Moon of Alabama Brecht quote
August 12, 2017

Shireen Al-Adeimi - Has The War In Yemen Become A Spectator Sport?

Shireen Al-Adeimi (@shireen818) was born in Aden, south Yemen. She is currently a doctoral candidate at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. The text below was copied from Shireen Al-Adeimi's Twitter thread published on August 11 2017.


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Has the war in Yemen become a spectator sport?

My thread may be long, but I hope you’ll take a few minutes to read it.

The war on Yemen rages, yet, Yemenis' plight is STILL not receiving the attention it deserves - not from the media, nor from politicians. When Yemen's not totally ignored, facts are obscured because confronting our countries' active participation in destroying Yemen is inconvenient. While rich Arab states bombard Yemen with fancy (Western-purchased) weapons and hire mercenaries as ground troops, many are afraid to confront the Saudis and face financial consequences (e.g. the UN) or are themselves implicated and/or profiteering (e.g. the U.S./UK). So United Nations offers "concerns” and UK expresses its desire to "find a political solution" while they fill their pockets at the expense of Yemeni lives. And while citizens are often oblivious to their governments' crimes, many know about #Yemen but are not doing enough with this knowledge.

Has Yemen become a spectator sport? For two and a half years, Yemeni children’s dead or emaciated bodies have been splattered all across our screens. Some shed tears, others donate, few hold politicians accountable, but most just turn away. Is it helplessness or indifference? I can't tell. Yemenis are not knocking on Europe’s door because we are trapped by a land/air/sea blockade. Are we 'out of sight out of mind'? I can’t tell. Someone once told me Yemeni children are not ‘photogenic’ enough to draw emphatic responses. Is racism/discrimination at play? I can’t tell. Or are Yemeni wallets not heavy enough to purchase or at least demand international attention, condemnation, and action? I also can’t tell.

What I can tell is that the world is watching. They watch our kids die of curable diseases like cholera because they have no access clean water. They watch our children die of hunger in a time of immense global wealth because their parents can not afford what little food is available. They watch as our children, women and men are killed by U.S.-supported, Saudi airstrikes that target homes, schools, and hospitals alike. When people are asked to engage with elected officials (even by simply signing a petition like: Save Yemen) only a few engage. Even when we ask for our stories to be shared with wider audiences, we're ignored (I was told that readership on Yemen news is in the tens).

I and other Yemenis not only have our families in mind, but millions who ca not access the most basic of needs: safety, shelter, food, and water. I feel totally and utterly helpless. I struggle with sharing stories of dying Yemeni children when I know that no one will come to their rescue. I cry, from the depths of my soul, for a nation that suffers in silence all the while exemplifying the true meaning of faith and resistance. I mourn the children whose little bodies gave up fighting in the time it took you to read this thread. And I pray for Yemen.

---

Earlier Moon of Alabama coverage of Yemen:

Posted by b on August 12, 2017 at 12:13 PM | Permalink

Comments

her words are heartfelt and disturbing or worse for what they say.. so much of this seems to boil down to money is more important then people, especially people in faraway places we don't personally know.. unlike the author who does know people, we collectively find excuses to not to anything.. it is sickening..

Posted by: james | Aug 12, 2017 12:43:53 PM | 1

The ongoing Yemen genocide(?) is just another conflict that western MSM refuse to cover, why? Because western governments are involved in the killing. Just another psyops propangada approach we all know western msm so well use when it comes to wars. Instead Russia is getting bashed 24/7 along with other hated nations the same ignorant MSM makes up along with their government.

Wished we could do anything on Yemen politically, but even the pathetic left dont even raise the issue!

Posted by: Anoynmous | Aug 12, 2017 12:48:58 PM | 2

you live and study in a country thats facilitating this horor
and could end this tragedy quickly if they really wanted
why burden me ?
i can do less than you , not living there

Posted by: auke | Aug 12, 2017 1:42:10 PM | 3

Confrontation fears .. Financial consequence fears... from UN? Profiteering from U.S. U. K. are there US or UK embassies in Yemen? I found links w\represent my knowledge about Yemen
https://apnews.com/4925f7f0fa654853bd6f2f57174179fe talks about torture chambers
https://www.hrw.org/news/2017/06/22/yemen-uae-backs-abusive-local-forces torture?
https://theintercept.com/2017/08/09/gulf-government-gave-secret-20-million-gift-to-d-c-think-tank/
(apparent players: youself Al Otaniba, Atlantic Council, Pavel, OP, MEB, CNAS, MEI, ECSSR)
but these links seem a little one sided..?
what language is spoken in Yemen? Are there any English speaking news sites?

Posted by: fudmier |

Posted by: fudmier | Aug 12, 2017 2:09:10 PM | 4

Modern wars are fought by ad agencies and marketing firms. "Not photographic enough" simply means Yemen is not yet using good-enough professional marketing firms and/or social media campaigns to get the word out.

This can be done for surprisingly cheap. Yemen is at an advantage in it does not need to fake things, like the White Helmets. Simply take short (15 sec-2 min) videos of atrocities/outcomes, describe how you feel about them (in English if possible, Arabic if not), and upload them weekly to a Youtube channel. Get all civilians who have cell phones to do the same. See movie "Witness". Keep it up for 6-36 months. Wars get stopped because people tell their stories, not because of facts and statistics.

Posted by: Imagine | Aug 12, 2017 2:18:46 PM | 5

Contrast the plight of Yemeni children with that of Omran Daqneesh, he of "dusty kid in an ambulance in Aleppo" fame.

He didn't even have serious injuries but because his image was broadcast by major outlets around the globe as front page news, all at the same time, it had a big effect. In addition to this were countless supporting articles and opinion pieces.

How many children are there in Yemen suffering in far worse ways? Thousands and thousands yet you don't get such a concerted media campaign for any of them.

At best someone like Krishnan Guru Murphy films a piece in Yemen showing real suffering, but it is relegated to the foreign affairs section of C4 news, and is discussed in a couple of articles in left leaning papers.

This kind of differing treatment exemplifies the way in which opinion is manipulated through propaganda.

Posted by: Bob | Aug 12, 2017 2:38:18 PM | 6

Anoy@2

"pathetic left" in my opinion is a wholly inadequate description. Despicable, cowardly, morally, spiritually and intellectually co-opted and totally corrupted, barely comes close enough to describing a "Politically Correct", Identity Politics" phenomena, ushered in with the black "Hope and Change", "Noble Peace Prize" president Obama and his partner in war crimes Hillary Clinton, who usurped the minds and hearts of a generation that's been incapacitated of the ability to think critically and act righteously for peace on behalf of the victims of imperialism and all humanity. Hence the "Alt Right" gaining so much traction in the absence of any real "left" analyses and opposition to oppression. Thank God we have a few islands of light and sanity left, such as 'Moon of Alabama' and 'The Saker' sites wherein the facts and the actual truth can be disseminated and principled alternatives be openly and honestly exchanged among those left with any capacity to think critically for themselves. As such I think that the old "left right" dichotomy is practically inoperable as terms of references anymore. And that perhaps new terms have to be invented that reflect social, moral and political consciousness. Whatever the case, that the voices of sanity and common sense prevail over mass deception and lies is imperative at this critical juncture in history, if humanity is to survive and avoid nuclear annihilation by those that currently hold almost total control and power over us all. My eternal gratitude to the tirelessness work of "b" @ this fine site.

Posted by: RayB | Aug 12, 2017 3:35:20 PM | 7

Yemen and Haiti before it, exemplify the utterly despicable immorality of the West and its associates. And there were others prior to them in Africa, Asia and Latin America going back to the genocide waged on Koreans by the Outlaw US Empire, with probably close to 100 millions dead, yet only the One Holocaust is "celebrated."

I lay responsibility at the feet of the Outlaw US Empire because of its longstanding quest to dominate the planet and squeeze wealth from every pore it can to satisfy the Corporadoes that control it--For a Few Dollars More.

Posted by: karlof1 | Aug 12, 2017 5:01:25 PM | 8

Auke @ 3: At the very least, you could share and spread Shireen al Adeimi's message to your friends and acquaintances if you have email or have Facebook or some other social media account. You could still sign the Change.org petition linked to the article.

Al Adeimi may be living and working in the US but that does not necessarily mean she's eligible to vote yet and be able to influence the political process there. You may be thanking your "lucky stars" you don't live in the US but you could still be living in a country that's an ally of the US and like the US is sending weapons, ammunition and military equipment to Saudi Arabia to use against Yemen.

Posted by: Jen | Aug 12, 2017 5:02:16 PM | 9

b,

Thanks for posting the plights of the Yemenis and very much appreciate it.

Posted by: OJS | Aug 12, 2017 5:03:25 PM | 10

When sifting through her Tweets (I must admit I find Twitter easily manipulable, reducing true activism to arm chair warriorism and a waster of time that could be put to much more effective use) I sense some naiveté. Like the tweets attributed to democrats. The Democrats are one and the same with the Republicans. They're the same product with a different brand directed at another audience.

Like "Why do we continue to sell billions of arms to Saudi Arabia and give a pass to a monarchy that perpetuates the devastating war in Yemen?" https://twitter.com/SenSanders/status/875455813095227392
The answer to that question is of course that the ruling class (Bernie included) are a group of greedy liars and hypocrits. As if the support and sale would have ever taken another turn under his presidency. The war on Yemen started under Obama as did many other wars and under previous presidencies be it Democrat or Republican.

Or "Your calls are working! @SenSchumer now opposing the Saudi arms sale. http://bit.ly/2rTbnPv Call 1-855-686-6927 to talk to your Senators." https://twitter.com/WinWithoutWar/status/874337142805340164
This kind of hypocrisy and deceit almost makes me vomit. That's trying to suck out the air of movements that could make a difference and diverting attention and energy into the corrupted system.

The war on Yemen is a huge horror and crime against humanity. But so is for example the war in eastern Congo perpetuated by the Rwandese Kagame regime, an ardent US ally, that has cost more than 5 million Congolese civilian lives over the last decade. That tragedy has not even garnered half of the media attention Yemen has gotten so far.

https://twitter.com/shireen818/status/887442279916593156
I doubt if the pictogram is complete. The US for example is pictured as a supporting country while it has also bombed the Houthi's after they managed to destroy the HSV-2 Swift catamaran leased by the UEA. The US also regularly bombs other actors in Yemen so it should be categorized as an attacking country. The elephant in the room Israel that has been providing intelligence even before the start of the conflict isn't even mentioned in the chart. I also see countries like Senegal listed as attacking countries but as far as I know they deliver grunts just like Colombia has delivered at least 400 grunts but the country isn't in the list. Can Djibouti be called a sovereign country? I'd call it an internationally owned military colony.

Posted by: xor | Aug 12, 2017 5:40:39 PM | 11

>Has Yemen become a spectator sport?

yes

>For two and a half years, Yemeni children’s dead or emaciated bodies have been splattered all across our screens. Some shed tears, others donate, few hold politicians accountable, but most just turn away. Is it helplessness or indifference? I can't tell.

it is because to confront yemen we must confront our relationship with saudi arabia, and we cannot do that without changing our politics, and we cannot do that without changing our relationship with israel, and we cant change our relationship without benefiting iran, and we cannot benefit iran without empowering them to take revenge on israel, saudi arabia, and the US/EU deep state. nobody fears yemen, but everybody is scared literally shitless of iran (they totally should be). america tried to play a Machiavellian real politik game in the middle east and everyone in asia knew it would fail but kissenger got his way and now everything is fucked up beyond all recognition. zionism is fucked, the lekud is fucked, the saudis are fucked, UAE is fucked, and alqaeda (along with its variations like isis and al nusra) is fucked. unfortunately for yemen, until we take out the saudis many of yemens sons and daughters must die the most dark and miserable deaths imaginable in modern warfare, because the yemenis are on the historically moral side of the battle and the west is backing the most disgusting elements of humanity that one can find in the middle east.

> Yemenis are not knocking on Europe’s door because we are trapped by a land/air/sea blockade. Are we 'out of sight out of mind'? I can’t tell.

yes. houthis dont invade continents to rape women and children under guise of asylum seeking. if you did you would get more attention. right now you are dependent on the media, and the media is run by saudi arabia and israel.

>Someone once told me Yemeni children are not ‘photogenic’ enough to draw emphatic responses. Is racism/discrimination at play? I can’t tell.

no. propaganda is.

>Or are Yemeni wallets not heavy enough to purchase or at least demand international attention, condemnation, and action? I also can’t tell.

yes.

Posted by: anonymous | Aug 12, 2017 5:56:43 PM | 12

Thanks from me too for bringing Yemen's fate to at least some people's attention.

Sadly enough, I'm rather pessimistic that anything will change in the foreseeable future.
The western powers need this war as a means to keep KSA in check: One false move (towards China), and 'Saudi atrocities!' will be on all front pages. That's why Riyadh was lured into this trap, a war it obviously cannot win, but can't afford to lose. (nb, not unlike the instrumental role of the Kurdish conflict)

Should Yemen become an issue of our diplomacy and media, this would mean relations between Riyadh and the west are deteriorating. And I'm not sure this would be good.

Posted by: smuks | Aug 12, 2017 6:15:45 PM | 13

Ah yes, the terrorist empire and their minions continue to sow misery around the globe, simply for increased profits. As for Americans, most here could care less about the less fortunate here, let alone in Yemen. Besides, the NFL season is here, and der fuhrer Trump is tweeting, everything is just wonderful.....NOT!

Posted by: ben | Aug 12, 2017 7:22:18 PM | 14

Sadly I could tell the exact same speech about Congo :(

Posted by: Paul | Aug 12, 2017 7:46:11 PM | 15

The root of the Yemen problem, and similar problems being endured in many other countries inhabited by people with the wrong-coloured skin and/or religion, can be fairly easily traced back to the SWAMP.

One definition of the SWAMP would be the people who own, and dictate policy to, almost every Western government. It's no coincidence, imo, that the number of Western governments which are NOT pro-Israel can be counted on the fingers of one hand. This unsavory factoid, alone, is worthy of detailed scrutiny, a comprehensive explanation, and an overtly humble apology.
The SWAMP also owns and controls the (privatised) Military-Industrial Complex, the (privatised) Banking System, the people in charge of the Security Agencies, the so-called News Media, Spin Tanks masquerading as Think Tanks and, last but not least, the TAX HAVENS which provide a safe haven for such vast sums of looted loot that it could be measured in the unit adopted by Scrooge McDuck - the Cubic Acre, of which Scrooge was the proud owner of three(3).

We've been SWAMPed.
It's reversible, and it won't be pretty. But it will be demo-cratic.

Posted by: Hoarsewhisperer | Aug 12, 2017 8:00:48 PM | 16

Does anyone know what to make of this video I ran across via voltairenet?

fireworks in Yemen


Posted by: roza shanina | Aug 12, 2017 8:03:45 PM | 17

It's off US MSM radar like Libya and now Syria somewhat (with the exception of a few white helmets getting killed recently).

I'm re-reading Ratzenberger's We've Got it Made in America book (which is somewhat pro-GOP but dicusses US mfg) where he goes after the media mentioning McLuhan's quote about media being the message. He pointed out how the media missed out on so many genocides because cameras weren't present like Cambodia, Rwanda, etc. He also wrote that the "media magnifies trivia and trivializes reality."

Don't expect US media to focus on Yemen beyond the PBS segment a week ago on starving children without mention of Saudi/US destruction. I think both factors are at play with US media laziness AND the political aspect of keeping uncomfortable facts from the populace.

Posted by: Curtis | Aug 12, 2017 8:27:45 PM | 18

Nobody will go against Saudi. Nobody will protest about the genocide in Awamiyya either. For the moment. MbS is definitely driving toward a crisis though - he's too young to understand that sometimes you have to take your radical measures more slowly, if you want them to survive. There's quite a bit of talk of rumblings in the Saudi family. It may erupt, though more likely when MbS gets to be king.

Posted by: Laguerre | Aug 13, 2017 5:20:44 AM | 20

Don't forget the geostrategic component. Because the pipeline option through Syria has failed, Yemen and Somalia are extremely important for western oil tankers if the Strait of Hormuz is closed by Iran because of some air-borne "incidents" by the usual suspects.

Posted by: Gesine Hammerling | Aug 13, 2017 5:23:58 AM | 21

Two things I am reminded of is Steppenwolf's tune The Pusher and a verse from the Bible .Because lawlessness will abound the love of many will grow cold . I say God dam the lawyers who make killing legal . Could it be the Legal Cult is who we should attack .Need a sanction , call a lawyer . Need to torture , call a lawyer .

Posted by: terry | Aug 13, 2017 8:36:00 AM | 22

Saudis should go to Burma instead of destroying yemen

Posted by: Soso | Aug 13, 2017 8:36:57 AM | 23

The war on Yemen rages, yet, Yemenis' plight is STILL not receiving the attention it deserves - not from the media, nor from politicians

and just what benefits would accrue with more attention from the media and the political class? i'd wager the situation would be even worse.

...

war is the patron saint of the great american work ethic and, in fact, once upon a time it brought virtually full employment and good wages.

but the blueprint was always unstable, now the landscapes are more scorched and hostile, the pickings slimmer, 'the good old days' relegated to a genocidal overlord's nostalgia.

Posted by: john | Aug 13, 2017 9:00:27 AM | 24

@Curtis 17

If it serves a foreign policy purpose, e.g. construct a new enemy, media attention can increase rather quickly. Actually Cambodia got quite a lot of coverage, unlike the massacres in Indonesia at the same time.
Interesting that Syria seems to disappear from the front pages, eclipsed by N Korea...

@Laguerre 19

Saudi Arabia can become a 'rogue state' to the West just as quickly as Iraq did, and MbS knows this full well. I find it rather surprising how much coverage Awamiya gets, given that it's not really a big deal - forced relocation and redevelopment are common in many countries. Is it a warning?

@Gesine 20

The Syrian strategy games involved gas pipelines, not oil. Having an oil terminal in Yemen would only be useful for exports to Asia - albeit not for very long, since in the event of a serious war, Iran would quickly destroy Saudi oil infrastructure with missiles.

Posted by: smuks | Aug 13, 2017 9:22:45 AM | 25

...
war is the patron saint of the great american work ethic and, in fact, once upon a time it brought virtually full employment and good wages.

but the blueprint was always unstable, now the landscapes are more scorched and hostile, the pickings slimmer, 'the good old days' relegated to a genocidal overlord's nostalgia.

Posted by: john | Aug 13, 2017 9:00:27 AM | 23

I think the first sentence reverses the reality of cause and effect. Imo, it would be more accurate to say that in the immediate post-WWII economic boom, full employment was the patron saint of war, because that's when Overthrow Inc resumed testing its World Domination theories - at Taxpayers expense.

In the 1950s and 1960s, income tax imposed a far greater (and fairer) burden on Rich Folks than on Joe Average, worldwide. There were also Death Duties and higher taxes on unearned income (dividends, interest, rent etc). Over the next 40+ years Rich Folks gradually hijacked governments and arranged tax breaks for themselves and, by declaring war on Unions and other Commies, wage cuts and freezes on Joe Average. They thereby gutted the tax base and thus the ability of governments to cover the "optional" costs of Warmongering from a previously reliable source - leaving a larger and larger hole in the National Budget.

So when the 'blueprint' was written it had the potential to remain stable but was subsequently and deliberately undermined in the decades after 1950 by greedy Rich Folks for whom too much money could never be enough. There was nothing innocent or accidental about the net result on AmeriKKKa's economy. The people who've been calling the shots knew exactly what they were doing and what the result would be.

Posted by: Hoarsewhisperer | Aug 13, 2017 11:17:55 AM | 26

Rich Folks (with their obligatory anti-socialism whining) didn't just shoot themselves in the foot when they insisted that the Government "socialise" their losses by bailing them out after the Sub-prime Scam; they blew the foundations out from under their own Fake ideology.

Posted by: Hoarsewhisperer | Aug 13, 2017 11:48:50 AM | 27

Has Yemen become a spectator sport?

Yes... In a way it reminds me of Rwanda, though the political context was different. The genocide (huge) there was ignored by the W / PTB, for x reasons, in favor of Kagame, now in power btw.

KSA attacks weak neighbour, as it is in dire straits and looking forward to demotion, and it has to emulate the US (attack thru weakness to decimate the weak..) so the US cannot but support...

Posted by: Noirette | Aug 13, 2017 11:51:06 AM | 28

re 24

Pretty well all your reply to me is wrong.

Saudi Arabia can become a 'rogue state' to the West just as quickly as Iraq did, and MbS knows this full well.
No, not at all. Saddam was a superficial ally. Saudi is deep in the US financial system, keeping it stable (or at least it was, but I think still is). If Saudi could have been dumped like Iraq, it already would have been.

I find it rather surprising how much coverage Awamiya gets, given that it's not really a big deal - forced relocation and redevelopment are common in many countries.
You have a light idea of what is happening. Not a big deal!?
Awamiyya has been surrounded be a 4-metre high concrete wall of Israeli style, and nobody can get in or out, and nobody is revealing what goes on inside. You're allowing the lack of knowledge about what goes on inside Saudi to mean all is well and fine. The fact that they're able to conceal internal political problems in Saudi, which are by the way much more extensive than reported.

Posted by: Laguerre | Aug 13, 2017 12:18:32 PM | 29

As SA attacks Yemen, US drones, battleships, US soldiers and proxies has been attacking Somalia (under auspices of GWOT) since 2001. The Gulf of Aden bisects these two countries.


Posted by: fast freddy | Aug 13, 2017 12:19:15 PM | 30

@Laguerre

As you say, 'at least it was' - that ended in 2014 when the oil price dropped. Check the Saudi current account & foreign reserve statistics. KSA 'can' be dropped, if this is deemed an advantage - not saying it 'will' be dropped tomorrow. A constant threat is more effective than the action itself.
(You're right about Saddam btw, but this doesn't invalidate the point I made.)

The reports I read state that Awamiya is being demolished, with residents forcefully evicted, some killed in the process. This is pretty bad, yes - but it is nowhere near a 'genocide'.

Posted by: smuks | Aug 13, 2017 12:48:18 PM | 31

the fact the usa/uk and the west are not aggressively going after saudi arabia to stop this, tells anyone all they need to know..

canada complained a wee bit on how their weapons they sold were being used on the people of saudi arabia, but not a peep on what saudi arabia is doing to yemen...

the west is suffering from what appears like an incurable sickness... - the god of money reigns supreme in the ''''democractic'''' parliaments of the west..

Posted by: james | Aug 13, 2017 12:51:47 PM | 32

@Hoarsewhisperer 26

Well said.
The bail-outs destroyed any belief in the idea of capital owners' risk-taking & responsibility. Such things had happened before, but never on such a comprehensive scale. Plus, it showed everyone that 'money' is actually over-abundant in our system, it can be created by the trillion with a few clicks. Changes of mentality take time, but are extremely powerful processes...

This doesn't bode well for further accumulation/ capital gains. ;-)

Posted by: smuks | Aug 13, 2017 12:58:32 PM | 33

"Pincer Movement" of sorts occurring. Saudi on one flank - Yemen, the US on the other flank - Somalia. Neither atrocity is reported in the MSM. Control (Full Spectrum) of Red Sea and Gulf of Aden appears to be at issue.

Chinese base in Djibouti is a recent development.

Posted by: fast freddy | Aug 13, 2017 1:12:34 PM | 34

US/UK/EU indifference to the plight of the people of Yemen is rank injustice but worse than that screams at us of the true nature of the vile West.

Posted by: AriusArmenian | Aug 13, 2017 1:17:47 PM | 35

While nattering about Overthrow Inc and the early 1950s in #25, the name King Farouk popped into my head for the first time in 60+ years. My only recollection from that time is that he fell from grace because he had a huge collection of dirty pictures which was apparently too self-indulgent in an ugly and perverted way and deemed un-Royal.

What's interesting about King Farouk, to me, is that I've never heard his name mentioned again, by anyone, in any context, and am beginning to wonder why he's been erased from History and whether it's AmeriKKKan History he was erased from?

Posted by: Hoarsewhisperer | Aug 13, 2017 1:47:06 PM | 36

Hoarsewhisperer says:

because that's when Overthrow Inc resumed testing its World Domination theories

yeah, exactly. in the 1940s only war ended the depression and created a full employment economy, which created the great american work ethic. there was lots of patriotism involved.

today we have a trillion dollar (at least) a year defense allocation.

Posted by: john | Aug 13, 2017 1:53:18 PM | 37

@11 I want to echo your well written comments.

Shireen Al-Adeimi
I was living in Lebanon when the the Islamic Courts (forerunner of Al Shabab & celebrated in BBC articles for bringing order and stability to Mogadishu) passed a law banning drugs. I wrote my daughter and told her to watch Somalia - that there would be war there within 6 months. It actually broke out in 3 months in the form of US supported actions from Kenya.

At that time I wrote again and spoke of the tragedy - that the war in somalia would not end because - unlike Lebanon - there wasn't a large enough and active enough expatriate community to raise and keep the issue of that injustice fixed in the public mind. Instead mass media could frame it as ordered/necessary. It was the perfect ill-defined entity that could be used in whatever way those who determine our current narrative want.

The same was true of Syria... obscure, a history of being maligned, no expat community to "correct" the media or give voice on a local level to the truth of the situation - Syria could be used as desired. After 4 years of slaughter and open butchery (during which I tried in vain to get some kind of humanitarian response organized in our local scene) - butchery that involved 100's of innocents at a time, SUDDENLY one picture (the body of a little boy washed up on a beach) became an iconic tidal wave of 'compassion' and 'we must do something'. My phone rang constantly as the same people that were previously IMMUNE to the butchery now wanted to be involved in alleviating the suffering.

It was not like they did not have reason to be involved previously. The butchery in Syria covered the full gamut of religious, political, racial, and gender identity issues. It was easy to point to a half dozen incidents that reflected 'the cause' of that particular person - but still there had been no response. Simply a blank look. Yet within the space of 48 hours they were all clamouring for "a way to help".

It was like someone flipped a switch.

How is it possible that suddenly, with one event, an entire nation clamours for action? I am a student of movements. They do not work this way. They need time. They build on real issues of injustice. They build in momentum. Certain key leaders are vetted, given prominence, approval, and applause for taking the lead with concrete action. All this is a pre-requisite before they burst on the scene.

None of this happened in the Syrian scene. It was purely and completely media. The scale of such manipulation was breath-taking. Within 48 hours a nation could flip from dispassionate, hardened and uncaring to an outcry of compassion. This is the clearest evidence there is that compassion has been weapon-ized.

Which brings me to the suffering in Yemen. It, like Syria for the first 4 years, is in a kind of 'compassion limbo'. Sadly it will remain there until it can be "useful".

Most people have emotional energy for three to four "causes". By keeping such "causes" media-prominent, other things can be done in the shadows. Should one of the shadow operations start coming to light, there are several ways to regain control of the situation. One is knock off those that are shinning the light. A second is to swamp the story with other media-fed "concerns'. Given the 15 second attention span engineered into people by media, the second is a much preferable and more cost effective strategy.

I wish for the sake of the people of Yemen that their suffering is heard and not prolonged. Unfortunately, my head tells me it is more like Somalia than Lebanon.

May you have both strength and courage to continue speaking truth to unresponsive hearts

Les

Posted by: les7 | Aug 13, 2017 2:13:17 PM | 38

Allegedly, 32 year old King Farouk was permitted escape to Capri with his wife, kids and gold bars.

http://www.historytoday.com/richard-cavendish/abdication-king-farouk

Posted by: fast freddy | Aug 13, 2017 2:22:49 PM | 39

The media is intentionally sowing the divisiveness, hatred and dischord. All to hang onto their ill-gotten gains aquired via their globalist puppet masters. More and more people are waking up to this fact. Whether one is left or right or in the center off the aisle, it matters not to the corrupt Deep State controlled mainstream media. All that matters to them is creating the smokescreen of what is really taking place and protecting their cashcow. People of both sides of the political aisle need to resist this divisiveness and come together. More proof that they openly lie to the public is here: #WhitehelmetsEXP Intertwined — The White Helmets and FSA Terrorist Groups — Evidence of Collusion -Part 1 https://clarityofsignal.com/2017/08/13/intertwined-the-white-helmets-and-fsa-terrorist-groups-evidence-of-collusion-part-1/

Posted by: Liam | Aug 13, 2017 3:03:41 PM | 40

Les7 38
Good points. It's the media inspired (coordinated) knee-jerk reaction to get support (for action or complacency while some other actor takes action). Al Awamiya is another matter. I had known of the Saudi crackdowns on protests in Bahrain and the eastern part of SA but I did not know of recent efforts. A real genocide? Maybe not but slow motion destruction of a society like West Bank?

https://www.counterpunch.org/2017/05/23/al-awamiya-city-of-resistance/
(not the best of sources but some info nonetheless)


BTW, I do not recommend Ratzenberger beyond his support for US workers and mfg. His support for Churchill, the war on Iraq, etc tells me he's been a useful idiot for the GOP and warmongering. I did like his comments on what our media has become.

Posted by: Curtis | Aug 13, 2017 4:34:05 PM | 41

liam 40
Sad but true and familiar pix. The pix near the bottom of US presidents getting meddles from the Saudis are priceless in context. I would label them "partners in crime."

Posted by: Curtis | Aug 13, 2017 4:47:15 PM | 42

Hey b..you're full of shit. You know that, right?

This post will last long enough for a few to see. Then it will disappear like the last one.

Hey james, grow a pair.

Posted by: peter | Aug 13, 2017 9:29:19 PM | 43

lol peter... take a trip to yemen for us all and report back..

Posted by: james | Aug 13, 2017 9:42:50 PM | 44

LaGuerre @29

Someone: "Saudi Arabia can become a 'rogue state' to the West just as quickly as Iraq did, and MbS knows this full well."
No, not at all. Saddam was a superficial ally. Saudi is deep in the US financial system, keeping it stable (or at least it was, but I think still is). If Saudi could have been dumped like Iraq, it already would have been.

Effectively, because of their investments, and also their very lucrative orders to the Military-Industrial Complex, Saudis and other Gulfies are very rich Americans (Westerners, if you will). They form a component of the western ruling class.

Posted by: Piotr Berman | Aug 13, 2017 11:40:41 PM | 45

http://www.miamiherald.com/news/business/article167049667.html

Posted by: Mina | Aug 14, 2017 4:51:55 PM | 46

@45 Well said.. sadly.

Posted by: Lozion | Aug 14, 2017 6:27:06 PM | 47

Les musulmans du monde entier devraient faire la grève du pèlerinage aux lieux saints de l'Arabie Saoudite pour faire réfléchir ces derniers usurpateurs et gestionnaires de lieux sacrés qu'ils parjurent puisqu'ils sont tributaires de l'argent qu'ils perçoivent indûment du pèlerinage et du pétrole qu'ils n'ont même pas découvert et dont le baril baisse à vue d'œil ! CQFD SLM

Posted by: BAL | Aug 15, 2017 1:33:28 AM | 48

Entièrement d'accord.

Posted by: Mina | Aug 15, 2017 4:22:09 AM | 49

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