Moon of Alabama Brecht quote
October 13, 2004

Debate Preparations

Are you in need of a serious depression?
Has your urge to kick some ass slacked?
Is your outrage temperature below boiling?

Just read some news:

Seymour Hersh narrated in Berkley last Friday. Here is the webcast (RealPlayer).

And as he told the story, another platoon from his company came and executed all the guards, as his people were screaming, stop. And he said they just shot them one by one. He went nuts, and his soldiers went nuts. And he's hysterical. He's totally hysterical. And he went to the captain. He was a lieutenant, he went to the company captain. And the company captain said, "No, you don't understand. That's a kill. We got thirty-six insurgents."

Consigliere James Baker is travelling the world to reduce Iraqs debt, while his company, the Carlyle Group, works for Kuweit to maximize their share in debt collection from Iraq.

"Baker is on two sides of this transaction: he is supposed to be representing the interests of the US, but he is also a senior counsellor at Carlyle, and Carlyle wants to get paid to help Kuwait recover its debts from Iraq."

Charles County May Change School Reading Lists. WaPo adds:

Board [of education] members would also invite Gideons International to provide Bibles to students, and cull school reading lists to ban books offering "a neutral or positive view of immorality or foul language."

As it happens, one of the board members, Collins A. Bailey, is a member of Gideons International. A second, Mark Crawford, is host of a weekly religious radio show whose producer favors the abolition of public schools and opposes women holding elected offices that exert authority over men.

The basis of optimism is sheer terror. - Oscar Wilde

Posted by b on October 13, 2004 at 08:29 AM | Permalink

Comments

CIA holding Al-Qaida suspects in secret Jordanian lockup

The Central Intelligence Agency runs a top-secret interrogation facility in Jordan, where at least 11 detainees who are considered Al-Qaida's most senior cadre are being held, Haaretz has learned from international intelligence sources.
...
Their detention outside the U.S. enables CIA interrogators to apply interrogation methods that are banned by U.S. law, and to do so in a country where cooperation with the Americans is particularly close, thereby reducing the danger of leaks.
See also Human Rights Watch Briefing Paper

Posted by: b | Oct 13, 2004 8:48:57 AM | 1

The bipartisan, Congress mandated US Comission on Civil Rights finds nothing new (PDF)

This report finds that President Bush has neither exhibited leadership on pressing civil rights issues, nor taken actions that matched his words.

Posted by: b | Oct 13, 2004 9:10:42 AM | 2

George W. Bush tells New Yorker writer Ken Auletta: "No President has ever done more for human rights than I have.".

Posted by: MarcinGomulka | Oct 13, 2004 9:30:54 AM | 3

A report on these prisoners issued Tuesday by the Human Rights Watch organization claims they are being held somewhere so secret that U.S. President George Bush asked the CIA heads not to report it to him.

???

Guilty conscience?

Fear of being kidnapped and interrogated by al-Qaida?

Tourette's Syndrome?

Posted by: Harrow | Oct 13, 2004 12:15:27 PM | 4

And justice is being demanded by those who are losing their fear.

See this article by a former interrogator in the AG prison in Iraq. He repeatedly reported abuses and repeatedly his superiors did not pass on the complaints. Systemic?

Posted by: Citizen | Oct 13, 2004 12:44:05 PM | 5

Off Topic for Jerome and Bernhard:

Gulf states have been producing about 16.5 million barrels per day, almost at full capacity.

Trillions or billions (always confuses me) but that is annual revenue of $325,215,000,000.00

WTF is this money going?

On topic for this thread:

The moderator in tonight's last debate is the one and only Bob Schieffer:

"Others wonder how tough he'll be on Bush, who named his brother Tom ambassador to Australia. I raised the subject with Schieffer last year, and he said he had struck up a friendship in the '90s when W. and Tom were running the Texas Rangers. Bob and the future president went to ballgames together and played golf."

Looks like the fix is on.

Posted by: Cloned Poster | Oct 13, 2004 1:02:57 PM | 6

@CP

thanks for that, guess nobody will need the wire tonight.

lets hope kerry can turn the boat right at them, upset the table, send the chips a flying, go down swinging if its down hes a goin -- he owes at least this much to US.

Posted by: anna missed | Oct 13, 2004 1:37:19 PM | 7

Anna, "watch this drive"

Posted by: Cloned Poster | Oct 13, 2004 2:17:44 PM | 8

My despair of the moment? Jacques Derrida died on Saturday, and on the very next day the New York Times pissed on his ashes in a slanderous front-page obituary (calling to mind their front-page book revue of Bill Clinton's autobiography). No other paper in the world did anything like this--not even the WSJ or the Washington Times. So whatever else I'm feeling these days, the worst is the shock and shame of having been a faithful and patient NYTimes reader and subscriber for over fifty years.

Posted by: alabama | Oct 13, 2004 3:23:44 PM | 9

Good news, Secretary Snow just made an idiot statement about job losses being a "myth," and the wheels seem to be falling off the Republican campaign in Ohio as a result. Kerry is already on top of it and ready to speak to this tonight.

It reflects the degree to which the White House tries to spin its way out of the problems facing working America when it should be focusing on solutions. President Bush will have to answer directly tonight for this outrageous slap in the face to America's middle class. He'll also have to answer for the worst jobs record since Herbert Hoover."

Posted by: Citizen | Oct 13, 2004 3:37:32 PM | 10

OPEC production ceiling allocations (tb/d)

Nov  1, 2004

Algeria 862
Indonesia 1,399
IR Iran 3,964
Iraq
Kuwait 2,167
Libyan AJ 1,446
Nigeria 2,224
Qatar 700
Saudi Arabia 8,775
UAE 2,356
Venezuela 3,107
OPEC production ceiling (excl. Iraq) 27,000

Actual production for all of OPEC is around 28mbd, i.e. 1.4 billion $ per day, or close to 500 billion $ per year at that price.

That money, of course, is in New York (it's dollars). It is partly spent (mostly on European goods, think Mercedes or Louis Vuitton), partly used to repay debt (so back to whoever had lent to these governments), partly invested offshore, nowadays a lot more in Europe or Asia than in the US (because of 9/11 and its after effects), so it goes to buy European stocks and bonds and thus funds European investment. A little bit is invested more locally (see Dubai).

(/OT) Meanwhile, the US consumes 20 million barrels per day. Any chance that oil consumption will be discussed in tonight's debate???

Posted by: Jérôme | Oct 13, 2004 3:43:20 PM | 11

alabama

there is an eloge pour derrida posted here through anna missed or rapt from asian journal

concise & honourable

still steel

Posted by: remembereringgiap | Oct 13, 2004 3:46:20 PM | 12

Pepe Escobar (of Asia Times Online) on Derrida - Decontructing the War on Terror

Posted by: b rea

Posted by: remembereringgiap | Oct 13, 2004 3:50:21 PM | 13

as citizen mentions above, things are getting icky in Ohio

"Thieves shattered a side window overnight at Lucas County Democratic headquarters in Toledo, ... (read more at The Blade linked above).

Posted by: esme | Oct 13, 2004 4:10:50 PM | 14

that Derrida link Deconstructing the war on terror

Posted by: b real | Oct 13, 2004 4:15:52 PM | 15

From b's Haaretz exerpt at the top of the thread:

"[The Al Qaeda members'] detention outside the U.S. enables CIA interrogators to apply interrogation methods that are banned by U.S. law, and to do so in a country where cooperation with the Americans is particularly close, thereby reducing the danger of leaks."

A few points: First, all CIA detention facilities (and there are many) are located outside the U.S... because, you know, that's were the CIA actually operates. Second, Jordan is an ally of the U.S. in the WoT, and within the borders of U.S. allies one finds (surprise!) U.S. detention facilities. Third, the location of a detention facility has no bearing upon the laws applying to agents, other facility staff, or the persons under confinement there. Those laws are the same whether the facility is in Jordan, Indonesia, Yemen, Italy, or... Canada. Lastly, as for the existence and location of the facility in Jordan or any other such facility being "top secret" and unknown to the general public: I sure as hell hope so.

If Human Rights Watch, which loves unsourced material, is going to go after the CIA, it might as well do so for something concrete, like the Agency's insufferable arrogance and substitution of me-focus for mission-focus. That'd be a good read.

Posted by: Pat | Oct 13, 2004 8:02:46 PM | 16

@Pat

Get a Grip!

When Little Caesar or Little Custer(Rummy or GW Bush ) lead the Army and the Corps into a shit-swamp of GW's own making, I think it is high time for everyone to get focused: on the insane shit that this administration has been dumping on us for four long years.

If the Army and the Corps really love all this so much, I'm sure as you say , they will vote Republican.

You go on along and vote Republican now. Good for the Army and the Corps. Good for the country too.

Posted by: FlashHarry | Oct 13, 2004 8:43:36 PM | 17


My little droll look at "debate" #4 sez; Kerry same centered, coherent, and steady -- too understated if anything. Bush on the other hand continues to exhibit yet another facit of his MULTIPLE PERSONALITY SYNDROME. Gone this time are Mr HunchbackofNotre- Dame, also gone is Mr Nicknicknick Loudalker, so now comes
Mr Empathetic Softy. There were a couple of momentary lapses into the other personalities and at least one lapse into the (not fully developed) Mr Sotiredofworking -- but essentially he stayed with the "compassion" meme this time around.

I'm sorry but this guy is so affected, so discombobulatedly affected, that its hard to believe anybody could walk away from this with any CONFIDENCE that Bush could tie his shoes, let alone cope with the leadership of the free world -- not to mention BELIEVING all this horseshit about his "steady leadership" , his "moral core", his "comfort in his own skin" all of course which are totaly belied by his own
performance.

The issues of course are another matter.

Posted by: anna missed | Oct 13, 2004 11:48:23 PM | 18

anna: As I suggested on the open thread here, I think what happened tonight is that the White House shrinks finally got Dubya's "meds" relatively well adjusted. But not perfectly, obviously, since Junior was compulsively guffawing and smirking throughout the ninety minutes -- when he wasn't putting on his "pious" routine -- somewhat like a lobotomy recipient. ;-)

A better performance in general by Bush, I suppose, but a mere "performance" nonetheless -- all hat and no herd, that one, mentally and otherwise. Once again, Kerry seemed a distinctively rational alternative to this incumbent Clown-in-Chief.

F--- Dubya, we're taking *him* out! ;-)

Posted by: JMFeeney (USA) | Oct 14, 2004 12:18:09 AM | 19

anna: As I suggested on the open thread here, I think what happened tonight is that the White House shrinks finally got Dubya's "meds" relatively well adjusted. But not perfectly, obviously, since Junior was compulsively guffawing and smirking throughout the ninety minutes -- when he wasn't putting on his "pious" routine -- somewhat like a lobotomy recipient. ;-)

A better performance in general by Bush, I suppose, but a mere "performance" nonetheless -- all hat and no herd, that one, mentally and otherwise. Once again, Kerry seemed a distinctively rational alternative to this incumbent Clown-in-Chief.

F--- Dubya, we're taking *him* out! ;-)

Posted by: JMFeeney (USA) | Oct 14, 2004 12:18:09 AM | 20

@FlashHarry

I take it you were responding to my post of yesterday rather than to the one above at 8:02, which doesn't reference Bush or the administration.

What's good for the country, Harry? A guy whose position on Iraq, the single most important issue of this election, is incoherent? A guy who says that the way to tell if a war is right or wrong, a mistake or not, is by the outcome? Is that what's good for the country?


Posted by: Pat | Oct 14, 2004 12:31:39 AM | 21

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