49 utc | 77

EU was a suicide pact to begin with.

Posted by: Ian Kummer | Jul 6 2022 15:58 utc | 9

My impression is that EU evolved into a suicide pact in this millennium, i.e. relatively recently. Given proclivities of UK elite, UK will follow all suicidal steps of EU, but using their recent freedom to add some of their own.

Posted by: Piotr Berman | Jul 6 2022 23:10 utc | 78

@karloff #60, those are Sanpaku Eyes, an indication of someone dead inside. Sure thing, that's just one picture, more are needed to confirm it's a permanent state.

And yes, they'll change the maestro but the symphony will remain the same. I mean, till the guillotines are brought back to the public square, inshala!

Posted by: Ricardo Ramirez | Jul 6 2022 23:13 utc | 79

@77 Boadicea must have been quite a girl. I assume you mean Matilda of Flanders. Another tough nut.

Richard II came to the throne very young and his first big job was the Peasant's Revolt. Of course he was getting a lot of advice about that. I'm not sure about his private life though. I'll check.

Posted by: dh | Jul 6 2022 23:26 utc | 80

Geoffrey @69 & KyleKoffler @70--

Thanks for both of your comments of which a synthesis is best, which comports well with the overall geopolitical situation. The historic British position is easy to see and understand and remains successful even if the EU and NATO fracture. IMO, Hudson's take on the situation from the Outlaw US Empire's POV is also correct, although it would like to see NATO/EU stay together for another decade so it can milk the situation for all it's worth. The problem for the US is its unleashed centrifugal forces within the EU it's unable to control, and thus its cow might perish sooner than desired. Now we can enter Russia's POV and assume it well knows British and US aims, which is why it's in no great hurry to solve Ukraine. Russia's main goal is to ensure demilitarization and denazification then allow the remaining Ukrainians to decide their own fate by reuniting with Russia, Poland, Hungary, Romania, or reconstituting Ukraine which would be done under close Russian tutelage. Note that Bojo doesn't figure in anywhere; he's not needed whatsoever. He's now unwanted baggage that wouldn't be missed if it were lost in transit.

Posted by: karlof1 | Jul 6 2022 23:37 utc | 81

But the roots of the relationship go back to the initial Plantation and QE1.
Posted by: karlof1 | Jul 6 2022 17:28 utc | 38

That is an interesting comment Karl, is this to do with the British East India Company?

Posted by: K | Jul 6 2022 23:40 utc | 82

Ricardo Ramirez @79--

Thanks for your reply and the curious link. Yes, Bojo has a serious case!!

Posted by: karlof1 | Jul 6 2022 23:44 utc | 83

@ Observer | Jul 6 2022 20:47 utc | 65 who wrote
"
Britain is now the junior partner in the Anglo-American empire. As long as they obey the same people who direct Washington DC's foreign policy, they'll be protected from economic catastrophe by the Federal Reserve continuing to buy UK government and corporate debt... at least until the USD loses world reserve currency status (I thought that was imminent 10+ years ago, but my word! I was wrong).
"

I am in the same boat as you about thinking that the demise of the USD was/is imminent...sigh

Yes, the US is the current face of the God of Mammon cabal but Boris is out there pushing Ukraine to not give up like empire wants him to push for.

Now that he is twisting slowly in the wind, maybe changing horses is the strategy and they just need time to pull it together.

Who is going to admit defeat for the God of Mammon cult if/when that happens?

Posted by: psychohistorian | Jul 6 2022 23:49 utc | 84

Michael Thomas | Jul 6 2022 21:55 utc | 71
“…I don’t believe the Prime Minister can be removed by anyone other than the Queen.”
There’s what you “believe” and there’s how Westminster parliaments actually work.
We try to work with facts here. Not “beliefs’.

Posted by: Melaleuca | Jul 7 2022 0:09 utc | 85

Posted by: RB | Jul 6 2022 16:55 utc | 29

I promise you: none of the resignations sincerely express moral outrage over No. 10 decadent hosted "working dinners" IN A PANDEMIC. 32 comparatively craven but anonymous MPs are out the silent signal Tory gate to stand for ministerial promotions--in a NEW! cabinet package deal. Sajid (trendy former London mayor) and "I'm not Osborn" Rishi's odds for 1922 Committe pick are even. For one, they're easy for the press to profile in oppo to BoJo altho' neither rocked a boat. Also, neither's an irredeemable ICON like Gove, Cummings, Raab, FM Jeremy "Where did my wife come from?" Hunt, Priti "Iron Lady", or FM Liz "global NATO" Truss; but Rishi is a made man. Guardain floated his candidacy for regular GE (2025) early in the Partygate "investigation". I'm guessing, Bojo will "power through" the Tory bazaar without pulling prorogation again to trigger a 2022 snap election, because Tories wouldn't dare risk majority upset by a popular vote.

Posted by: sln2002 | Jul 7 2022 0:15 utc | 86

K @82--

Thanks for your reply and query. In a way, yes, but most specifically to the plan of Plantation by Richard Hakluyt proposed in the 1580s sometime after The Spanish Armada was defeated by the Protestant Wind. What historians of the early mercantile interests planted in North America reveal is their ties to influential factions within the British government. Most important is Bernard Bailyn's The New England Merchants in the Seventeenth Century and the sources connected to that work which spawned others. The same occurred with other Colonial ventures, the East India Company being but one. An open preview of the book can be read here, while the entire work can be accessed here as an Archive member. A study documenting the post English Civil War Era that provides essential information is John Brewer's Sinews of Power: War, Money and the English State, 1688-1783, a free preview of it is also available here. And investigating Brewer's references is also suggested.

I hope this answers your question.

Posted by: karlof1 | Jul 7 2022 0:22 utc | 87

Posted by: Melaleuca | Jul 7 2022 0:09 utc | 8

One problem is that the constitutional positions are all unwritten and developed as convention. This system works very well until it doesn't.

Theoretically if there was a vote of no confidence in Boris, and he refused to resign, he could stay on if the Queen allows. Such a breach of convention would cause uproar, but it might not matter, IF the Queen was determined enough.

In reality today, there is an aging and frail queen who would be very unlikely to trigger such a constitutional crisis, even if she liked Boris.

His best chance would be to tough it out until he can prorogue parliament or it goes into summer recess. Then he could stay on as PM for a few more months, perhaps hoping for a turnaround in fortunes. A terrible strategy for the UK, but one Boris will probably choose.

Posted by: watcher | Jul 7 2022 0:26 utc | 88

IMO, The Queen has had enough of Bojo

who you evidently confuse with Andrew, stripped of a few honorific titles PLUS pecuniary benes.

HRM is barely conscious and has recently delegated officious Crown duties in parliament to Charles. Starmer came out as LEAVER last week after shanking Corbyn repeatedly over 4 years. So. Maybe y'all better move on to Prince of Wales' "ideological leanings", IF Bojo dissolves parliament.

Posted by: sln2002 | Jul 7 2022 0:29 utc | 89

Brexit... so turning your country over to a group of unelected technocrats in Brussels somehow makes your country stronger? I mean I heard the propaganda about the UK's economic woes being caused by Brexit... then you look at the rest of the EU and wonder what the difference is. They all followed the same path in Ukraine. The Dutch even went further and decided to give up farming to eat Klaus Schwab's bugs apparently.

Posted by: Goldhoarder | Jul 7 2022 0:33 utc | 90

The ostensible reason for Boris Johnson’s current, and probably terminal, difficulties are said to be his nonchalance regarding Colin Pincher’s penchant for predatory gay propositioning, combined with excessive alcohol consumption (interesting fact: there are nineteen (19!) bars within the Houses of Parliament selling subsidised alcohol, so no surprise there!). As ‘gay sex’ is almost de rigueur amongst the sexually-conflicted ruling elite, “MP in gay sex scandal” would hardly raise an eyebrow, let alone warrant a newspaper headline, so I can understand BJ regarding it as a mere bagatelle.

There was, however, another ‘sex scandal’ revealed this week. Apparently Boris was caught in flagrante delicto whilst Foreign Secretary getting a blow job from Clarrie in his office by Gavin Williamson MP. All of this whilst still married, with his then wife undergoing cancer therapy, and him trying to wangle a £100k p.a. job for Clarrie at the Foreign Office! It is interesting that Gavin Williamson got a knighthood for keeping his mouth shut, whilst Clarrie got to be Mrs Prime Minister for keeping hers open!

Maybe BJ’s BJ was the indiscretion too far and just too much for the party to..ahem….swallow.

Posted by: rene sonsmann | Jul 7 2022 0:37 utc | 91

btw, refresh your recall of 2016 BREXT popular vote by "kingdom" of the "Union". I wouldn't want y'all to be surprised by forthcoming NI or Scotland referendum results.

Posted by: sln2002 | Jul 7 2022 0:38 utc | 92

another ‘sex scandal’
Posted by: rene sonsmann | Jul 7 2022 0:37 utc | 91

Those are a dime/dozen, so to speak, in British chronicles. But the number of deaths by "herd immunity" in 24 months, compounded by NHS trust privitization since 2010, is an exponentially greater than 1000. Which is to say, either way, UK's free press is bred to pay lip service to "modern democracy" and "human rights".

Posted by: sln2002 | Jul 7 2022 0:54 utc | 93

@karlof, he's truly a sinister character, I avoid looking at pictures of him to not pollute my soul... Same with Elensky.

Thanks for your reply too and also my most profound apreciation for all your hard work documenting and posting about current and past events!

Posted by: Ricardo Ramirez | Jul 7 2022 1:22 utc | 94

I hope this answers your question.
Posted by: karlof1 | Jul 7 2022 0:22 utc | 87

Thanks and am reading up on Hakluyt. It seems that the British and US empires are quite inextricable, enduring and complicit. With the apparent rise and fall of different factions in the centuries since QE 1

Posted by: K | Jul 7 2022 1:40 utc | 95

Apparently Boris was caught in flagrante delicto whilst Foreign Secretary getting a blow job from Clarrie in his office by Gavin Williamson MP. All of this whilst still married, with his then wife undergoing cancer therapy, and him trying to wangle a £100k p.a. job for Clarrie at the Foreign Office!

Posted by: rene sonsmann | Jul 7 2022 0:37 utc | 91

It took me a while to understand this allegation. I learned "continental English", the simplified vernacular used by Europeans south of the Channel to communicate without words like "whilst". So it happened when wide swaths of southern England was clouded by Novichock haphazardly tossed here and there by the Russian disaster pair of Petrov and Boshirov, with the resulting softening of fragile English minds, including Boris. On one hand, this explains why Boris was so weak minded as to fail locking the door. On the other hand, for allowing this disaster to lay waste to England, the government should be dismissed in toto.

But as English minds turned to mush, it was not possible to do. This kind of explains the situation in the Kingdom in the last several years.

Posted by: Piotr Berman | Jul 7 2022 1:45 utc | 96

Posted by: Avenir | Jul 6 2022 18:33 utc | 47

PM "appointment" is pro-forma.

British East India Company?
Posted by: K | Jul 6 2022 23:40 utc | 82

Joint shareholding company granted by Elizabeth Regina 1601 CE -- just a couple decades before the continental 30-Years War started, British navy and merchant mariners finessed Atlantic piracy and conquered Barbados or detoured to the "Jamestown" swamp. That is before John Hawkins acquired a license from Spanish Bourbons to trade African slaves and Cromwell's defenestration of the Stewarts took off into a full-blown, bloody competition for "resource rich" New World territory, when the the sectarian continentals invented international law in 1648.

Read Armitage, David, "The Cromwellian Protectorate and the Languages of Empire". You will recognize a few colonial family names. For indispensible Hakluyt "planter" advice, read Meyer, Mary W., "Beyond the Seas: Eighteenth-Century Convict Transportation and the Widening Net of Penal Sanctions" against the Old World POWs. No membership required.

Posted by: sln2002 | Jul 7 2022 1:48 utc | 97

Stolen from twitter
At this rate... the No 10 summer intern is probably going to be Home Secretary in a Johnson govt

Posted by: Melaleuca | Jul 7 2022 1:48 utc | 98

The opposition leader Starmer is cut out of the exact same cloth. Outwardly demure but similarly without principles or scruples. Only difference from BoJo is that Starmer owns a comb and uses it each morning on his hair

Posted by: DaVinci | Jul 6 2022 15:49 utc | 2

A perfect description of two very corrupt sociopaths. One controls the launch key for all UK nukes. The other desires the same power.

Posted by: Bad Deal Motors On | Jul 7 2022 1:53 utc | 99

Posted by: K | Jul 7 2022 1:40 utc | 95

Europeans been dragging their sorry-ass religious "plantations" across the globe for 600 years. That's watcha call modus operandi so simple, Pompeo can do it. And y'all lap it up like it's the best neo-millenial challenge since jesus on a stick with wheels.

Posted by: sln2002 | Jul 7 2022 2:03 utc | 100

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