Moon of Alabama Brecht quote
March 13, 2006

Target Iran

Bush today:

Some of the most powerful IEDs we're seeing in Iraq today includes components that came from Iran. Our Director of National Intelligence, John Negroponte, told the Congress, "Tehran has been responsible for at least some of the increasing lethality of anti-coalition attacks by providing Shia militia with the capability to build improvised explosive devises" in Iraq. Coalition forces have seized IEDs and components that were clearly produced in Iran. Such actions -- along with Iran's support for terrorism and its pursuit of nuclear weapons -- are increasingly isolating Iran, and America will continue to rally the world to confront these threats.

IEDs used in Iraq are usually from old military equipment: artillery shells, tank mines and general explosives. Some time ago the Brits made some hassle about shaped charge IEDs supposed to have been made in Iran and this is what Bush is referring to.

But shaped charge technology is more than 100 years old. Such charges have been used since WWI and in any conflict since. Any civil or military demolition professional knows how to make these without much documentation. Others will have to surf the web.

For some more refined version, Amazon has some books to sell, that do explain how to do it. Fundamentals of Shaped Charges and Evaluation of Improvised Shaped Charges are good starters. Some US Army research lab reports, like A Shaped Charge with Dual Confinement can also be purchased online.

To make the explosives yourself, start here. But compared to the chemicals, the tools one needs to make the actual "shape" from copper or other metals are even less sophisticated. As these pictures of such devices show, these things are made in a car repair shops rather than in Iranian ammunition factories.

This issue it is just another talking point of the rising propaganda campaign to justify war on Iran. Unfortunately, we will hear much more of these in coming weeks.

How long until the bombs drop?

Posted by b on March 13, 2006 at 21:37 UTC | Permalink

Comments

Since Israel will do the heavy lifting, under cover of our AWACS umbrella and Tomahawk missiles and Spectre gunships, they will select the timing.

This month. March.

Cheney/Rove cannot wait much longer.

They so-o-o-o need another cakewalk.

Posted by: Antifa | Mar 13 2006 23:19 utc | 1

This time, if it happens, the blowback on the U. S. is going to get pretty heavy. Yes, gas prices go up, the economy goes down into a tailspin. Is this going to set up the conditions to rally support for George, the 50 year old boy king? Raise your right hand all together now.

I can't believe that anybody believes what George has to say. Are we Americans stupid or what?

Posted by: christofay | Mar 13 2006 23:56 utc | 2

What Paddy Chayefsky's Howard Beale said 30 years ago: "It's all Bullshit"

What ever happened to full retaliatory response? Can't some body simply say to Iran,,,,drop one nuke on anyone and you will be wiped off the map!!! It worked well in the past with a much bigger bogeyman. A warning that should apply to any Nation in the Middle East.

As far as supplying Iraq with a few firecrackers, even if it's true, what the F difference does it make to the mightiest military in history. Get the F out of Iraq and it won't be a problem .

Posted by: pb | Mar 14 2006 0:01 utc | 3

Was driving around today doing chores
before leaving town, and realized in a
sort of mind-fart eureka-esqeue moment,
one stop after another just laced more
bureaucrat bullshit on the other, and a,
'you have to do this before you do that'
kind of frog-march mentality, looking
at everyone walking by, only the goths
and the boarders seemed 'in the moment',
and I have my doubt about those goths.

We are become a sleepwalking society,
going down the rubber stamp road to long
lines of shuffling animatronic humps.

Sorry, just don't have the words to convey
what it's like to have grown up out in the
country, back in the hills, and now here
we all are, plugged into our cellphones and
yelling to invisible specters as we pass
by each other, like ghosts on the Titanic.

"I have come, sir, to reclaim my humanity," he said, hardly able to pronounce the words he was uttering. His voice whistled with a high-pitched squeak, which made him the more unintelligible to the man behind the desk. "It hasn't been entirely my fault, the years have changed me."

The official, who was wearing a black coat and striped pants, focused his beady, myopic eyes on the applicant through a pair of very thick glasses -- the lenses looked like the bottoms from two perfectly round-cut medicine bottles.

"It is a most extraordinary request, Herr...Herr..." the official stammered while fumbling through a mountain of papers on the desk to find his application papers. "I can't find them, but I am duty bound to report this to my superiors."

"But, that's exactly what you said yesterday," the applicant objected. "You must allow me in before I change my mind. In my condition, timing is essential!"

"You didn't leave your application with me yesterday," the official complained nervously and obviously agitated by the applicant's audacity. "Your request is extraordinary, very extraordinary. Most people want to get out, not to get in, and that makes you a suspect in these terrible times."

"All I want is to be what I used to be earlier in my life. Is that an unreasonable request?"

Franz Kafka - Metamorphosis

Which is by way of saying, sorry, but no one
will pay the slightest attention to the latest
battle of EurAsia, especially if NeoZionistas
attack Iran on the last night of American Idle.

We might as well be living in Dafur, for all
that anyone gives a golly-gosh darn, whoo-eee.

http://www.iranian.com/

Remember, Iranians are exactly like you and me.

Posted by: PingPing | Mar 14 2006 3:06 utc | 4

Check that. America's a poor imitation of Iran.

http://www.iranian.com/Travelers/2006/March/Shiraz/19.html
http://www.iranian.com/Travelers/2006/March/Shiraz/13.html
http://www.iranian.com/Travelers/2006/March/Shiraz/26.html

All this will be lost, like tears in the rain.
Bombed, looted, rubblelized, dust-bounced,
pick your own verb-noun visualization tool.

Posted by: PingPing | Mar 14 2006 3:19 utc | 5

Here's a quick reality check.
And don't peek at the answer!

Is the woman in the picture
an American, or an Iranian?
http://tinyurl.com/rx79d

And is that an American weapon
of mass destruction or an Iranian?
http://tinyurl.com/qtzuh

Posted by: PingPing | Mar 14 2006 3:29 utc | 6

You will love this one:

Iranian pact with Venezuela stokes fears of uranium sales

A recent deal between Iran and Venezuela provides for the exploitation of Venezuela's strategic minerals, prompting opposition figures to warn that President Hugo Chavez's government could be planning to provide Tehran with uranium for its nuclear program.
...
Public details are vague, but Venezuelan opposition figures and press reports have said the deal on minerals could involve the production and transfer to Iran have said the deal on minerals could involve the production and transfer to Iran of Venezuelan uranium taken from known deposits located in the dense jungle states of Amazonas and Bolivar.
Of course the little fact of Iran having its own Uranium mines with plenty of that stuff is missing in the piece.

But again, this idiocity will be reported and rereported hundred of times.

Posted by: b | Mar 14 2006 6:42 utc | 7

U.S. Push for Democracy Could Backfire Inside Iran

Prominent activists inside Iran say President Bush's plan to spend tens of millions of dollars to promote democracy here is the kind of help they don't need, warning that mere announcement of the U.S. program endangers human rights advocates by tainting them as American agents.
...
"We are under pressure here both from hard-liners in the judiciary and that stupid George Bush," human rights activist Emad Baghi said as he waited anxiously for his wife and daughter to emerge from interrogation last week. "When he says he wants to promote democracy in Iran, he gives money to these outside groups and we're in here suffering."

Posted by: b | Mar 14 2006 7:28 utc | 8

And what if the only real lesson from Iraq is that the US can totally fuck up and there are no serious consequences?

The US nukes Iran and what? Some short-lived demonstrations? A few hundred 'tough but balanced' columns in serious media outlets?

Last call, drink up!

Posted by: biklett | Mar 14 2006 8:43 utc | 9

Ping's http://www.iranian.com/Travelers/2006/March/Shiraz/19.html>LINK to a remarksble tea house interior, wonderful example of Islamic architecture.

Posted by: anna missed | Mar 14 2006 9:04 utc | 10

Come on, brownish people couldn't find out how to make shaped charges. Someone must have taught them!!!

Posted by: Greco | Mar 14 2006 9:16 utc | 11

Good point about the shape charge IED's (b). On nightline tonight, the announcer equated Bushes 2 billion dollar plan to combat IED's to the Manhattan Project -- which sent my mouthful of beer into a lethal projectile across the room.

Posted by: anna missed | Mar 14 2006 9:40 utc | 12

I thought the US would attack Iran in June 2005, but maybe I was a year premature. How about June 2006, or is it too hot by then?

In any case, the fact that UK Foreign Secretary Jack Straw has said US military action against Iran is "inconceivable" means that it's now a dead cert.

In his latest speech, Mr Straw also bypassed his ironymeter by saying that the Iranian people deserve a better government than the one they recently chose to elect.

Don’t we all, Jack, don’t we all.

Posted by: Dismal Science | Mar 14 2006 12:20 utc | 13

@ Dismal Science: June 2006? Too hot? How about the 6th? [06/06/06] Or is that just too too...?

Posted by: beq | Mar 14 2006 12:48 utc | 14

We invaded Iraq and now Iran is attacking us there. That was one of the reasons given for the invaseion "Let's fight 'em there so we don't have to fight 'em here!".

I guess the logical consequence is that the more of them we are fighting over there, the less we will have to fight them here.

Posted by: ralphieboy | Mar 14 2006 13:05 utc | 15

EDs used in Iraq are usually from old military equipment: artillery shells, tank mines and general explosives. Some time ago the Brits made some hassle about shaped charge IEDs supposed to have been made in Iran and that this is what Bush is referring to.

Yeah, funny how the Brits aren't making a hassle about that how. Maybe it's because they found out from where where the designs actually originated.

Posted by: Old Fart | Mar 14 2006 14:18 utc | 16

I mean: funny how the Brits aren't making a hassle about that now.

Posted by: Old Fart!! | Mar 14 2006 14:19 utc | 17

A dot to connect?

Israeli forces raid Jericho jail sparking shootout; two dead

Israeli forces driving bulldozers and firing tank shells burst into a Palestinian prison Tuesday and removed dozens of inmates in a raid targeting prisoners convicted of killing an Israeli Cabinet minister.

Posted by: beq | Mar 14 2006 14:35 utc | 18

HOPE NIALL FERGUSON IS WRONG

Posted by: Groucho | Mar 15 2006 3:12 utc | 19

For the record. The Chief of Staff agrees with me and says Bush lied:

Top U.S. Military Official: No Evidence of Iran Involvement in Iraq

Marine Corps Gen. Peter Pace, chairman of the Joints Chiefs of Staff, said today he has no evidence the Iranian government has been sending military equipment and personnel into neighboring Iraq.

On Monday, President Bush suggested Iran was involved in making roadside bombs, known as improvised explosive devices, that are being used in Iraq. And Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld last week accused Iran of sending members of its Revolutionary Guard to conduct operations in Iraq.

Today, Pace, the top U.S. military official, was asked at a Pentagon news conference if he has proof that Iran's government is sponsoring these activities.

"I do not, sir," Pace said.

Posted by: b | Mar 15 2006 7:25 utc | 20

On DKos: Chief of Staff General Pace: "Bush lied"!

Please recommend.

Posted by: b | Mar 15 2006 7:59 utc | 21

edward herman: Uncle Chutzpah and His Willing Executioners on the Dire Iran Threat: With Twelve Principles of War Propaganda in Ongoing Service


Twelve Principles of Propaganda Used in Setting the Stage for War: the Iran Case

The first principle in manufacturing propaganda for the U.S. war party is to take it as a given that the United States has the legal and moral right to take the lead in making a case that the international community must act-here to stop Iran's nuclear program.

...

The second principle, paralleling the U.S. right to do as it pleases, is the absence of the target's right even to defend itself.

...

A third principle is inflating the menace that would follow from Iran's possession of nuclear weapons.

...

...the fourth principle applied in the media's beating the drums of war is unrelenting demonization of the target.

...

A fifth principle is to avoid discussion of any current relationships with governments that might deserve demon status as much or even more than the target (here Iran).

...

A sixth and closely related principle is the need to keep under the rug any awkward past actions or relationships with the target that might show both hypocrisy and the fraudulence of the claimed threat.

...

A seventh principle is keeping under that (rapidly bulging) rug any current actions of the United States that might appear incompatible with its harsh stand opposing Iran's pursuing any nuclear program.

...

An eighth principle is that the United States not only has a right to ignore the NPT as it applies to itself, it can also alter the terms of the NPT as it applies to its target.

...

A ninth principle is that if the target cannot prove a negative, the severity of the threat to U.S. "national security" requires that Iran be bombed and that there be a change in regime to one that can be trusted (like that of the Shah of Iran, or Sharon, or Musharraf).

...

A tenth principle is to use the mechanisms of international regulation linked to the UN to serve the war and goal of regime change: by pushing for ever more intensive inspections and ultimatums; by denigrating the adequacy of inspections; by taking any absence of proof of the negative and any target country foot-dragging on cooperation with increasingly intrusive inspections to demonstrate its nefarious character and virtual proof of its secret operations; and by getting the UN and Security Council to make concessions appeasing the aggressor that give his aggression an aura of semi-legality.

...

An eleventh principle is to pretend that all the frenzy and activity of the Great Powers to deal with the Iran threat is based on a universal worry, and does not reflect U.S. power and the attempts to appease that power.

...

A twelfth principle is to disregard any hidden agenda the U.S. may have in going after Iran.

Posted by: b real | Mar 15 2006 15:29 utc | 22

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