Moon of Alabama Brecht quote
January 15, 2014

As Obama Rejects NSA Changes - Need For A New Internet Arises

The still ongoing revelations about aggressive NSA spying on the world have led to hopes that some restrictions would be introduced to it. But that is not going to happen. All President Obama is going to do about it is holding a nice speech that promises to mostly kick the can over to Congress where any reform is bound to die. The NYT previews that speech under the somewhat misleading headline: Obama to Place Some Restraints on Surveillance:

President Obama will issue new guidelines on Friday to curtail government surveillance, but will not embrace the most far-reaching proposals of his own advisers and will ask Congress to help decide some of the toughest issues, according to people briefed on his thinking.
...
The result seems to be a speech that leaves in place many current programs, but embraces the spirit of reform and keeps the door open to changes later.

Rejecting most of the advice of his own hand selected review committee will reinforce the impression that it is not the president that has upper hand over the security services but that the NSA itself is the one that sets the policies. Even the NSA collection of U.S. phone metadata, which in over a decade has not helped in even one terrorism case, will be kept in its current form.

The latest report on NSA hardware implants in computers and network devices claims that nearly 100,000 pieces of such equipment have been manipulated with NSA hardware devices. A number this high can not have been reached by snitching parcels from delivery services and manipulating those. Many of these implants will have been done at the factory level. U.S. hardware manufacturers will be the first ones to be hurt by this new information. The number also makes clear that this effort has mostly nothing to do with spying on "terrorists" or foreign politicians. There is no way that the throughput of so many devices could somehow be analyzed or even supervised by human beings. These implants are thereby not of defensive nature. Yes, some of them will be used for spying but most of these implents must be for outward aggressive action:

The N.S.A. calls its efforts more an act of “active defense” against foreign cyberattacks than a tool to go on the offensive. But when Chinese attackers place similar software on the computer systems of American companies or government agencies, American officials have protested, often at the presidential level.
...
[T]he program, code-named Quantum, has also been successful in inserting software into Russian military networks and systems used by the Mexican police and drug cartels, trade institutions inside the European Union, and sometime partners against terrorism like Saudi Arabia, India and Pakistan, according to officials and an N.S.A. map that indicates sites of what the agency calls “computer network exploitation.”

The European Union (ex Britain) should wake up and understand the currently U.S. dominated form of the Internet is a weapon against it. The German government's failure in its attempt to arrange for some deeper cooperation and a no-spying agreement with the U.S. showed that the U.S. can not be trusted:

"We are not getting anything," the newspaper quotes a source from within the German foreign intelligence agency. "The Americans have lied to us," said another source.

The NSA efforts to weaken encryption and to abuse software and hardware bugs instead of fixing them is endangering everyone's security, including that of the U.S. itself.

There is need for a new Internet based on open source and publicly reviewed hardware and software. Proprietary systems can not be trusted. The EU (ex-Britain) could launch a program to develop such a network. This would be a decade long public effort comparable to the development of the Ariane rockets and the Airbus industry. Both these projects succeeded despite U.S. efforts to sabotage them. A precondition of such a new program are EU laws for strict privacy and laws that forbid its own security services to preemptively try to manipulate the development of the new network systems. Only with such laws, and severe penalties in place, could such a development create the trust that has been lost in the Internet in its current form.

Posted by b on January 15, 2014 at 12:28 UTC | Permalink

Comments

A new, european secure Internet - what a great idea! It could even be sold on commercial grounds - the activity it would attract would contribute to the economy.

Posted by: maff | Jan 15 2014 12:56 utc | 1

AntiWar.com has a piece today on this. Seems Obama is only proposing minor "reforms" to the NSA that will keep all programs as is. With some toothless changes to the FISA courts.

The US snub to Germany (and the EU, not including traitorious UK) demands action.

America is refusing to enter a bilateral no-spy agreement with Germany and has declined to rule out bugging the calls of German political leaders in the immediate future, according to reports in the German media.
A request for access to what is assumed to be a surveillance centre in the top floor of the US embassy next to Berlin's Brandenburg Gate has also been rejected. The German government has told the Obama administration it would consider such a "nest of spies" a breach of the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations.

"Nest of spies" is the correct term to refer to this spy center in the middle of Berlin. Security would imply that the embassy should be moved. Can't have a US spy center like this, located across the road from the Reichstag building (that whole area is the administrative heart of the German government). When I visited Berlin it always struck me how the US got its own embassy on such a prime location, a relic of the Cold War no doubt.

Maybe it should be moved to East Berlin (I assume there are some old Stasi buildings that could be converted into the US embassy). Or maybe move the embassy to the Red Light District, where they can work alongside all the other whores.

Posted by: Colm O' Toole | Jan 15 2014 13:44 utc | 2

Alexander has a horrible sense of humour. He told Bernie Sanders that he can't determine whether the NSA has spied on Congress critturs or not, without breaking the law, because he's only allowed to search the NSA database if he has reasonable cause to believe hat the people he's running the search on have been in contact with designated foreign terr'ist groups.

Posted by: Rowan Berkeley | Jan 15 2014 13:49 utc | 3

"When I visited Berlin it always struck me how the US got its own embassy on such a prime location, a relic of the Cold War no doubt."

"A relic of the cold war" ??????

Hardly. US military occupation of Germany (and Japan) are FAR from over

Posted by: erichwwk | Jan 15 2014 14:02 utc | 4

I guess the question is one of marketing. Is the trust that has been lost so damaging that it would take Americans over to another platform, another system. And, would making that jump be enough to "stand on home base" as it were, immune from NSA's prying eyes. Unless we're so bothered that we'd stand up, walk in a circle around our chair and sit down again, we won't bother to make the jump. Europeans would more readily adapt, but perhaps they'd try to keep a toe in both waters. Would that compromise their computer, the other network? Can that trust ever be restored? Does it matter. We're pretty lazy and forgetful. Vigilance is not our strong suit

Posted by: scottindallas | Jan 15 2014 14:58 utc | 5

Related.

From huffpo, 14 jan:

"The big news: A federal appeals court on Tuesday struck down the Federal Communications Commission's Open Internet Order. This decision means that companies like AT&T, Comcast and Verizon -- which brought the lawsuit -- are now free to block or slow down any website, application or service they like."

http://tinyurl.com/kyy9wyk

Though whether it will stand seems moot?

Posted by: Noirette | Jan 15 2014 15:10 utc | 6

http://www.myantiwar.org/view/271381.html
The NSA Can’t Tell Bernie Sanders if It’s Spying on Him, Because That Would Violate His Privacy

http://www.myantiwar.org/view/271332.html
US Will Not Enter Bilateral No-Spy Agreement With Germany

Posted by: Mina | Jan 15 2014 15:15 utc | 7

One of the implications of these revelations (CAVEAT:which were of course well known to the enlightened ones whose presence among us we greatly value) is that the protection of what is jokingly called "intellectual property" applies only to members of the public. The US government and its cronies pays no attention to the laws in question.
"If the President does it, it is legal", the cornerstone of fascist rule, is now a principle generally accepted by US Courts.

The internet is the Panopticon.

The process of political degeneration into an overt Police State is over: we are now there. This is a Police State. This is totalitarianism. We are like the occupants of a car accidentally connected to a downed electrical line: if we attempt to move we are dead. So long as we sit tight nothing will happen to us. Perhaps the authorities will rescue us. Perhaps they will not.

In order for "b"'s recommendation to be followed there would have to be a massive political upheaval across Europe, most of whose rulers are just as much bootlicking clients of the Empire as Britain's puppets.

Throwing off a regime which has been systematically established over a period of almost 75 years, a regime which infiltrates the entire culture and dominates ideologically, a hegemonic regime (for such is that of the Empire in Europe), is a very large task to undertake. The starting point would have to be a differentiation of Europe from the United States: establishing, in effect, that they can be regarded as discrete entities.

And setting out merely to establish that much would have to be accomplished within the Panopticon: every move to build a movement, from conversations between individuals to publishing programmes and manifestos, would be carried out under the "all seeing eye" of the imperial enemy. Every contact would have to be presumed to involve the participation of a saboteur or spy.

Any movement to push back against the Imperial system not only cannot exclude British or American participants but will rely greatly on exploiting the key weakness of the imperial system which is its contempt for the metropolitan masses. It is in the light of a realisation that America's most dangerous enemy is its super exploited people that nationalist opposition to imperialism must be viewed: the temptation to blame the American masses for the actions of a ruling class which hates them must be resisted.

Posted by: bevin | Jan 15 2014 15:20 utc | 8

"Nest of spies" is the correct term to refer to this spy center in the middle of Berlin. Security would imply that the embassy should be moved. Can't have a US spy center like this, located across the road from the Reichstag building (that whole area is the administrative heart of the German government). When I visited Berlin it always struck me how the US got its own embassy on such a prime location, a relic of the Cold War no doubt.

All the embassies of WW2 'winners' are located in the same area of Berlin, the Brit, French,US, and Russian embassies are little more than a stones throw from each other.

Like the US embassy, the current Russian embassy is in a big building on Unter Den Linden almost right next to the Brandenburg gate, it is on the very next block from the US and Brit embassies .

So the US, the Russians, The French and the Brits ALL have prime locations for their embassies

Posted by: ahem | Jan 15 2014 15:25 utc | 9

@ 8: "The process of political degeneration into an overt Police State is over: we are now there."

Absolutely. The corporate/government alliance in the US is complete.

http://therealnews.com/t2/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=31&Itemid=74&jumival=10913&updaterx=2013-10-25+12%3A54%3A50

Posted by: ben | Jan 15 2014 15:44 utc | 10

It seems to me (a computer un-savvy individual) that the anti-virus/anti-trojan software we pay to install on our computers is potentially a much bigger security risk than NSA. If the blurb which comes with a-v programmes is anything to go by then installing anti-????? software is an open invitation to let it poke around in every nook and cranny in one's computer. And it communicates with its home base several times a day.

I don't need assurances. I LOVE the idea of two people 'monitoring' my computer (one to monitor & one to keep him awake). I'd be interested in why, and if, someone thinks my suspicions are baseless.

Posted by: Hoarsewhisperer | Jan 15 2014 15:46 utc | 11

"A relic of the cold war" ? Hardly. US military occupation of Germany (and Japan) are FAR from over.

True. I mentioned the cold war because the US occupation of Germany and then the Iron Curtain/Cold War makeup sort of merged into each other over the decades. The Cold War serving as justification to continue the US occupation under the threat of a Soviet invasion. But like NATO, this is a relic of history that hasn't been dismantled yet.

On the positive side I think events in the US are already forcing its withdrawal from Europe. The US will in future need to focus its military presence in Asia-Pacific, while also still bogged down in the Middle East. Keeping a large number of troops, bases, military hospitals in Europe will just be a huge waste of money.

Posted by: Colm O' Toole | Jan 15 2014 16:03 utc | 12

The process of political degeneration into an overt Police State is over: we are now there. bevin at 8. I agree.

Yet .., present technology and the possibility of tracking and recording interactions - voice phone (at least the tel. no. and cost), SMS, internet use, posts, messages, e-mails, not to mention GPS coordinates that are easily available? (plus banking, credit. criminal records, etc.) and more I suppose of which I am not aware, has lead to personal, small circuit, spying and control.

Ordinary citizens in the USA, parents, spouses, partners, employers, colleagues, nosy neighbors, small time decrepit vigilantes, spy on whomever they wish, very easily, and do it all the time, for personal hubris, hate, control, court-cases, using info for power, sex, etc.

Citizens delve into the personal lives of others, easy to capt, and use them for blackmail (e.g. I’ll post our naked porno pix if you don’t meet me tomorrow..I have the evidence of your sexts and divorce will be devastating for you .. We saw you indulging in inappropriate inernet act/speech, you are fired and can’t sue) by installing key loggers, spying on passwords, grabbing mobile phones, downloading whole discs, whatever. Always with the justification, I (we) have to find out the TRUTH, i.e. reveal and bruit about what was hidden, or use it covertly.

Rampant spying, with more effects as these deploy in a close, personal, work / family / etc., circle.

The Gvmt. and the ordinary citizens are doing exactly the same thing.

They mirror each other, and even egg each other on, in the sense of copy-cat and legitimization.

In intent - aims to damage, hurt, mock, push to suicide, demean, control, destroy, imprison, seek revenge on - if not in techno power.

Posted by: Noirette | Jan 15 2014 18:20 utc | 14

@Hoarsewhisperer - most of the anti-virus software is snakeoil

Posted by: b | Jan 15 2014 19:58 utc | 15

@Hoarsewhisperer #11:

Had this exact same thought in the past, but most recently just yesterday. "Just because you're paranoid, that doesn't mean they aren't out to get you!"

@Colm O'Toole #2:

A request for access to what is assumed to be a surveillance centre in the top floor of the US embassy next to Berlin's Brandenburg Gate has also been rejected. The German government has told the Obama administration it would consider such a "nest of spies" a breach of the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations.

"Such a predicament! Unfortunately, your industrial espionage has rendered the German state so broke we can no longer maintain the infrastructure to provide your embassy with electricity. We're awfully sorry...really! Would you like a beer and a brat?"


Posted by: Dr. Wellington Yueh | Jan 15 2014 22:02 utc | 16

Another dystopian aspect of IT is the whole job loss thing. Not only does information technology allow for a more efficient police state, but it has sped the offshoring-of-industry race to the bottom. Just think about all the productivity gains since the dawn of the neoliberal age in the 1970s, a period that coincides with the ascension of IT, and almost none of those gains have gone to labor.

The workerless factory that IT makes possible was supposed to compensate us fully while we pursued self-improvement in our leisure time. That was the marketing pitch. Instead what we got was a marginal existence of low-wage work with no promise of a better future other than superior connectivity for our smart phones.

Who could have conjured up such a hell realm?

Posted by: Mike Maloney | Jan 15 2014 22:11 utc | 17

The idea of a new internet is foolish. We are very lucky to have an internet as free as it is. Any newer internet would be controlled by the powers. Remember the French minitel, which was a controlled internet, I know many who spent fortunes for their interest, which they later had free on today's internet.

Never ask for a new internet. It would be controlled, paid for, and inspected by the NSA.

Posted by: Alexno | Jan 15 2014 23:30 utc | 18

Regarding Ben's MSG #13

Now that this hardware hacking exploit has been revealed, couldn't it be completely nullified by well designed Faraday Cages with or without Optical Isolation (since there has to be a data path out of the "cage").

The real lesson of these revelations is to build countermeasures against hacking into the system at every level from the ground up.

Posted by: rackstraw | Jan 16 2014 0:40 utc | 19

    The workerless factory that IT makes possible was supposed to compensate us fully while we pursued self-improvement in our leisure tisurveilenceme. That was the marketing pitch. Instead what we got was a marginal existence of low-wage work with no promise of a better future other than superior connectivity for our smart phones surveilence/tracking devices

    Who could have conjured up such a hell realm?

    Posted by: Mike Maloney | Jan 15, 2014 5:11:20 PM |

Emmanuel Goldstein did.

He wrote a book about it apparently


<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Theory_and_Practice_of_Oligarchical_Collectivism#Chapter_I

Posted by: lmao | Jan 16 2014 1:02 utc | 20

The TCP over IP protocol is the basis for reliable communication over unreliable networks.

What is needed now is a protocol that allows secure communications over insecure networks.

It doesn't have to be made in the EU, although the i2p protocol is a good start. The tahoe-lafs is a good start for a secure cloud.

Of course all the software must be freely available, open to inspection and verification. Firmware, to the extent it's required in an open system, too.

A government's 'help' in developing such protocols is the kiss of death. The Internet is the DARPAnet.

Fixing what's broke is a political problem and can only be effectively solved bottom-up, whether in its technological, telecommunicative, or its governmental manifestation.

Posted by: john francis lee | Jan 16 2014 1:54 utc | 21

"embraces the spirit of reform and keeps the door open to changes later."

Yep... that's pretty much boilerplate for any "conversation" between the corporate-state and it's citizen/consumers at this point.

...

Through b's first link, I found this: CONGRESS CRACKS DOWN ON PURCHASES OF CHINESE-MADE IT

The US companies must have lobbied hard for this one, all that hardware would just rot on the docks otherwise. It strikes me that this movement towards technological autarky not only makes the a new internet probable, but may even make the "old" internet impossible.

Posted by: guest77 | Jan 16 2014 3:05 utc | 22

The key word is preemptive. The data is there for when the right time comes.
Much of this discussion is on RealNews interview with Chris Hedges and NSA whistleblower William Binney.

The whole American Way of Doing Business has gone mental, bananas, psycho if you will. They're shooting their foot big time. The new Scorcese film, The Wolf of Wall Street, depicts the mental type pretty wall, well, I mean.

Posted by: citizen x | Jan 16 2014 4:06 utc | 23

It would be against the very principle of the internet - to link everybody.

One man's spy is another person's whistleblower.

The issue is not the internet, the internet is fine. The issue is applications that should be secure linked to the internet. If a firm or a private person or a country does not know that by internet they open themselves to everybody - sorry. If they do not have the imagination that they have to pay for security - sorry.

If your country's infrastructure is run via internet you might as well save the costs for an army.

Posted by: somebody | Jan 16 2014 6:34 utc | 24

This may seem appropo of nothing, ...but it's really not. Listen to this:
'I was the Kid with the Drum' http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eih67rlGNhU

Ya' know? 10,000,000s out of work, who gives a RRCH about NSA & Net Neutrality?
Pardon me, polemicists are just rearranging bone piles on the Kolyma Highway.

'They' know the economic tides, through our links. 'They' know the ebb and flow
of our last life savings into Wall Street and IRS. 'They' skim and clip and tax.
'They' pump and dump, and watch and wait. At some point, 'They' collapse it all.
It's called Stop Loss. We are the Loss. Useless Mouths.

http://thegospelcoalition.org/blogs/kevindeyoung/2012/10/16/seven-cautions-for-eager-polemicists/

Posted by: Chip Nikh | Jan 16 2014 8:55 utc | 25

so now they've proven huawei is *unsafe*...coz its hacked by nsa !
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/01/16/huawei_security_concerns_strong_financials/

Posted by: denk | Jan 16 2014 9:42 utc | 26

Of course all the software must be freely available, open to inspection and verification. Firmware, to the extent it's required in an open system, too.A government's 'help' in developing such protocols is the kiss of death. The Internet is the DARPAnet.

Jacob Appelbaum, TOR evangelist and another hero of the Greenwald fanbois, gets paid by US Military, amongst many other dodgy payers

Posted by: stfu | Jan 16 2014 11:42 utc | 27

It's time for another discussion on a 98% yes to a referendum
http://english.ahram.org.eg/NewsContent/1/64/91686/Egypt/Politics-/Table--of-votes-in--governorates-in-favour-of-draf.aspx

Posted by: Mina | Jan 16 2014 12:07 utc | 28

As Kerry/Lavrov/Brahimi were meeting at the US embassy in Paris (no Fabius probably busy drawing a battle plan for Hollande)
http://www.liberation.fr/monde/2014/01/13/syrie-entretien-cle-a-paris-entre-john-kerry-et-serguei-lavrov_972364
The next day, no more Brahimi, who had pain last year to fix the confidence he should keep with the Syrian gov
http://rt.com/news/syria-meeting-friends-conflict-484/

the moderate rebels were meeting in....... Cordoba! under the guidance of pro-djihad psychic Yaqoubi, whose hosts in Morrocco (i.e. with green light and paper from KSA) accepted to let travel to.
http://uk.reuters.com/article/2014/01/09/uk-syria-crisis-opposition-idUKBREA080PA20140109
Everybody was there (but it's too laughable to be reported in the MSM), i.e. FSA, Liwa al Islam etc... Spain was well inspired, according to Reuters "Rebels from the Western-backed Free Syrian Army were also at the meeting in Cordoba, a venue chosen by the Spanish government because of its historical importance as the capital of the Islamic caliphate during the 10th and 11th centuries AD."

The spiritual figure has a solution, which he has had in a vision, namely, he saw that KSA was going to send fighter jets. Here is the programme: "We sit here to discuss, but the real makers of the revolution are the ones who are carrying guns and standing behind canons in the land of jihad in Syria. ... Syria is an Islamic state, whether you like it or not, whether you want it or not." (https://www.facebook.com/shaykhabulhuda/posts/10152219393437580)
The same guy has called his fighters to go Geneva, unlike Jarba, Manna etc (trick to let the djihadists be dealt with by the P5?)
https://twitter.com/Shaykhabulhuda/status/423479476027006977

Someone (should get rehab') dared wondering "About Saudi intervention, I remember Sh. Yaqoubi predicting over a year ago aerial intervention by a friendly power(s) very soon. It hasn’t happened, however, could it still happen but against ISIS?" (http://www.joshualandis.com/blog/new-isis-leaks-reveal-particulars-of-al-qaida-strategy/?cp=2#comment-420214)


Posted by: Mina | Jan 16 2014 12:27 utc | 29

It's time for another discussion on a 98% yes to a referendum

And according to the Guardian, based on a 38% turnout.

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jan/16/egyptian-voters-back-new-constitution

Posted by: Alexno | Jan 16 2014 12:34 utc | 30

stfu, anybody who calls for open source code for operating systems must be right, at least in that respect. Open source means a million nerds can go through it and spot the trojans & backdoors and whatnot as fast as they get planted in it. You can probably do that just with checksums, or hash numbers, or whatever.

Posted by: Rowan Berkeley | Jan 16 2014 15:08 utc | 32

RT just had a big show centered around Jacob Applebaum's appearance at THE 30C3 conference and his work against NSA spying. They put him in the spotlight - I guess they didn't get the right wing memo from foff/stfu that Applebaum "get's paid by the US military".

And its funny, the ONLY people I can find online with big criticisms of Applebaum (one example) is this: Applebaum is a traitor to the US. That he, via the TOR project, has received (a relatively tiny amount) of "US tax payer money" but he is also so aggressively involved in attacking the US government by supporting Snowden's whistle blowing (possibly knowing of it before hand, and helping him carry it off), all while being deeply involved with Public Enemy #1 Wikileaks. These accusations usually end up with accusations that he is in the pay not of the "US Military" but of the scary scary Kremlin gremlin and President Putin. The only "serious" complaints that I can find - and by serious I mean able to do more than drool out a one line meaningless factoid onto this fine blog - is that Applebaum and TOR isn't loyal enoughto the US military.

So we have to ask, why does sockpuppet stfu/foff, unable to make even one negative comment about wromfood Ariel Sharon upon his demise, make endless posts attacking Greenwald and Applebaum making them out to fronts for the US government (a government that he only criticizes, generally, in this context)? Is it because he is the type that takes hold on radical internet blogs, like a tick with a keyboard, to do nothing more than parrot the line of the NSA? A pro-US crypto-fascist scumbag whose loyalties really lie with the US hypersecurity state - evidenced by the fact that he can't ever say a bad word about a real fascist (often coming to their defense, past and present), but seems to get all bent out of shape when a someone wants to remind you that you're being spied on?

Posted by: guest77 | Jan 16 2014 15:53 utc | 33

Rowan I'll rejig the format slightly for ya

    Of course all the software must be freely available, open to inspection and verification. Firmware, to the extent it's required in an open system, too.A government's 'help' in developing such protocols is the kiss of death. The Internet is the DARPAnet.

    Jacob Appelbaum, TOR evangelist and another hero of the Greenwald fanbois, gets paid by US Military, amongst many other dodgy payers

    Posted by: stfu | Jan 16, 2014 6:42:06 AM | 27


==========

RT just had a big show centered around Jacob Applebaum's appearance at THE 30C3 conference and his work against NSA spying. They put him in the spotlight - I guess they didn't get the right wing memo from foff/stfu that Applebaum "get's paid by the US military".

he saw it on TV - it simply must be true


The only "serious" complaints that I can find - good for you

unable to make even one negative comment about wromfood Ariel Sharon upon his demise,

What has sharon got to do with anything ?

as moronic whining goes that really beats all competition, has to be the stupidest thing anyone's ever been criticised for, evar, not surprising given the source

Posted by: stfu | Jan 16 2014 16:08 utc | 34

Right wing - ohh booga booga

Left right left right eins zwei eins zwei - good little puppy

Posted by: stfu | Jan 16 2014 16:09 utc | 35

I listened to sections of Appelbaums Hamburg chaos club speech - sounded like what some PR guy would cook up for an Umbrella group representing US Computer/Internet Corporations (Apple/Google/Facepuke etc)

Essentially it's :- US Corps with massive control over your devices and your data = a good thing - it's just that nasty NSA that stops them being paragons of data-privacy virtue.

He listed several corps and whined about how it's not their fault really, they're good people, doing good things,

Really they are poor little victims of the NASTY faceless boogey men at the NSA.

Posted by: stfu | Jan 16 2014 16:19 utc | 37

denk #36: running back through the links from that article, I arrived at this from Jan 8 by Bruce Schneier. Check out the comments, they're very absorbing:
https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2014/01/halluxwater_nsa.html

Posted by: Rowan Berkeley | Jan 16 2014 16:58 utc | 38

@stfu is banned for trolling while adding no value

Posted by: b | Jan 16 2014 17:53 utc | 39

Interesting insights about the percepted balance of power between Germany and USA/GB(in German)

This is an interview with Andrew Denison from Transatlantic Networks(a us PR-guy in Germany)
http://ondemand-mp3.dradio.de/file/dradio/2014/01/15/dlf_20140115_1219_fb7e0a50.mp3

Q:What if Germany quits all agreements with US like SWIFT and flight-data and so on and invites Snowden to Germany and gives him an medal of honor....?
A:LoL,I mean,I woud not do that.I,would..clear the balance of Power.Who depends on who? what is the framework of this partnership.U.S. has an interest in a strong germany in a save environment,and the world is very dangerous without emrika on your side.
Q:so we should shut the Fuck up?
A:nee..,ye..,No!We have to clear who is contributing what to global order and freedom and how much influence you get about strategy and tactic for that.

This is an interview with the Germany correspondent of the British "Independent"
http://ondemand-mp3.dradio.de/file/dradio/2014/01/16/dlf_20140116_1222_adac9df9.mp3

Q:why does GB not concider even a No-Spy-Agreemant in the EU?
A:Thats a long (hi)story...I mean in GB a spy is james bond.In germany there was gestapo and stasi..And in Germany there was no big incidence like in london.

Posted by: Some1 | Jan 16 2014 20:57 utc | 40

A good piece here on the state of relations between Germany and the US.

Relations between Germany and the United States are worse now than during the US-led invasion of Iraq a decade ago, a leading ally of Chancellor Angela Merkel said today, in a sign of mounting anger in Berlin over American spying tactics.

Philipp Missfelder, foreign policy spokesman for Dr Merkel’s Christian Democrats (CDU) in parliament, said Berlin should bar US access to a database of international financial transactions unless Washington promises to stop spying in Germany.

“2003 is generally seen as a lowpoint in German-American relations,” Mr Missfelder said, referring to the clash over former US president George W. Bush’s invasion of Iraq. “But if you look at the current situation the loss of trust is not smaller than it was then. Indeed it’s probably bigger because this issue is preoccupying people longer and more intensively than the invasion of Iraq.”

The proposed barring of American access to the SWIFT international payments system, has already passed the European Parliament. Germany should certainly impose this condition.

Of course on this issue there is one problem, a similar problem that emerged during the Eurozone crisis. Germany should be calling for a European-wide No Spy Deal with the US, instead of just looking for its own national deal. Germany has the influence to stand up to the US in a way that smaller countries like Belgium or Ireland don't. If Germany were to lead a Europe wide rejection, most other member states would support it and follow them. This would both 1) Give Germany a stronger hand in the negotiations 2) Ensure protection is Europe-wide.

Posted by: Colm O' Toole | Jan 16 2014 22:01 utc | 41

The US acts toward Germany like they use to act toward a friend:
You can say and do whatever you think is right to do or say,as long as you do not harm any of our interests.Otherwtise you should consider who is prptecting the export routes of your "mercantilisic" economy inside and outside of europe f.e in the Pacific or Persian Golf.
Its like: impresive export rates,nice social system and good robust economy.It would be so awful seeing it be crumbling.

Posted by: Some1 | Jan 16 2014 22:28 utc | 42

"Germany should be calling for a European-wide No Spy Deal with the US.."
-It is possible to reach that with the cost of some concessions to other members,but no absolut result because you can not verify what SECRET-agencies do.
"..instead of just looking for its own national deal."
-Going for a national deal was the only way for Germany to have a share in the doings of the 5 I´s.

"Germany has the influence to stand up to the US in a way that smaller countries like Belgium or Ireland don't."
-Yes!

"If Germany were to lead a Europe wide rejection, most other member states would support it and follow them."
-Yes,but they would just pretend to follow.I doubt that any country with influence in Europe would like Germany or the others to lead anything.

Posted by: Some1 | Jan 16 2014 22:51 utc | 43

@ Some1

Yes,but they would just pretend to follow.I doubt that any country with influence in Europe would like Germany or the others to lead anything.

I've got news for you, Germany has been leading Europe for at least the past 5 years. Who else is there? France is an economic basketcase living off former glories, Britain spends its time looking for ways to run away from Europe, if Britain had their way, they would move the island off the coast of New York City. German is the last major power in Europe remaining. As Poland's foreign minister said he is "more afraid of German inactivity than German leadership".

The EU is a political entity and every political grouping needs leadership otherwise there will be a power vacuum. The Financial Crisis and now this NSA crisis shows the EU needs leadership, and there is only one country that is strong enough to provide it. No one in Europe wants the NSA listening to telephone calls and emails. Instead of Germany just securing its own deal, it should rally other member states and finally show some leadership.

Is this a European Union or a European Disunity, were everyone fights for themselves?

Posted by: Colm O' Toole | Jan 17 2014 0:12 utc | 44

test

Posted by: denk | Jan 17 2014 6:35 utc | 45

Rowan Berkeley 38

tks but those r mostly geek speak :-(

what i do know is there's an intensive campaign to discredit huawei,
already uk is having second thought about huewei eqpt .

Posted by: denk | Jan 17 2014 6:40 utc | 46

test

Posted by: bevin | Jan 17 2014 14:03 utc | 47

Looking for Control baby!

QUOTE
"If you read my blog, you’ll know that I predicted Jacob’s next move would be to protect corporate intelligence assets at the expense of full-time NSA spooks. That’s exactly what happened at 30C3, ad nauseam.

Why does this matter? Because the really important part of Snowden’s revelations was that private corporate entities are working with the NSA/GCHQ to spy on you. Appelbaum’s strategy is to paint these mega-tech companies, the corporate sponsors who can afford tickets to his talks, as the victims of stupid/malicious government. Give ‘em another chance, Joe Voter, so that we can salvage these invaluable, once-in-an-empire, intelligence assets. Watch the video. Appelbaum repeats the meme “It’s not the companies fault’ at least five times. I’m going to let him talk with a few quotes:

“This is part of a constant theme of [NSA] sabotaging and undermining American companies and American ingenuity. As an American, though generally not a nationalist, I find this disgusting, especially as someone who writes free software and would like my tax dollars to be spent on improving these things and when they do know about them [the vulnerabilities in Windows] I don’t want them to keep it a secret because all of us are vulnerable. It’s a really scary thing.”

And, in case you forgot who the bad guys are…
“Emperor Alexander, the head of the NSA, has a lot of power. If they want to right now, they’ll know that the IMEI of this phone [holds up his iPhone] is interesting, it’s very warm, which is another, uh, funny thing, and they would be able to break into this phone almost certainly and then turn on the microphone. And all without the court. So that to me is really scary. And I especially dislike the fact that if you were to be building these types of things, they treat you as an opponent if you wish to be able to fulfill the promises that you make to your customers. And as someone who writes security software, I think that’s bullshit.”

And tough-love, Tor-style…
“Now we’re going to name a bunch of companies, because fuck those guys for collaborating when they do. And fuck them for leaving us vulnerable when they do. And I mean that in the most loving way, because some of them are victims, actually. It’s important to note that we don’t yet understand which is which. So it’s important to name them so that they have to go on record, so that they can say where they are, and so that they can give us enough rope to hang themselves. I really want that to happen, because I think it’s important to find out who collaborated and who didn’t collaborate. In order to have truth and reconciliation, we need to have a little truth.”

Jacob refuses to believe Apple is evil…
“Do you think Apple helped them [the NSA] with that [iPhone targets]? I don’t know…. I don’t really believe that Apple didn’t help them with that.”

“Either they [the NSA] have a huge collection of exploits that work against Apple products, meaning that they are hoarding information about critical systems that American companies produce and sabotaging them, or Apple sabotaged it themselves. Not sure which one it is. I’d like to believe that since Apple didn’t join the PRISM program until after Steve Jobs died, that maybe it’s just that they write shitty software. We know that’s true.”

Stop attacking Microsoft, NSA!
“How many people from Al Qeada use Solaris, do you suppose? This tells you a really important point. They [the NSA] are interested in compromising the infrastructure of systems, not just individual people, they want to take control and literally colonize those systems with these implants. And that’s not part of the discussion. People are not talking about that because they don’t know about that yet, but they should, because, in addition to the fact that Sun is a US company, which they are building capabilities against, that to me, it really bothers me, I can’t tell you how much that bothers me. We also see that they are attacking Microsoft and other US companies, and Linux and Free USB (?) where there are a lot of people from all over the world who are building it, so they’re attacking not only collective efforts and corporate efforts, but basically every option you possibly can, from end-users down to telecom core things, um…”

Finally…
“I want to really harp on this. Now it’s not that I think European companies are worth less, I suspect especially after this talk that won’t be true, in the literal stock sense, but I don’t know. I think it’s really important to understand that they are sabotaging American companies because of the the so called ‘home field advantage’.

The problem is that as an American who writes software, who wants to build hardware devices, this really chills my expression and it also gives me a problem which is that people say: ‘Why would I use what you’re doing? What about the NSA?’ Man that really bothers me! I don’t deserve the Huawei taint. And the NSA gives it.

President Obama’s own advisory board, that was convened to understand the scope of these things has even agreed with me about this point. That this should not be taking place. That hording of zero-day exploits cannot happen simply without thought processes that are reasonable and rational and that have an social and economic valuing where we really think about the broad scale impact.”

So, yeah, Jacob’s on a mission to save that special relationship between Silicon Valley and the US intelligence community."

UNQUOTE

Posted by: LMAO | Jan 17 2014 14:07 utc | 48

So, LMAO @47, what is your point?
Does it matter that Appelbaum is soft on capitalism and imperialism? It is not as if he makes any attempt to deceive us: he is quite open about his world view.
God forbid that I should associate you with the stfu troll, but he makes very similar points @37. And they add nothing, apart from smearing Appelbaum, to the discussion.

Posted by: bevin | Jan 17 2014 14:42 utc | 49

Emptywheel has a good post concerning David Albright's pernicious influence on the Senate Iran Bill.

Posted by: bevin | Jan 17 2014 14:44 utc | 50

Good news for people who like bad news about companies in bed with the NSA. Via Zero Hedge:

"Only A Dozen Customers Showed Up To Buy iPhones" - Apple's China Expansion Already A Flop?

[...] Instead of the round-the-block lines that have greeted Apple product introductions in China and other countries in the past, only about a dozen customers showed up to buy iPhones at the opening of a store in Beijing — despite the presence of a special guest, the Apple chief executive, Timothy D. Cook." [...]

Eat that Cook you sell out.

Love it. Thanx Ed!

Posted by: Juan Moment | Jan 18 2014 2:14 utc | 51

The comments to this entry are closed.