Moon of Alabama Brecht quote
January 15, 2013

Mission Creep At Lightning Speed

France says Mali victory 'will be swift'
France strongly defended its military intervention in northern Mali yesterday, dismissing any suggestion of a long-term commitment comparable to the West's operation in Afghanistan launched in response to the attacks of September 11, 2001.
...
[France's foreign minister, Laurent Fabius,] said French strikes in Mali had succeeded in halting the insurgents' progress towards the south of the country but that the operation was designed to last only for a few weeks. "Later on, we can come as backup but we have no intention of staying forever," he said.
The "few weeks" term was also used by the Malian foreign minister:
The France-led military intervention in Mali to oust Islamist rebels from the west African country may last a few weeks, Malian Foreign Affairs Minister Tieman Hubert Coulibali said on Tuesday.
But now we get a different mission and a very undefined time table from the French president Hollande:
"As soon as there is an African force, in the coming days or weeks, that is backed by the international community and by Europe, France will not have a reason to stay in Mali," he told a news conference during a visit to the United Arab Emirates.

"We have one goal, however. To ensure that when we leave, when we end our intervention, Mali is safe, has legitimate authorities, an electoral process and there are no more terrorists threatening its territory," Hollande said.

Ten years later ...

There is very little chance that Mali, in its current configuration where a restive Tuareg/Berber north has for decades tried to separate from the south, will ever be safe, have legitimate authorities, an electoral process and no "terrorists".

By announcing these new nation building aims and by increasing the troop strength to, for now, 2,500, Hollande in effect announced a never ending occupation. It is highly unlikely that the locals will put up with that.

Posted by b on January 15, 2013 at 12:02 PM | Permalink

Comments

Been following this for a while, watching weapons and insurgents move from Libya. Some recent links I've found helpful:

Mali: France’s Neo-Colonial War for Uranium?

Stefan Simanowitz wrote in 2009: “A key reason that the government in Mali and Niger are not keen to give the Tuareg greater autonomy is that the areas that they inhabit are home to vast natural resources with the world third largest uranium reserves as well as substantial oil reserves.” He pointed out that French mining company Areva, had lost its almost complete exclusive right to Niger’s uranium. This could easily explain why France could not afford to lose Mali as well.

and

Criticisms of the military involvement in Mali are already coming from within France. Former French prime minister Dominique de Villepin said that the military intervention in Mali was “ill thought-out” and compared it to the US “war on terror.” De Villepin compared France’s attempt to stem Islamists in Mali to “a decade of lost wars in Afghanistan, Iraq and Libya”.

“How has the neo-conservative virus been able to infect our outlook? This unanimous enthusiasm for war, the haste with which we are doing it, and the deja-vu of ‘war on terror’ worries me. We will be fighting alone without a reliable Malian partner. With the removal of the Malian president in March, and its prime minister in December, with the collapse of the deeply divided Malian army, and amid the wholesale failure of the Malian state, who can we rely on for backup?” said de Villepin. De Villepin argues that what is needed is a political effort to bring the Tuareg together with the south to negotiate a reasonable solution, while isolating the Islamists. Ever since the start of the Iraq war, De Villepin has not stopped advocating for “political resolutions of crises away from the vicious cycle of armed force.”

Financial Enslavement of West Africans By France

The NYTimes has a former Mali Ambassador (now with the US Defense Dept) cite the usual talking points, not mentioning uranium once, and referring to the Tuareg uprising as beginning in 2011.

Those commenting are not fooled.


Posted by: erichwwk | Jan 15, 2013 4:15:12 PM | 1


b

My comment seems to be gone (do have screen shot claiming it was posted). Glitch on my end or did I state something unacceptable?

Posted by: erichwwk | Jan 15, 2013 4:30:18 PM | 2

erichwwk, it seems to happen when posts are very long. Split it up in two posts and it will pass ...

Posted by: somebody | Jan 15, 2013 4:34:13 PM | 3

Thanks somebody! Will do, and save in source code next time.

Posted by: erichwwk | Jan 15, 2013 4:38:59 PM | 4

Been following this for a while, watching weapons and insurgents move from Libya. Some recent links:

Mali: France’s Neo-Colonial War for Uranium?”

Stefan Simanowitz wrote in 2009: “A key reason that the government in Mali and Niger are not keen to give the Tuareg greater autonomy is that the areas that they inhabit are home to vast natural resources with the world third largest uranium reserves as well as substantial oil reserves.” He pointed out that French mining company Areva, had lost its almost complete exclusive right to Niger’s uranium. This could easily explain why France could not afford to lose Mali as well.

Criticisms of the military involvement in Mali are already coming from within France. Former French prime minister Dominique de Villepin said that the military intervention in Mali was “ill thought-out” and compared it to the US “war on terror.” De Villepin compared France’s attempt to stem Islamists in Mali to “a decade of lost wars in Afghanistan, Iraq and Libya”.
“How has the neo-conservative virus been able to infect our outlook? This unanimous enthusiasm for war, the haste with which we are doing it, and the deja-vu of ‘war on terror’ worries me.

Posted by: erichwwk | Jan 15, 2013 4:53:12 PM | 5

also in above article:

Stefan Simanowitz wrote in 2009: “A key reason that the government in Mali and Niger are not keen to give the Tuareg greater autonomy is that the areas that they inhabit are home to vast natural resources with the world third largest uranium reserves as well as substantial oil reserves.” He pointed out that French mining company Areva, had lost its almost complete exclusive right to Niger’s uranium. This could easily explain why France could not afford to lose Mali as well.

Posted by: erichwwk | Jan 15, 2013 4:56:21 PM | 6

Once your missive is longer than a few paragraphs it's wise to move your text over to a dedicated text editing application and then copy/paste & post it back on the Moon when complete. Your PC/tablet/phone may be rock-solid but web browsers and most public back-end hosts like the kind B uses for the Moon... aren't.

Posted by: Pyrrho | Jan 15, 2013 4:57:23 PM | 7

Financial Enslavement of West Africans By France


The
NYTimes has a former Mali Ambassador (now with the US Defense Dept) cite the usual talking points, not mentioning uranium once, and referring to the Tuareg uprising as beginning in 2011.
Those commenting are not fooled.

Posted by: erichwwk | Jan 15, 2013 5:04:08 PM | 8

Don't forget the critical role of China in Mali

Mali and the other former French colonies which surround it have had extensive dealings with China. The country, one of the poorest in the world, has received substantial Chinese money for development. In 2011 China made good on a package of hundreds of millions, partially as a “gift” to improve the “living standards of Malian people”.

Some argue that China will sit back and let the French do its work for it by handling the crisis and restoring some kind of stability, with China perhaps moving back in later. Contrary to that view, it is worth considering that the intervention may be at least partially informed by a need to counter the Chinese, certainly on the part of the US and also on the part of major European countries.

Posted by: somebody | Jan 15, 2013 5:12:31 PM | 9

oh well, there is Russia, too

UNITED NATIONS, January 15 -- As French bombing of Mali expands, Inner City Press on Tuesday asked the UN if it has any plans to track and report on the killing of civilians, as they do in other conflicts.

Secretary General Ban Ki-moon's spokesman Martin Nesirky said he'll see if any UN "formal mechanism." He would not or could not confirm the figure of 11 civilians killed so far, nor the difficulty in evacuating the injured in Douentza reported by Rosa Crestani of Medecins Sans Frontieres.

Earlier, Inner City Press asked the head of Ban's Department of Political Affairs Jeffrey Feltman about the requirement in Security Council Resolution 2085 that Ban "confirm in advance the Council's satisfaction" with the planned military action.

Feltman said that "satisfaction" would be conveyed in one of the Secretary General's reports, which are public.

But they are public only on a delay. Meanwhile, in terms of satisfaction, Inner City Press was approach Tuesday outside the Security Council by an African diplomat who was critical of a wire service headline that "yesterday the Security Council approved France's bombing."

Inner City Press then asked Russian Permanent Representative Vitaly Churkin if that was an accurate account. No, he said, there was no outcome of the meeting.

What about what French Permanent Representative Gerard Araud said at the stakeout, that all members of the Security Council supported France's action?

"He went too far," Churkin said of Araud.

Posted by: somebody | Jan 15, 2013 5:32:06 PM | 10

Q: ...that is backed by the international community...

R: 1 Q - who the fuck is the 'international community' and who has the audacity to pretend to represent it? Time for Beijing to start bombing LA suburbs in order to protect Chinatown and its residents or Japan to hunt down Crips & Bloods rebels to ensure their nationals' safety in 'Little Tokyo.'

Posted by: Daniel Rich | Jan 15, 2013 6:44:52 PM | 11

white house turning on Morsi?

http://news.yahoo.com/us-condemns-comments-egypts-morsi-203100507--politics.html

Posted by: nikon | Jan 15, 2013 6:56:17 PM | 12

Mmmmm The "War on Terror" is everyone's excuse now days for intervention and resource hegemony. Lovely!

Posted by: ben | Jan 15, 2013 7:28:57 PM | 13

I tend to think Mali is a trap.

Mali is a large country, roughly double the size of Afghanistan with roughly 2/3 occupied by non-governmental entities.

Mali is far, far away from other "islamist troublemaker" countries. And that seems to be the point.
Furthermore, there is nothing interesting for Europe there that can (and is) not be had for relatively small money. Sure enough the people there or democracy is not a reason nato powers would care about.

While the us is occupied to somehow get out of the middle east without losing its face even more and playing their pivot game towards SE Asia, the european part of nato is coming to be in charge of the middle east.

The usa is basically broken. It's merely a question of time how long they will manage to keep their empty-hands poker games rolling. A war with Russia would be both suicidal and unnecessary as the Russian bear is not agressive when left alone.
So it's China where the usa put their hope. Still a little behind Russia in military technology and inmidst a process to become less dependent on exports as well as becoming the next number 1 power the americans try to cut as big a peace they can get.

That also means that whoever wants to finally break nato has to break Europe. What better way than to draw it into a long and bloody and fruitless war?

That's in short overview what I think Mali is all about.

Posted by: Mr. Pragma | Jan 15, 2013 10:38:54 PM | 14

The following article has a pretty good itemization of Mali's known mineral resources.

The War on Mali. What you Should Know: An Eldorado of Uranium, Gold, Petroleum, Strategic Minerals …

http://www.globalresearch.ca/the-war-on-mali-what-you-should-know/5319093

"So here we have it

Whatever is reported by the mainstream media, the goal of this new war is no other than stripping yet another country of its natural resources by securing the access of international corporations to do it. What is being done now in Mali through bombs and bullets is being done to Ireland, Greece, Portugal and Spain by means of debt enslavement."

Posted by: вот так | Jan 16, 2013 4:04:24 AM | 15

Another aspect of the invasion of Mali being ignored by the zionist media - booting Chinese interests. That was one of the reasons Israel-America trashed Libya.

Mali and the Geo-Politics of Africa

http://antiwar.com/blog/2013/01/15/mali-and-the-geo-politics-of-africa/

"The Obama administration has waged several military interventions in Africa – from regime change in Libya, to a drone/proxy war in Somalia, boots on the ground in and around Uganda, covert special operations in Nigeria, and now Mali.

Through the Pentagon’s Africa Command, the US is now training and equipping militaries in countries including Algeria, Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone and Tunisia in the name of preventing “terrorists from establishing sanctuaries.” The strategy appears irreconcilable with recent history, however, given how the US-sponsored invasion of Somalia by Ethiopia in 2006 gave rise to the militant group al-Shabaab – now ironically justifying current interventions; and the action in Libya, the consequences of which led to this latest intervention in Mali.

“China-Africa trade grew 1000% from $10 billion in 2000 to $107 billion in 2008,” a trend Washington apparently intends to counter with persistent efforts to produce client military states throughout Africa and extend economic influence over the continent. In the context of Obama’s Asia-Pivot – which amounts to a desperate economic and military offensive aimed at containing China’s rise – this shift in focus to Africa makes a lot more sense."

Posted by: вот так | Jan 16, 2013 4:09:20 AM | 16

The fascist feeding trough is drooling:

Key House Republicans Push for Bigger US Role in Mali War

http://news.antiwar.com/2013/01/15/key-house-republicans-push-for-bigger-us-role-in-mali-war/

Posted by: вот так | Jan 16, 2013 4:14:29 AM | 17

14, basically it is another colonialist crime in the 19th century pattern.

France has been trying to play off all local sides to keep influence with a blind hatred by Sarkozy for one side and now this side has collapsed and the other two sides have come to an agreement.

Nobody in the area or the world wants the independence of Azawad. That is all that is to it.

The bombing will get criminal and ugly.

Posted by: somebody | Jan 16, 2013 4:17:21 AM | 18

Now that they've sent ground troops, will they be sent to the uranium mines right away?

Posted by: peter radiator | Jan 16, 2013 4:20:58 AM | 19

Mali: the west's addiction to war is spreading terrorism, not reducing it

http://www.stopwar.org.uk/index.php/middle-east-and-north-africa/2180-mali-the-wests-addiction-to-war-is-spreading-terrorism-not-reducing-it

"RT: Should France just sit back and let terrorism and extremism reign over Mali where it could perhaps become a haven for extremism and terrorism and just threaten regional stability but become a base for terrorist operation worldwide…

JR: If the French want to do something about reducing the antagonism between their state and the Muslim people both in France and abroad, they should start at home. They should start withdrawing the laws which make it illegal for women to wear Islamic hair dresses in France. They should withdraw the law that now makes it illegal for Muslims to pray in the streets in France. Perhaps if they want better relations with the Muslim world, they could start by bettering the relations with the Muslim community in France itself. That would be a far more significant step forward than bombing yet another Muslim country."

Nice response.

Posted by: вот так | Jan 16, 2013 4:25:06 AM | 20

yep. the misinformation war making Touareg independent fighters Islamist Jihadis continues - picturing veiled men as terrorist - hell, their women do not veil!

All this misinformation propaganda will make it even more difficult for Muslims to live in Western countries, they are labeled the enemy again.

I guess the Muslim Brotherhood strategy is dead for now.

Posted by: somebody | Jan 16, 2013 4:35:28 AM | 21

"All this misinformation propaganda will make it even more difficult for Muslims to live in Western countries, they are labeled the enemy again."

The engineered "clash of civilizations" and the bulk of the anti-Muslim bigotry is the dedicated work of the zionist portion of the fascist western ruling establishment.

Posted by: вот так | Jan 16, 2013 4:46:47 AM | 22

Don't worry folks. Hollande says his Mali campaign to bring western civilization to them ungrateful and barbaric Tuareg heathens, will only last a "few weeks".

Jeees..now where did I hear this before??? Again, like other French follies, such as the one in Vietnam, the US will have to come in and bail them out and take the body bags that come with it.

I wonder the kind of history they teach French kids in school these days..?

Posted by: Zico | Jan 16, 2013 6:22:03 AM | 23

How to report that France is loosing ground while writing it's moving forward :

Le Monde :
- three days ago : Konna is now free of any "terrorist" and the Mopti-Konna area is secured. About the loss of an helicopter, Le Drian says "we're surprised"

- two days ago : "terrorists" move through Mauretania from NW towards Bamako, and reached Diabali. Le Drians says "yeah, it was planned, we knew it". Near Konna, we have reports that "terrorists flee without fighting and leave their weapons behind"

- yesterday : ah, well, in fact Konna is not free, there are still pockets.

- today : In the West, French ground troops move towards Diabali, while "terrorists" are reported 80km north of Markala. At the same time, French troops secure a vital bridge on Niger river at Marakala to "lock the only way between north Mali and Bamako".

Problems are : Marakala is way closer to Bamako than Diabali and even worse, if French troops want to defend themselves behind the left bank of Niger river, they'll have some problem because most Bamako is built on the right bank.
But what is the overall mood in French MSM ? "Everything is fine, this intervention is legal and everyone is behind us".

Posted by: Rhysa | Jan 16, 2013 7:02:54 AM | 24

comprehensive description of what is going on by medico - in German -
no it is not about Islam

Posted by: somebody | Jan 16, 2013 7:13:35 AM | 25

well, getting rid of Gaddafi must have been the most stupid idea declining empires had designed ever ...
30 terrorists occupy important BP oil base on the Algerian/Libyan border
Now what - occupy the Sahel?

Posted by: somebody | Jan 16, 2013 7:46:08 AM | 26

via Zero Anthropology a link to this article How Washington helped foster the Islamist uprising in Mali

Jeremy Keenan's Book at amazon The Dark Sahara: America's War on Terror in Africa

Posted by: erichwwk | Jan 16, 2013 8:38:59 AM | 27

"well, getting rid of Gaddafi must have been the most stupid idea declining empires had designed ever"

No one heard a word of complaint out of you though, at the time . . . .

Posted by: yeah, but . . . | Jan 16, 2013 8:58:53 AM | 28

erichwwk, 28, thanks for the article, that explains it well.

Posted by: somebody | Jan 16, 2013 9:52:12 AM | 29

This is GOOD NEWS! Clearly this means the French economy has turned the corner and they have excess revenue. France would never waste it's precious resources on far flung adventures for light and transient causes. Vive la France, Vive prosperitie, Vive Egalite!

Posted by: scottindallas | Jan 16, 2013 10:52:40 AM | 30

@30 Vive Dassault Aviation.

Posted by: dh | Jan 16, 2013 11:25:24 AM | 31

Perhaps you all know it, but it hasn't been stated. The US/NATO/Africom operate a major base at Tamrassett. That isn't far from Mali. It's closer to Mali than to Algerians 90% of which live within 30mi of the Med. Tamrassett and Northern Mali are the Western leg of the venerable trans-Saharan trade route. In a way, there's nothing at all remote about Mali, except to ignorant Westerners.

Posted by: scottindallas | Jan 16, 2013 11:39:04 AM | 32

French press (Le Monde) is beginning to wake up

Translation: Fighters have joined for financial reasons, AQMI has money from ransom payments, Ansar Eddine is partly funded by Algier and Mujao is proven to be funded by the Qatari Red Crescent intermediary and by Saudi funds.

Par ailleurs, beaucoup de combattants ont rejoint ces rangs pour des raisons financières. AQMI a de l'argent grâce aux otages, les caisses d'Ansar Eddine sont en partie remplies par Alger et le Mujao reçoit des fonds manifestement par l'intermédiaire du Croissant-Rouge qatari et des réseaux saoudiens. La fidélité des soldats islamistes n'est pas que religieuse et peut donc vite s'évanouir.

So whose allies are Saudi Arabia, Quatar and Algier and who is fighting?

Posted by: somebody | Jan 16, 2013 11:43:50 AM | 33

Mali - its complex, Heinrich Böll Foundation, think tank of the German Green Party

Translation:
The educated, French speaking minority is split on the military solution:
The old political class surrounding the interim president Dioncounda Traoré uses the Western label of "War against Terrorism" i.e. Islamists who cut off limbs.
Pro putsch forces argue in a diametrically different way. No foreign forces should enter Mali, Islamic terroris are a pretext of the West to remain in the Sahara militarily and control the suspected resources of North Mali (uranium, oil, rare earth, subterranean water).
The older generation thinks France backs the MNLA: They remember that France in 1957 planned for an independent Sahara state, thereby securing its interes in this strategic zone, Tuareg rebels are seen as helpers of French interest and defined as the main ennemy. As it is only them, not the Islamists who threaten the integrity of the country.
Many Camara, an anthropologist, who is an activist against the planned uranium mining in South West Mali: „France has an interest in destabilizing the Sahel zone for its own interest. Tuaregs are being instrumentalized for this aim“
...
Safiatou Diarra, a women's mouvement veteran and one of the first college teachers in independent Mali remembers, that Modibo Keita, Mali's first president, talked about the attempt of a „Balkanization of Africa“. „The French told us that Kidal (a Nothern Town) was not part of Mali. That is why Kidal ist the symbol for our nation"

Posted by: somebody | Jan 16, 2013 2:28:39 PM | 34

Folks should know. I posted this elsewhereKeenan has long argued that Islamist terror groups in North Africa are masterminded by Algeria, with the knowledge of the CIA and other intelligence services, which stage "false flag" attacks to expand Algerian political influence over the region and its economic resources[3]. In his book "The Dark Sahara", Keenan accuses the United States and Algeria of having conspired to fabricate evidence and exaggerate the threat of al-Qaeda terrorism in Northern Africa. He calls the "global war on terror" a deception and claims that it is causing immense damage to the peoples of the Sahara, namely the Tuareg.

A friend, married to an Algerian and who has lived there, was/is? on a Phd program in PS at UC Berkeley wrote:

Keenan is not taken at all seriously by scholars though he gets himself a lot of media time. For much, much better Algerian (and Sahara/Sahel) analysis start with The Moor Next Door, for example.

Posted by: erichwwk | Jan 16, 2013 3:19:40 PM | 35

Same person

The Arabist is good as well.

In inquiring as to specifics of Keenan criticism received this:

Following The Moor Next Door links will get you to all of this eventually, but here he is in some depth with a diplomatic but critique of Keenan tucked in.

Posted by: erichwwk | Jan 16, 2013 3:25:10 PM | 36

N. Africa not my main focus. perhaps someone else has the time?

You really should get on twitter as all of these guys and more are on with real time analysis as well as back and forth. Also some people on the ground in Mali. But, for now, one more good source: http://thewasat.wordpress.com/


al-Wasat - الوسط

Posted by: erichwwk | Jan 16, 2013 3:39:42 PM | 37

37)From the Jadalliya link

(It should be noted there were many scholars who took similar views to Keenan but whose writing was more sophisticated and rigorous in its scholarship, but Keenan’s narrative has become exceptionally prominent in the popular geopolitics of the Maghreb-Sahel; this is deeply unfortunate).
So 'serious' academics are saying that Keenan's views are broadly supported, however he is a successful popularizer whose descriptions are non-academic and too broad brush.

Posted by: somebody | Jan 17, 2013 2:37:51 AM | 38

36) From the "Moor Next Door"

Until 2012, AQIM in the Sahara had been a relatively successful criminal organization – kidnap for ransom, smuggling, narco-trafficking, etc – but it was not a very good or very committed salafi jihadi terrorist organization. From 2008 until 2012 it prioritized making money over ideology. It was intertwined with local populations to the extent that they provided cover and support for illicit activities, but it did not try to impose its salafi jihadi ideology on the population with which it interacted. In general, its roughly 500 fighters existed on the margins of an already marginal region. It was troublesome, but it did not pose a strategic threat to local governments or Europe or the US. That obviously changed in 2012 with the influx of Libyan weapons, the Tuareg rebellion, the collapse of the government in Bamako and its control of the northern half of Mali. AQIM went from a criminally inclined, underperforming Al Qaeda affiliate with dubious loyalty to controlling a large territory and running a “terrorist safe haven” in a country that was an ally to both France and the US. And it placed AQIM and the other Islamist organizations with which it has tensely shared power – Movement for Oneness and Jihad in West Africa (MUJAO) and Ansar al-Din – squarely in France’s sights.

LOL

Posted by: somebody | Jan 17, 2013 2:52:16 AM | 39

I'm going to enjoy waiting for USUK & France's right-wing cranks to decide who to blame for their 40-hostage SNAFU in Mali.
Is Mali going to be yet another of those not-quite-soft-enough-for-NATO, undefended targets?

Posted by: Hoarsewhisperer | Jan 17, 2013 6:11:34 AM | 40

It's 40 in Southern Algeria. The Magreb is not a Salafist hotbed. There are many cultural traditions (music most notably) where this is an ill fit. That said, Algerians were once proud to follow the fashions of Europe, where today, more and more women are choosing to cover. We (the West) are literally driving the people to become more hardline Islamist. That said, Southern Algeria is a wasteland. One cannot make too many assumptions as to what's going on there. Berber/Toureg villages could do anything down there, and it would be hard to monitor, so long as it's not conspicuous from the air.

Posted by: scottindallas | Jan 17, 2013 6:46:23 AM | 41

40/41) according to German news Algeria is trying to blame the Touareg as "having connections" though Ansar Edinne distanced itself from the act.

I think it is 150 Algerian workers, the 40 are "Western"

Algerian/Malian/Niger/Mauritanian Sahare is not wasteland. It is beautiful and obviously full of potential resources.

Posted by: somebody | Jan 17, 2013 7:45:16 AM | 42

from Ap

Another Algerian official, also not authorized to speak publicly about the attack, said authorities are in contact with tribal elders among Algerian Tuaregs, who are ethnically related to the rebels fighting the Mali government, some of whom have close al-Qaida links.

clear?

Posted by: somebody | Jan 17, 2013 7:51:08 AM | 43

Clusterfuck.

And docens of dead in the massacre/rescue operation already.

It won't become less bloody.

Posted by: ThePaper | Jan 17, 2013 8:40:05 AM | 44

Yep. France is beginning to get it.

Malian desert larger than France

Posted by: somebody | Jan 17, 2013 9:20:37 AM | 45

Nearly 50 hostages, kidnappers killed in Algeria strikes

http://www.presstv.ir/detail/2013/01/17/284082/nearly-50-people-killed-in-algeria-strikes/

"Some 34 hostages and 15 kidnappers have been killed in airstrikes on a gas facility in Algeria, ANI news agency says."

Posted by: вот так | Jan 17, 2013 10:34:29 AM | 46

EU agrees to launch military mission to train Malian Army

http://www.presstv.ir/detail/2013/01/17/284079/eu-to-launch-mali-military-mission/

"The European Union foreign ministers have agreed to back up France in its Mali operations by launching a military mission to train and restructure the West African country's embattled army.

Foreign ministers of the 27-nation bloc appointed French Brigadier General Francois Lecointre as commander of the mission, which is slated to last for 15 months.

The USD 16.33-million operation will reportedly not have a combat role and has only been launched to train Malian forces for fighting against the rebels controlling the northern parts of the African country.

The operation headquarters will be in the capital city of Bamako and training sessions will be held northeast of the city.

The mission will reportedly consist of almost two hundred trainers as well as an unknown number of security forces.
On January 11, France intervened in Mali by launching an air offensive under the pretext of halting the advance of the militants.

Four days later, France announced that it would more than triple the number of its soldiers in Mali from 800 to 2,500. French troops launched their first ground attack against rebel forces on January 16.

EU members are also set to hold an emergency meeting over the crisis in Mali.

Chaos broke out in the African country after Malian President Amadou Toumani Toure was toppled in a military coup on March 22, 2012. The coup leaders said they had mounted the coup in response to the government’s inability to contain the Tuareg rebellion in the north of the country."

Posted by: вот так | Jan 17, 2013 10:37:07 AM | 47

Meanwhile, anti-French sentiment is rising due to their aggression in Mali:

French Embassy cordoned off in Tunisian capital

http://www.presstv.ir/detail/2013/01/17/284083/tunisia-cordons-off-french-embassy/

"French Embassy in Tunisian capital, Tunis, has been reportedly cordoned off amid escalating anger over the European country’s attacks on Mali."

Posted by: вот так | Jan 17, 2013 10:39:15 AM | 48

Additional info on the Algerian hostage strike:

Algerian hostage crisis: Dozens killed, 180 escape

http://english.ruvr.ru/2013_01_17/Algerian-hostage-crisis-Dozens-killed-180-escape/

"Algerian helicopters have attacked a group of Mali Islamists militants held up in a Saharan gas facility, reportedly killing 34 hostages and 15 of their captors. Six foreign hostages and eight of their captors were killed by an Algerian military strike on a vehicle being used by the kidnappers at a remote gas plant, a source in the town where the incident was unfolding said. Some hostages were still being held, and 180 Algerian citizens had escaped..."

Posted by: вот так | Jan 17, 2013 10:51:27 AM | 49

now the Algerian army is not able to take over an oil station - Le Monde

some people seem to know what they are doing.

Posted by: somebody | Jan 17, 2013 5:32:03 PM | 50

By Design: French Mali Invasion Spills into Algeria

http://www.globalresearch.ca/by-design-french-mali-invasion-spills-into-algeria/5319313

Exactly as predicted, the ongoing French “intervention” in the North African nation of Mali has spilled into Algeria – the next most likely objective of Western geopolitical interests in the region since the successful destabilization of Libya in 2011.

In last week’s “France Displays Unhinged Hypocrisy as Bombs Fall on Mali” report, it was stated specifically that:

“As far back as August of 2011, Bruce Riedel out of the corporate-financier funded think-tank, the Brookings Institution, wrote “Algeria will be next to fall,” where he gleefully predicted success in Libya would embolden radical elements in Algeria, in particular AQIM. Between extremist violence and the prospect of French airstrikes, Riedel hoped to see the fall of the Algerian government. Ironically Riedel noted:

Algeria has expressed particular concern that the unrest in Libya could lead to the development of a major safe haven and sanctuary for al-Qaeda and other extremist jihadis.

And thanks to NATO, that is exactly what Libya has become – a Western sponsored sanctuary for Al-Qaeda."

Posted by: вот так | Jan 17, 2013 10:39:35 PM | 51

I think it is very likely the French will back Algeria.

Posted by: somebody | Jan 18, 2013 3:00:24 AM | 52

Mali Islamists tougher than France anticipated: envoys

The surprises about the Mali conflict have not been limited to the militants' behavior on the battlefield, diplomats say.

Before the Islamists launched their offensive earlier this month and threatened to take Bamako, Algerian intelligence had concluded that elements of Ansar Dine would be open to negotiations and would not fight alongside AQIM and others.

That assessment proved incorrect.

"It was believed that there were links between Ansar Dine elements and elements of Algerian intelligence," a diplomat told Reuters. "But those links appear to have vanished."

Algeria's U.N. mission did not respond to a request for comment.

Posted by: somebody | Jan 18, 2013 2:23:03 PM | 53

The comments to this entry are closed.

 

Site Meter