Moon of Alabama Brecht quote
June 10, 2007

Kagan's Selective Data

Annals of selective data:

Neocon "surge" architect Fred Kagan writes an OpEd in the LA Times about Al-Anbar province in western Iraq: Al Qaeda's new enemy -- Iraqis

Violence in the provincial capital has dropped precipitately, from 108 deaths a week in mid-February to seven in the second week of May.

We are now in the second week of June.  Doesn't Kagan have more current numbers than the second week of May? Or is he using selective data to support his argument?

Lets google a bit:

WaPo, May 25

At least 34 people were killed and 66 wounded when a car packed with explosives plowed into a funeral procession for Allawi al-Issawi, assassinated a day earlier, who was a member of the Albu Issa tribe. He had been active in promoting the Anbar Salvation Council, as the tribal alliance is known, friends said.

IraqSlogger, May 29

Just days after the announcement of a tribal coalition to combat militant groups in Salah al-Din province, several relatives of the council’s newly chosen leader were killed by gunmen in what appears to have been a targeted attack.

Four relatives of the head of the Salah el-Din Salvation Council, Sheikh Hamad al-Hasan, were killed when unidentified gunmen attacked their house in al-Hajjaj village, in southern Bayji, Voices of Iraq (VOI) reported Tuesday.

LA Times, June 1

Efforts to improve security in Al Anbar province, long the primary stronghold of the Sunni Arab insurgency, suffered a setback Thursday when suicide bombers detonated explosives at a police recruitment center in Fallouja and a police station in Ramadi. At least 20 people were killed and 31 injured, police and witnesses said.
...
The suicide attacks in Al Anbar were the latest in a steady series against the followers of tribal sheiks who have spurned Al Qaeda in Iraq insurgents and are cooperating with the government. Last week, a Fallouja tribal leader was slain and his funeral procession the next day was bombed, killing 30 mourners.

NYT, June 6, 2007

In recent months, the [Diyala] province is thought to have become the main operating base for the insurgent group Al Qaeda in Mesopotamia and its Sunni Islamic allies. Until recently, they were principally based in Anbar, the Sunni-dominated province directly west of the capital.

ABC News, June 8

At least 19 people have been killed in bomb attacks on Iraqi security forces, nine of them in the suicide truck bombing of a police station near the Syrian border in the north-west of the country.

"The bomber blew himself up at the entrance to the building after police opened fire on him," Brigadier General Mohammed al-Waga told AFP.

He said five police officers were among the dead in the attack in Rabiaa, which also left 22 people wounded, 15 of them police.

At least two civilians were killed in another apparently botched attack on police in the capital of the restive western province of Al-Anbar, police said.

Posted by b on June 10, 2007 at 10:22 UTC | Permalink

Comments

I think the Op-Ed page editor just picked the piece out of a pile and ran it without bothering to update it. Not a bad way to proceed, given the piece's delusional disconnect with reality.

Posted by: alabama | Jun 10 2007 11:20 utc | 1

from the above:

In the midst of the doubt and fear that grips the United States about Iraq today, however, it's critically important to recognize the positive trends. even if we have to make it up Iraq's Sunni Arabs, once one of the most supportive communities of Al Qaeda, are now among the most hostile, repudiating their alliance of convenience with the terrorists and risking their lives to fight with us against our worst enemies. except that, some of the Sunni resistance has formally realligned their common cause with AQ This is a trend worth fighting to continue, and Iraqis who now stand with us at their own peril are people worth fighting for. and of course, its the "Iraqi's that stand with us" and our "interests" that are the only Iraqi's worth fighting for


Posted by: anna missed | Jun 10 2007 20:06 utc | 2

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